Maidens, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity

Collected Essays I
 
 
Mohr Siebeck (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 13. Juli 2017
  • |
  • 501 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-16-155438-4 (ISBN)
 
In this work, Jan N. Bremmer aims to bring together the worlds of early Christianity and those of ancient history and classical literature - worlds that still all too rarely interlock. Contextualising the life and literature of the early Christians in their Greco-Roman environment, he focusses on four areas. A first section looks at more general aspects of early Christianity: the name of the Christians, their religious and social capital, prophecy and the place of widows and upper-class women in the Christian movement. Second, the chronology and place of composition of the early apocryphal Acts of the Apostles and Pseudo-Clementines are newly determined by paying close attention to their doctrinal contents, but also, innovatively, to their onomastics and social vocabulary. The author also analyses the frequent use of magic in the Acts and explains the prominence of women by comparing the Acts to the Greek novel. Third, an investigation into the theme of the tours of hell suggests a new chronological order, shows that the Christian tours were indebted to both Greek and Jewish models, and illustrates that in the course of time the genre dropped a large part of its Jewish heritage. The fourth and final section concentrates on the most famous and intriguing report of an ancient martyrdom: the Passion of Perpetua. It pays special attention to the motivation and visions of Perpetua, which are analyzed not by taking recourse to modern theories such as psychoanalysis, but by looking to the world in which Perpetua lived, both Christian and pagan. It is only by seeing the early Christians in their ancient world that we might begin to understand them and their emerging communities.
  • Englisch
  • Tübingen
  • |
  • Deutschland
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 5,03 MB
978-3-16-155438-4 (9783161554384)
10.1628/978-3-16-155438-4
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
2 - Preface [Seite 8]
3 - Contents [Seite 16]
4 - Abbreviations [Seite 18]
5 - Section I: Aspects of Early Christianity [Seite 20]
5.1 - Chapter 1: Why Did Jesus' Followers Call Themselves 'Christians'? [Seite 22]
5.1.1 - 1. The Importance of Christ [Seite 22]
5.1.2 - 2. Christian and pagan adhesion to one god [Seite 24]
5.1.3 - 3. Jesus' followers as 'Christians' [Seite 26]
5.2 - Chapter 2: The Social and Religious Capital of the Early Christians [Seite 32]
5.2.1 - 1. Charity [Seite 35]
5.2.2 - 2. Interconnectedness [Seite 37]
5.2.3 - 3. Family aspects [Seite 39]
5.2.4 - 4. Bonding and bridging [Seite 44]
5.2.5 - 5. Religious capital [Seite 47]
5.2.6 - Conclusion [Seite 50]
5.3 - Chapter 3: Why Did Early Christianity Attract Upper-class Women? [Seite 52]
5.4 - Chapter 4: Pauper or Patroness: the Widow in theEarly Christian Church [Seite 62]
5.4.1 - 1. Jesus and the first Palestine congregations [Seite 63]
5.4.2 - 2. The Greek world [Seite 66]
5.4.3 - 3. The Roman world [Seite 70]
5.4.4 - 4. Syria and Egypt [Seite 73]
5.4.5 - 5. The Christian Empire [Seite 75]
