Industrial Water Resource Management

Challenges and Opportunities for Corporate Water Stewardship
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 6. September 2017
  • |
  • 488 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-27246-5 (ISBN)
 
Provides the tools that allow companies to understand the fundamental concepts of water resource management and to take proper action towards sustainable development
Businesses, communities, and ecosystems everywhere depend on clean freshwater to survive and prosper. When the same source of water is shared for economic, social, and environmental causes it becomes the responsibility of every sector to develop a sustainable water strategy beneficial for all. This book offers a water resource management plan for industries that is directly implementable and consistent with the Water Framework Directives of different countries with a special emphasis on developing countries--a plan that is economically efficient, socially equitable, and environmentally sustainable.
Industrial Water Resource Management, Challenges and Opportunities for Efficient Water Stewardship offers explicit technical and investment solutions, socioeconomic and legal instruments, and recommendations for institutional restructuring. Written by a leading world expert in the field, it covers a wide range of topics including:
* Source water assessment and protection
* Water audit, industrial water footprint assessment--an evaluation of tools and methodologies
* Corporate water disclosure methods and tools
* Water stewardship by the industries
* Stakeholder collaboration and engagement
* New technologies enabling companies to better manage water resources
Given the well-known challenge of managing natural resources in a way that maximizes and sustains social welfare, this book provides an invaluable point of reference for applied researchers and policy makers working in water resources management.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons
  • 29,31 MB
978-1-119-27246-5 (9781119272465)
1119272467 (1119272467)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Pradip K. Sengupta, Hydrologist, works at the Jadavpur Centre for Study of Earth Science, India.
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Series Editor Foreword - Challenges in Water Management
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 The context
  • 1.1.1 The story of Coca-Cola in India
  • 1.2 Water goals in the 21st Century
  • 1.3 Water ethics
  • 1.4 Value of water
  • 1.4.1 Water valuation
  • 1.4.2 Application of water valuation
  • 1.5 Water and energy nexus
  • 1.5.1 Impact of energy production on water resources
  • 1.6 Global water stress
  • 1.7 Industrial impact on water resource
  • 1.7.1 Impact on the quantity of the source water
  • 1.7.2 Hydro-morphological impact
  • 1.7.3 Quality impact
  • 1.7.4 Impact on the access to water by the stakeholders
  • 1.7.5 Affordability of water
  • 1.8 Water sustainability
  • 1.9 Impact of climate change
  • 1.10 Dimensions in industrial water management
  • 1.10.1 Global perspective
  • 1.10.2 Water accounting
  • 1.10.3 Water stewardship
  • 1.10.4 Adaptive management
  • 1.11 Green growth and green business
  • 1.11.1 The challenges of green growth
  • 1.11.2 Natural capital concept
  • 1.11.3 Green growth policy fundamentals
  • 1.11.4 Indicators of green growth
  • 1.12 Conclusion
  • Note
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 2 Water Scenarios and Business Models of The Twenty-first Century
  • 2.1 Water scenario
  • 2.1.1 Countrywise water scenario
  • 2.2 Water indicators
  • 2.2.1 Baseline water stress
  • 2.2.2 Inter-annual variability
  • 2.2.3 Water conflict
  • 2.2.4 River basins and aquifers under threat and conflict
  • 2.2.5 Physical water risk in business
  • 2.2.6 Disruption in the supply chain
  • 2.2.7 Failure to meet basic water needs
  • 2.3 Global water trends
  • 2.4 Business models
  • 2.4.1 Business as usual model
  • 2.4.2 Alternative model
  • 2.5 Integrated water resource management
  • 2.5.1 History of IWRM
  • 2.5.2 Principles of IWRM
  • 2.6 Sustainable development goal for business sector
