The Commentary of Origen on the Gospel of St Matthew

 
 
Oxford University Press
  • erschienen am 23. August 2018
 
  • Sonstiges
  • |
  • Verpackungseinheit
  • |
  • 792 Seiten
978-0-19-966907-3 (ISBN)
 
Origen was the greatest intellectual in the third century church, and the most influential of all the Greek Church Fathers. His writings covered many different subjects, including commentaries on most of the books of the New Testament and many of the Old Testament. Late in his life, in the mid-third century, he wrote a Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew. This was the first commentary ever written on this Gospel so far as we know. It covered the entire
Gospel in twenty-five books. Only eight of these books have been preserved in the Greek language in which Origen wrote. A Latin translation made in the sixth century has preserved the contents of several additional books. There are, furthermore, numerous fragments from the commentary preserved in ancient writings.


Of this mass of material, only five of the eight books preserved in Greek have ever been translated into English, plus one fragment. This new translation, therefore, is the first translation into English of the entirety of the Greek and Latin remains of this important commentary, including most of the fragments. The translation is in modern English and includes brief annotations. The introduction sets the commentary in the context of Origen's life. It is his last preserved exegetical work.
Evidence is presented that suggests that it post-dates the Contra Celsum, long considered Origen's last work. The Commentary on Matthew is a very important work, therefore, giving us access to Origen's most mature theological thinking.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • Höhe: 244 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 167 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 55 mm
  • 1527 gr
978-0-19-966907-3 (9780199669073)

Ronald E. Heine (PhD, University of Illinois) is Professor of Bible and Christian Ministry at Northwest Christian University. His publications include Origen: Scholarship in the Service of the Church (2010), The Commentaries of Origen and Jerome on St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians (2002), and an edition of Gregory of Nyssa's Treatise on the Inscriptions of the Psalms (1995).
Volume I
Abbreviations
Introduction
Book 10: (Matthew 13:36-14:15)
Book 11: (Matthew 14:15-15:39)
Book 12: (Matthew 16:1-17:9)
Book 13: (Matthew 17:10-18:18)
Book 14: (Matthew 18:19-19:11)
Book 15: (Matthew 19:12-20:16)
Book 16: (Matthew 20:17-21:22)
Book 17: (Matthew 21:23-22:33)
Selected Fragments on Matthew 1:1-13:35 and Matthew 28
Bibliography of Modern Sources
Volume II
Part I: The Vetus Interpretatio (On Matthew 16:13-22:33)
Book 12: (Matthew 16:13-17:9)
Book 13: (Matthew 17:10-18:18)
Book 14: (Matthew 18:19-19:11)
Book 15: (Matthew 19:12-20:16)
Book 16: (Matthew 20:17-21:22)
Book 17: (Matthew 21:23-22:33)
Part II: The Series Commentariorum (On Matthew 22:34-27:66)
Series 1-8: (Matthew 22:34-46)
Series 9-28: (Matthew 23)
Series 29-62: (Matthew 24)
Series 63-73: (Matthew 25)
Series 74-114: (Matthew 26)
Series 115-145: (Matthew 27)
Indices
The quality of Heine's translation of the Greek and Latin critical editions is noteworthy, for in both cases he simultaneously offers a lucid, easy-to-read translation and shows striking consistency in his translation of technical vocabulary from Origen's corpus... There is no question that the countless hours that Heine has laboured on this project form a profound act of service to students of Origen, young and old, lay, ecclesial and academic... That these
volumes form a labour of love is evident in the expression that they give to Origen's exegetical genius and pastoral heart. * Alexander H. Pierce, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana, Journal of Ecclesiastical History * Ronald Heine makes a first-rate contribution to Origen scholarship, moving the conversation forward through clear historical argumentation based on textual evidence. His examination of Origen's method of reading Matthew deserves attention from those interested in patristic hermeneutics. Of course, for the general reader of the church fathers, Heine's translation is a jewel, revealing dazzling facets of Origen's most mature mind. Scholars of Matthew's Gospel and
historical theologians should also take notice. * Owen Kelly, Southeastern Theological Review *
Dewey Decimal Classfication (DDC)

Versand in 15-20 Tagen

301,87 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
In den Warenkorb