5.4.6 - 6. Conclusions [Seite 82]
5.5 - Chapter 5: Peregrinus' Christian Career [Seite 84]
5.6 - Chapter 6: The Domestication of Early Christian Prophecy [Seite 100]
5.6.1 - 1. The situation in Paul's time [Seite 100]
5.6.2 - 2. The situation around AD 100 [Seite 102]
5.6.3 - 3. Montanism or the revival of prophecy [Seite 106]
5.6.4 - 4. Preliminary conclusions [Seite 110]
5.6.5 - 5. The Ascension of Isaiah and ecstatic prophecy [Seite 111]
6 - Section II: Studies in the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostlesand the Pseudo-Clementines [Seite 116]
6.1 - Chapter 7: Women in the Acts of John [Seite 118]
6.1.1 - 1. Lycomedes and Cleopatra (19-29) [Seite 119]
6.1.2 - 2. Andronicus and Drusiana (63-86) [Seite 121]
6.1.3 - 3. Old women and widows (30-7) [Seite 123]
6.1.4 - 4. Conclusion [Seite 128]
6.1.5 - Appendix: date and place of composition of the Acts of John [Seite 130]
6.2 - Chapter 8: Man, Magic, and Martyrdom in the Acts of Andrew [Seite 134]
6.2.1 - 1. Males and females [Seite 139]
6.2.2 - 2. Magic and exorcism [Seite 141]
6.2.3 - 3. Martyrdom [Seite 148]
6.3 - Chapter 9: Aspects of the Acts of Peter: Women, Magic, Place and Date [Seite 152]
6.3.1 - 1. Women [Seite 152]
6.3.2 - 2. Demons and magic [Seite 159]
6.3.3 - 3. Place of origin and date of the APt [Seite 162]
6.4 - Chapter 10: Magic, Martyrdom and Women's Liberation in the Acts of Paul and Thecla [Seite 168]
6.4.1 - 1. Paul and Thecla in Iconium [Seite 169]
6.4.2 - 3. Paul and Thecla in Antioch [Seite 177]
6.4.3 - 4. Composition, name, date, place of origin, author, and aims of the AP [Seite 182]
6.5 - Chapter 11: The Acts of Thomas: Place, Date and Women [Seite 186]
6.5.1 - 1. Women [Seite 190]
6.5.2 - 2. Women and the AAA [Seite 196]
6.6 - Chapter 12: Conversion in the Oldest Apocryphal Acts [Seite 200]
6.6.1 - 1. The Acts of John [Seite 201]
6.6.2 - 2. The Acts of Peter [Seite 206]
6.6.3 - 3. The Acts of Paul [Seite 209]
6.6.4 - 4. Conclusions and general observations [Seite 212]
6.7 - Chapter 13: Magic in the Apocryphal Acts [Seite 216]
6.7.1 - 1. Realities and representations of magic [Seite 217]
6.7.2 - 2. Exorcism [Seite 221]
6.7.3 - 3. The confrontation between the apostle Peter and Simon Magus [Seite 227]
6.7.4 - 4. Conclusions [Seite 235]
6.8 - Chapter 14: The Apocryphal Acts: Authors, Place, Time and Readership [Seite 238]
6.8.1 - 1. Authorship, text and message [Seite 238]
6.8.2 - 2. The chronology and place of origin of the AAA [Seite 240]
6.8.3 - 3. Readership [Seite 244]
6.9 - Chapter 15: Pseudo-Clementines: Texts, Dates, Places, Authors and Magic [Seite 254]
6.9.1 - 1. Text [Seite 254]
6.9.2 - 2. Place and Date of the Grundschrift, Homilies and Recognitions [Seite 258]
6.9.3 - 3. The Author of the Grundschrift [Seite 260]
6.9.4 - 4. Magic [Seite 262]
6.10 - Chapter 16: Apion and Anoubion in the Homilies [Seite 270]
6.10.1 - 1. Athenodorus [Seite 270]
6.10.2 - 2. Annoubion [Seite 271]
6.10.3 - 3. Appion [Seite 275]
6.10.4 - 4. Conclusion [Seite 283]
7 - Section III: Apocalypses and Tours of Hell [Seite 286]
7.1 - Chapter 17: The Apocalypse of Peter: Greek or Jewish? [Seite 288]
7.2 - Chapter 18: The Apocalypse of Peter: Place, Date and Punishments [Seite 300]