  • 2.7 Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 3 Understanding Water
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Hydrological cycle
  • 3.2.1 Water cycle and ecosystems
  • 3.3 Water on land
  • 3.3.1 Soil water
  • 3.4 Stores of water
  • 3.5 Surface runoff
  • 3.5.1 Meteorological factors affecting runoff
  • 3.5.2 Physical factors affecting runoff
  • 3.5.3 Human activities can affect runoff
  • 3.6 River and river basin
  • 3.6.1 Stream order
  • 3.6.2 Drainage basin, catchment and watershed boundaries
  • 3.6.3 Classification of river basin and hydrological unit
  • 3.7 Industrial impact on river flow
  • 3.7.1 Temporal and spatial control over river flow
  • 3.7.2 Water direct withdrawal
  • 3.7.3 Physical disturbance of riverbeds
  • 3.7.4 Pollution
  • 3.7.5 Water clogging
  • 3.8 Surface water management
  • 3.8.1 Key component of a SWMP
  • 3.9 Groundwater
  • 3.9.1 Groundwater hydrology (hydrogeology)
  • 3.9.2 Fundamentals concepts
  • 3.9.3 Aquifer and confining beds
  • 3.9.4 Groundwater system
  • 3.9.5 Essential studies in groundwater
  • 3.9.6 Relation between groundwater withdrawal and stream flow
  • 3.9.7 Groundwater withdrawal in the recharging zone
  • 3.9.8 Hydrogeological investigation
  • 3.9.5 Groundwater management
  • 3.10 Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 4 Corporate Water Stewardship
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Why water stewardship?
  • 4.2.1 Partnership development
  • 4.2.2 Improve efficiency
  • 4.2.3 Public acceptance
  • 4.2.4 Incentives
  • 4.2.5 Balancing risk and economic performance
  • 4.2.6 Reinforces communication
  • 4.3 Aspects of water stewardship
  • 4.3.1 Legal aspect
  • 4.3.2 Environmental aspect
  • 4.3.3 Social aspect
  • 4.3.4 Technological aspect
  • 4.3.5 Economic aspect
  • 4.4 Challenges in water stewardship
  • 4.4.1 Legal challenges
  • 4.4.2 Challenges in the value chain
  • 4.4.3 Watershed Challenges
  • 4.4.4 Social challenges
  • 4.4.5 Market challenges
  • 4.5 Developing a corporate strategy in water stewardship
  • 4.5.1 Understand and recognise sustainability
  • 4.5.2 Develop an engagement framework
  • 4.5.3 Identification of stakeholders
  • 4.5.4 Engagement risks
  • 4.5.5 Collective action framework
  • 4.6 Goals and commitments
  • 4.7 Establish systems and processes
  • 4.8 Opportunities in water stewardship
  • 4.8.1 Management improvement
  • 4.8.2 Knowledge asset development
  • 4.8.3 Investment
  • 4.8.4 Developing information and database
  • 4.8.5 Human resource development
  • 4.9 Water literacy
  • 4.9.1 Definition and concept
  • 4.9.2 Water literacy framework
  • 4.10 Action programmes under WSI
  • 4.10.1 Conduct a water resource assessment
  • 4.10.2 Conduct a water footprint analysis
  • 4.10.3 Conduct a sustainability analysis
  • 4.10.4 Water accounting and disclosure
  • 4.10.5 Implement mitigation measures
  • 4.11 Outcome of water stewardship initiatives (WSI)
  • 4.12 Water stewardship standards
  • 4.13 Global organisations for facilitating water stewardship
  • 4.14 Water stewardship tools
  • 4.15 Case studies
  • 4.15.1 Unilever
  • 4.15.2 BASF
  • 4.15.3 TOM's of Maine
  • 4.15.4 Mars Inc.
  • 4.15.5 Nestlé
  • 4.15.6 Coca-Cola
  • 4.16 Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 5 Water Governance Framework and Water Acts
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 What is water governance?
  • 5.3 Water laws
  • 5.4 Tasks of water governance
  • 5.5 Challenges in water governance
  • 5.6 Legal framework
  • 5.7 Institutional framework
  • 5.7.1 Ministries
  • 5.7.2 Government Departments
  • 5.7.3 Authorities
  • 5.7.4 Institutions
  • 5.8 Principles of water governance
  • 5.9 Spatial scale of water governance
  • 5.10 Hierarchical governance
  • 5.11 Cross-cutting authority of governance
  • 5.12 Stakeholders engagement in water governance
  • 5.13 Functions and functionaries of the water governance
  • 5.14 Role of civil society organisations (CSO)
  • 5.15 Water governance framework of different countries (case studies)
  • 5.15.1 European union water framework directives
  • 5.15.2 Water governance in Australia
  • 5.15.3 Water governance in Brazil
  • 5.15.4 Water governance in Canada
  • 5.15.5 Water governance in China
  • 5.15.6 Water governance in India
  • 5.15.7 Water governance in Indonesia
  • 5.15.8 Water governance in Namibia
  • 5.15.9 Water governance in South Africa
  • 5.16 Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 6 Water Quality Standards and Water Pollution
  • 6.1 Water quality-standards
  • 6.1.1 Introduction
  • 6.1.2 Quality parameters for drinking water
  • 6.1.3 Microbiological contaminants
  • 6.1.4 Physical parameters
  • 6.1.5 Organic chemical pollutants
  • 6.1.6 Parameters indicative of environmental pollution
  • 6.1.7 Guidelines for standard quality parameters
  • 6.1.8 Water quality requirements of industries
  • 6.1.9 Water quality of effluent
  • 6.2 Industrial water pollution
  • 6.2.1 Definition
  • 6.2.2 Direct reasons of water pollution
  • 6.2.3 Indirect reasons of pollution
  • 6.2.4 Indicators of industrial water pollution
  • 6.2.5 Socio economic indicator of water pollution
  • 6.2.6 Biological indicators of water pollution
  • 6.2.7 Industrial sources of pollution
  • 6.2.8 Water pollution from industrial emission
  • 6.2.9 Water pollution from industrial effluent
  • 6.2.10 Water pollution from solid-waste disposal
  • 6.2.11 Impacts of mining on water quality
  • 6.2.12 Water pollution potentiality in petrochemical and power industry
  • 6.2.13 Groundwater pollution from industrial effluents and leachates
  • 6.2.14 Water pollution identifiers
  • 6.2.15 Management and control of water pollution
  • 6.2.16 Wastewater management
  • 6.2.17 Disposal of wastewater
  • 6.2.18 Effluent treatment
  • 6.2.19 Treatment methods
  • 6.2.20 Solid-waste management
  • 6.2.21 Management of leachate
  • 6.3 Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 7 Water Abstraction, Purification and Distribution
  • 7.1 Overview
  • 7.2 Water sourcing by industries
  • 7.3 Surface water abstraction
  • 7.3.1 Reservoir intake
  • 7.3.2 River and lake intakes
  • 7.3.3 Impacts of surface water abstraction
  • 7.4 Methods of groundwater abstraction
  • 7.4.1 Abstraction of baseflow
  • 7.4.2 Abstraction of groundwater from aquifer
  • 7.4.3 Construction of a tube well
  • 7.4.4 Impacts of groundwater abstraction
  • 7.5 Water abstraction from the sea
  • 7.5.1 Environmental impact of seawater withdrawal
  • 7.6 Conveyance system
  • 7.6.1 Conveying water from the source to the treatment plant
  • 7.7 Water purification
  • 7.7.1 Primary screening
  • 7.7.2 Clarification
  • 7.7.3 Disinfection
  • 7.7.4 Desalination
  • 7.7.5 Membrane technologies
  • 7.8 Water supply and distribution
  • 7.8.1 Pipes
  • 7.8.2 Storage system
  • 7.9 Water delivery and distribution software
  • 7.9.1 Overview
  • 7.9.2 Capabilities
  • 7.9.3 Applications
  • 7.10 Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 8 Water Resource Assessment
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Water resource assessment tools
  • 8.3 General scenario
  • 8.4 WRA basics
  • 8.4.1 Conceptual and policy framework
  • 8.4.2 Defining a research agenda
  • 8.4.3 Defining the physical boundary
  • 8.5 WRA data generation
  • 8.5.1 Secondary data collection
  • 8.5.2 Primary data generation
  • 8.5.3 Biophysical data
  • 8.5.4 Hydrometeorological data
  • 8.5.5 Data table
  • 8.5.6 Hydrogeological data
  • 8.5.7 Socioeconomic data
  • 8.5.8 Water use and discharge
  • 8.6 Water balance
  • 8.7 Estimation of surface runoff
  • 8.7.1 Khosla's Formula
  • 8.7.2 Estimation of rainfall runoff by SCS curve number (CN) method
  • 8.7.3 Runoff calculation
  • 8.8 Estimation of stream discharge
  • 8.8.1 Volumetric gauging
  • 8.8.2 Float gauging
  • 8.8.3 Current metering
  • 8.9 Estimation of renewable groundwater resource
  • 8.9.1 Water level fluctuation method
  • 8.9.2 Rainfall infiltration method
  • 8.9.3 Soil water balance method
  • 8.10 Estimation of pond/reservoir storage volume
  • 8.10.1 Area calculation irregularly shaped ponds
  • 8.10.2 Pond depth and volume estimation
  • 8.11 Estimation of source-water quality
  • 8.11.1 Water sampling
  • 8.11.2 Water analysis
  • 8.12 Aquifer test
  • 8.12.1 Field procedures
  • 8.12.2 Test procedures
  • 8.12.3 Pumping test data reduction and presentation
  • 8.12.4 Analysis of test results
  • 8.12.5 Calculations and aquifer test results
  • 8.13 Build understanding of key catchment processes and interaction
  • 8.14 Long-term simulation of catchment behaviour
  • 8.15 Assessment of sustainable and exploitable water over assessment period
  • 8.16 Presentation of water resource assessment
  • 8.17 Conclusion
  • Note
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 9 Corporate Water Accounting and Disclosure
  • 9.1 The context
  • 9.1.1 Water Risk
  • 9.1.2 Water stress
  • 9.1.3 Water intensity
  • 9.2 Methods of assessing water risk
  • 9.2.1 Water risk assessment tools
  • 9.2.2 Data generation and internal assessment
  • 9.3 Water profiling
  • 9.3.1 Water profile of the basin
  • 9.3.2 Benefit of a watershed profile
  • 9.3.3 Water profile of a company
  • 9.3.4 Water balance calculation
  • 9.3.5 Impact assessment
  • 9.4 Water footprint
  • 9.4.1 The relevance of WFA to industry
  • 9.4.2 Virtual water chain
  • 9.4.3 Assessment of green water footprint
  • 9.4.4 Assessment of blue water footprint
  • 9.4.5 Assessment of grey water footprint (GWF)
  • 9.4.6 Assessment of business water footprint (BWF)
  • 9.4.7 Life cycle-based assessment
  • 9.4.8 Application of water footprint assessment
  • 9.4.9 Benefits of WFA
  • 9.4.10 Water footprint assessment as a framework for corporate water sustainability
  • 9.4.11 International standards of water footprint assessment
  • 9.4.12 Case studies
  • 9.5 Industrial response to WF assessment
  • 9.6 Water disclosure document
  • 9.7 Benefits of water disclosure
  • 9.8 Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 10 Detection of Water Loss and Methods of Water Conservation in Industries
  • 10.1 Overview
  • 10.2 Getting started: Develop a water conservation strategy
  • 10.3 Detection of overuse
  • 10.3.1 Benchmarking
  • 10.4 Water audit
  • 10.4.1 Fundamentals of water audit
  • 10.4.2 Benefits of water audit
  • 10.4.3 Scopes and objectives of water audit
  • 10.4.4 Human resource requirements for water audit
  • 10.4.5 Corporate process in water audit
  • 10.4.6 Water audit processes
  • 10.4.7 Water audit software
  • 10.4.8 Industrial response to water audit report
  • 10.4.9 Real loss management
  • 10.5 Methods of water conservation
  • 10.5.1 Water use management
  • 10.5.2 Demand management
  • 10.5.3 Changing the water use behaviour
  • 10.5.4 Water use assessment
  • 10.5.5 Reduced consumption and water loss
  • 10.5.6 Reuse and recycle
  • 10.5.7 Zero liquid discharge plants
  • 10.6 Water saving in agriculture industries
  • 10.6.1 Soil moisture sensors
  • 10.6.2 Rain sensors
  • 10.6.3 Drip/micro-irrigation
  • 10.6.4 Sprinkler heads
  • 10.6.5 Centre pivot irrigation
  • 10.7 Rainwater harvesting
  • 10.7.1 Introduction
  • 10.7.2 Regulations and guidelines
  • 10.7.3 Why industries should take up RWH
  • 10.7.4 Components of RWH
  • 10.7.5 Rainwater harvesting potential
  • 10.7.6 Artificial recharge of groundwater
  • 10.7.7 Surface runoff harvesting
  • 10.7.8 Issues in RWH
  • 10.7.9 Maintenance of RWH system
  • 10.7.10 Constraints in adopting a rainwater harvesting system
  • 10.7.11 Promotion and further development of rainwater utilisation
  • 10.7.12 Example of an industrial RWH
  • 10.8 Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 11 Corporate Social Responsibility: Way Ahead in Water and Human Rights
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Public policy on CSR
  • 11.3 CSR policy of corporations
  • 11.4 Addressing water in CSR
  • 11.4.1 Water security
  • 11.4.2 Drinking water and sanitation
  • 11.4.3 Ecological development
  • 11.5 CSR management framework
  • 11.5.1 Policy
  • 11.5.2 Procedure
  • 11.5.3 Institutional arrangement
  • 11.5.4 Partnership and stakeholders' engagement
  • 11.5.5 Reporting
  • 11.6 CSR initiatives in the water sector
  • 11.7 International standards and guidelines
  • 11.8 Case studies
  • 11.8.1 Coca-Cola
  • 11.8.2 Nike
  • 11.8.3 Swiss Re Group
  • 11.8.4 Molson Coors
  • 11.8.5 Levi Strauss & Co
  • 11.9 Future of CSR
  • 11.10 Conclusion
  • Note
  • Bibliography
  • Glossary
  • Annexure
  • Index
  • EULA

Preface


The online edition of Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word 'stewardship' as 'the activity or job of protecting and being responsible for something'. This goes a long way towards explaining the subject matter of this book, that is, the responsibility of the corporate world to society by way of water stewardship; which, in recent times, has become an essential part of corporate management termed corporate water stewardship (CSW).

In 1776, Adam Smith introduced the concept of the 'invisible hand' in his book The Wealth of Nations, which instantly became the driving force of industrialisation and capitalism. The philosophy propounds that every individual strives to make as much money as he can; he neither intends to promote public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it "he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was not a part of his intention. The fact that it was not a part of his intention does not always worsen the situation for the society. By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it. I have never known much good have been done by those who affected to trade for the public good" (italics mine). What Adam Smith could not have foreseen two and a half centuries ago is the ambivalence of rapid industrialisation, which is plainly visible now: Aside from accelerating modernization (see Chaplin's Modern Times), the invisible hand is surreptitiously leading the world to unliveable conditions (which is hardly surprising, seeing that the maximum impetus to technological advancement came from the two World Wars and the Cold War that followed).

It is high time for the world to become aware of the water problem before the problem becomes irreversible. This book aims to promote such awareness, and I hope that my Muse will grant me such simplicity so that my readers can identify with the subject in hand and the book may acquire another status - not that of a polemic, nor of a mere source of topical reference but of turning it into a well-described text with an attempt to present it to, and make it understood by large numbers of the public; that, then, is my priority in which simplicity of presentation is just as important as the idea of water stewardship vis-à-vis industrialization.

When I started my career as a hydro-geologist in a state government department of India in the mid-1970s, the concept that water is a 'resource', like gold, for instance, was incomprehensible to users; in my home state, West Bengal, water is quite abundant, by virtue of an average rainfall of more than 1500?mm per year and groundwater level close enough to the surface to make dug wells and tube wells affordable even to low-income groups. The West Bengal landscape is dotted by huge waterbodies used for irrigation and fisheries. Most of the rivers are perennial and navigable in the rainy season. Availability of usable water was taken for granted, except in the relatively thinly populated western districts, which are chronically draught-prone. The Gangetic alluvial plain is one of the richest aquifers in the world. During the 1970s, the government of West Bengal was implementing the 'Minor Irrigation Policy' by installing thousands of deep and shallow tube wells across the state. Groundwater was exploited as an apparently inexhaustible resource and was made available to small and marginal farmers at subsidised rates. It was a boon to the farmers. Needless to say, however, such good times do not last forever. By the end of the 1980s, the water problem was first noticed when arsenic in toxic concentrations was detected in the groundwater of eastern districts. It was also observed that groundwater levels had gone down in many areas, so opportunistically, many privately owned irrigation tube wells came up and farmers had to purchase water at a premium. This was the time when water started becoming an unorganised business sector not just in West Bengal but in India as a whole.

It was during these times of rising water problems that I visited some of the other states of India, some of which differed from West Bengal in terms of hydrogeological conditions and, therefore, water culture in general. The groundwater level in some states was so deep that heavy-duty submersible pumps were required to lift water from low-yielding aquifers. Those states are still suffering from a chronic shortage of water due to over-extraction, erratic rainfall and poor aquifer storage. In my home state too, the hydrological scenario has changed rapidly under the pressure of the minor irrigation sector; aquifer levels went far below the centrifugal pumping limits pushing extraction costs beyond the affordability of small and marginal farmers, who constitute the vast majority of the agricultural sector. Heavy industry was not a big player in the water market at that time because their number in West Bengal was lower compared to other states. Heavy industries started exploring West Bengal prospects in the 1990s, and it was land, not water, which was the main hurdle. Resistance to industrialisation came mainly from small and marginal farmers who, as mentioned earlier, constitute the majority and depended almost solely on agriculture for livelihood; farmer resistance, therefore, had the support of the civil society. Consequently, industries were allotted land in non-agricultural belts, that is in hard-rock or laterite-covered areas deficient in water. Though the land was made available, water scarcity of this land compelled industries to take appropriate measures to secure their water supply, which meant industries had to draw water from distal aquifers and rivers, which in turn, formed the lifeline of the agrarian population in the source region. It soon became clear that industries could take water for granted. Perforce, therefore, industrialists had to assure rural people that industries would not snatch their glass of water and, for a substantive assurance campaign, industrialists had to undertake a quantified assessment of water like any other valuable resource. Industry, agriculture and society thus became entwined in issues relating to water; the issues being over-withdrawal, quality deterioration by contamination, and monopolisation of water sources.

In agriculture-based economies of South and Southeast Asia, industrialisation collided head on with farming communities and domestic water consumption. What was once considered to be a boon now became a polarising force separating two fundamentally important economic sectors: agriculture and manufacturing. The only way to surmount, or at least mitigate the divisive force of water is informed management of water distribution, that is, water stewardship. With hindsight, it can be appreciated that the modified avatar of water was an inevitable consequence of the steam-powered Industrial Revolution set in motion by colonising countries. Moreover, there is also the climate change set in motion by industrialisation, compounding the job of water stewardship.

The British Geological Survey document, Groundwater Information Sheet on The Impact of Industrial Activity (Water Aid, 2008) termed industries as an environmental pressure. It claims that industries draw much more water than they consume and are fraught with polluted effluent discharge to the environment. Untreated wastewater has the potential to cause irreversible damage to the ecosystem. As an instrument of economic development, industries need to act as facilitators of social wellbeing; this is a tough task, but it is crucial to sustainability. There are laws and enforcement machinery, however, to compel industries to move on the right track. In developed countries and also in some developing countries, there are stringent laws to compel industries to ensure pollution-free discharge. But safeguarding the remaining water reserve is not enough. Usable water like any other geological resource is finite, but population growth is unbounded. Water stewardship is mandated to keep economic growth running apace with growing population.

The introductory chapter (Chapter 1) of this book provides an overview of the status of global water, how it is shared by different sectors of the society like domestic, agriculture and industry, and the various effects forced upon the ecosystem due to such sharing processes. The introduction also deals with other topics like why water is a critical business issue for companies and why water crisis is a risk to their operations and brands. The chapter also discusses how industries should manage water from an ethical standpoint and how water should be priced and evaluated. Pre-war industries, and especially the war industries during World War II, operated without restraint; but now industries are facing social and political pressure to operate under regulating norms. Since manufacturing industries are major consumers of fresh water, it is incumbent upon them to foster green growth through water stewardship.

In Chapter 2 global trends of business are put into perspective against the backdrop of water crisis; that is, how business relates to global water crisis and how increased consumption leads to conflicts as a consequence of population growth; the impact of the ever-increasing demand of water for industrial growth is also discussed. Also offered for discussion are examples of water-related conflicts in different parts of the world. The...

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