7.2.1 - 1. The Date and Place of the Apocalypse of Peter [Seite 300]
7.2.2 - 2. Crimes and punishments [Seite 303]
7.2.3 - 3. The nature and chronology of the tours of hell [Seite 310]
7.3 - Chapter 19: Christian Hell: From the Apocalypse of Peter to the Apocalypse of Paul [Seite 314]
7.3.1 - 1. Date and place of origin [Seite 317]
7.3.2 - 2. Old and new sins and sinners [Seite 321]
7.3.3 - 3. Punishments [Seite 328]
7.3.4 - 4. Conclusion [Seite 331]
7.4 - Chapter 20: Tours of Hell: Greek, Jewish, Roman and Early Christian [Seite 332]
7.4.1 - 1. The Greeks [Seite 333]
7.4.2 - 2. Palestine [Seite 336]
7.4.3 - 3. Rome [Seite 338]
7.4.4 - 4. Early Christianity [Seite 342]
7.4.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 347]
7.5 - Chapter 21: Descents to Hell and Ascents to Heavenin Apocalyptic Literature [Seite 348]
7.5.1 - 1. Descents in the classical world [Seite 349]
7.5.2 - 2. An Enochic interlude [Seite 351]
7.5.3 - 3. A descent in Rome [Seite 353]
7.5.4 - 4. Descents in early Christianity [Seite 354]
7.5.5 - 5. Ascent to heaven [Seite 357]
7.5.5.1 - 5.1 The ascent of the soul to heaven: round trips and single journeys [Seite 357]
7.5.5.2 - 5.2 Roundtrips to heaven in vision or 'reality' [Seite 360]
7.5.5.3 - 5.3 Ascent to immortal heavenly life [Seite 362]
7.5.6 - 6. Conclusion [Seite 363]
8 - Section IV: The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas [Seite 366]
8.1 - Chapter 22: Perpetua and her Diary: Authenticity, Family and Visions [Seite 368]
8.1.1 - 1. The Acta martyrum [Seite 369]
8.1.2 - 2. The text of the Passion of Perpetua [Seite 372]
8.1.3 - 3. Perpetua and her family [Seite 376]
8.1.4 - 4. Perpetua's visions [Seite 383]
8.1.4.1 - 4.1 Perpetua's Ascent to Heaven [Seite 385]
8.1.4.2 - 4.2 Perpetua and her brother Dinocrates [Seite 392]
8.1.4.3 - 4.3 The fight against the Egyptian [Seite 398]
8.1.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 405]
8.2 - Chapter 23: Felicitas: The Martyrdom of a Young African Woman [Seite 406]
8.3 - Chapter 24: The Motivation of Martyrs: Perpetua and the Palestinians [Seite 422]
8.3.1 - 1. The penultimate day [Seite 424]
8.3.2 - 2. The preparations for the execution [Seite 427]
8.3.3 - 3. The motivation of martyrs [Seite 435]
8.4 - Chapter 25: Passio Perpetuae 2, 16 and 17 [Seite 442]
8.4.1 - 2.1-2 [Seite 442]
8.4.2 - 2.3 [Seite 450]
8.4.3 - 16.1 [Seite 451]
8.4.4 - 16.2 [Seite 454]
8.4.5 - 17 [Seite 456]
8.5 - Chapter 26: The Vision of Saturus in the Passio Perpetuae [Seite 458]
8.5.1 - 1. Saturus and (the text of) his vision [Seite 458]
8.5.2 - 2. Saturus' welcome in heaven [Seite 461]
8.5.3 - 3. Conversation with the clergy on earth [Seite 467]
8.5.4 - 4. Conclusion [Seite 472]
8.6 - Chapter 27: Contextualising Heaven in Third-Century North Africa [Seite 474]
8.6.1 - 1. The Passio Sanctorum Mariani et Iacobi [Seite 475]
8.6.2 - 2. The court scene [Seite 476]
8.6.3 - 3. The heavenly landscape [Seite 479]
8.6.4 - 4. The fountain and the cup [Seite 481]
8.6.5 - 5. Marian's heaven [Seite 485]
9 - Acknowledgements [Seite 488]
10 - Index of names, places and passages [Seite 490]
DNB DDC Sachgruppen

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

169,00 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen