Case Studies and Guidelines for Energy Efficient Communities.

A Guidebook on Successful Urban Energy Planning.
 
 
Fraunhofer IRB Verlag
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 16. Dezember 2013
  • |
  • 302 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-8167-9123-2 (ISBN)
 
What are the barriers that prevent us from achieving our long-term energy goals in cities or, more generally, in our built environment? What can be learned from successful Case Studies in neighborhoods, districts or cities? Is there any economically viable way to apply these advancements to whole cities?
This Annex 51 wants to provide such answers, based on the evaluation of over 20 Case Studies carried out within the 11 participating countries and elaborated in the form of this guidebook on successful local energy planning. In eight chapters and several detailed attachments a manual to derive municipal energy master plans for towns or cities on one hand, and local neighborhood energy plans on the other is presented, which serves as a guideline for municipal decision makers, real estate developers and urban planners as well.
  • Englisch
  • Stuttgart
  • |
  • Deutschland
num. col. illus., tab.
  • 8,60 MB
978-3-8167-9123-2 (9783816791232)
3816791239 (3816791239)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
1.1 - Interior titel [Seite 2]
1.2 - Imprint [Seite 3]
2 - Preface [Seite 4]
3 - Acknowledgements [Seite 7]
4 - List of Abbreviations [Seite 9]
5 - Energy Related Abbreviations [Seite 10]
6 - Table of Contents [Seite 11]
7 - 1 Introduction [Seite 16]
7.1 - 1.1 Climate science and policy background [Seite 16]
7.2 - 1.2 Implications for communities [Seite 16]
7.3 - 1.3 Systems approach [Seite 17]
7.4 - 1.4 International co-operation and Annex 51 approach [Seite 19]
7.5 - 1.5 Guidebook approach [Seite 20]
7.6 - 1.6 A few words on terminology [Seite 22]
8 - 2 Local Energy & Climate Change Policy [Seite 25]
8.1 - 2.1 Local energy planning as a key factor in climate protection policy [Seite 25]
8.2 - 2.2 Legal and policy frameworks [Seite 26]
8.3 - 2.3 Financial frameworks [Seite 35]
8.3.1 - 2.3.1 Funds [Seite 35]
8.3.2 - 2.3.2 Grants [Seite 38]
8.3.3 - 2.3.3 Feed-in tariffs [Seite 39]
8.3.4 - 2.3.4 Subsidies [Seite 43]
8.3.5 - 2.3.5 Tax schemes [Seite 44]
8.3.6 - 2.3.6 Additional options [Seite 47]
8.4 - 2.4 Voluntary agreements and networks [Seite 47]
8.5 - 2.5 General conclusions on legal and financial frameworks [Seite 49]
9 - 3 LocalE nergy Planning Methods: From Demandto Future-proof Solutions [Seite 52]
9.1 - 3.1 The transition process [Seite 52]
9.1.1 - 3.1.1 Leadership models [Seite 53]
9.2 - 3.2 The local energy planning transition process [Seite 56]
9.3 - 3.3 Step 1 Create an energy and emissions inventory or balance [Seite 57]
9.3.1 - 3.3.1 A few words on data [Seite 57]
9.3.2 - 3.3.1 A few words on data [Seite 57]
9.3.3 - 3.3.2 A few words on inventories [Seite 58]
9.3.4 - 3.3.3 Data sources to profile energy demand [Seite 60]
9.3.5 - 3.3.4 Other types of data sets to contextualize energy demand and supply [Seite 63]
9.3.6 - 3.3.5 Data sources to profile conventional energy supply [Seite 64]
9.3.7 - 3.3.6 Data sources to profile renewable energy supply [Seite 64]
9.4 - 3.4 Step 2 Engage stakeholders, create a vision and set targets [Seite 67]
9.4.1 - 3.4.1 Stakeholder analysis [Seite 67]
9.4.2 - 3.4.2 The transition arena [Seite 69]
9.4.3 - 3.4.3 The energy working group [Seite 69]
9.4.4 - 3.4.4 Create a vision [Seite 70]
9.4.5 - 3.4.5 Set targets [Seite 71]
9.5 - 3.5 Step 3 Assess opportunities and develop scenarios [Seite 72]
9.5.1 - 3.5.1 Assess opportunities [Seite 72]
9.5.2 - 3.5.2 Supporting indicators [Seite 73]
9.5.3 - 3.5.3 Scenarios [Seite 74]
9.5.4 - 3.5.4 Backcasting and forecasting [Seite 75]
9.5.5 - 3.5.5 Roadmaps [Seite 77]
9.5.6 - 3.5.6 Charrette [Seite 79]
9.6 - 3.6 Step 4 Create municipal energy master plans and neighbourhood energy plans [Seite 80]
9.6.1 - 3.6.1 Municipal energy master plan [Seite 80]
9.6.2 - 3.6.2 Neighbourhood energy plans [Seite 82]
9.7 - 3.7 Step 5 Implementation, monitoring, evaluation and feedback [Seite 86]
9.7.1 - 3.7.1 Process design instruments [Seite 87]
9.7.2 - 3.7.2 Integrated management strategies [Seite 88]
9.7.3 - 3.7.3 Process management co-ordinator [Seite 89]
9.7.4 - 3.7.4 Responsibilities of municipal departments [Seite 89]
9.7.5 - 3.7.5 Co-ordinating the energy working group [Seite 90]
9.7.6 - 3.7.6 Monitoring [Seite 91]
9.7.7 - 3.7.7 Evaluation and feedback [Seite 92]
9.8 - 3.8 Technical improvement options, economic feasibility [Seite 94]
9.8.1 - 3.8.1 Technology and policy approaches available to governments [Seite 94]
9.8.2 - 3.8.2 Technologies available to the developer / contractor [Seite 98]
9.8.3 - 3.8.3 Technologies available to the occupant [Seite 105]
10 - 4 Community Energyand Emissions Inventoryand Modelling Tools to Support Local Energy Planning (LEP) [Seite 107]
10.1 - 4.1 Introduction [Seite 107]
10.2 - 4.2 The scope of LEP and the need for inventories and models [Seite 107]
10.3 - 4.3 Energy and GHG emissions inventories [Seite 109]
10.3.1 - 4.3.1 Selected examples of inventories and balancing tools in practical application [Seite 109]
10.4 - 4.4 Energy modelling approaches [Seite 112]
10.5 - 4.5 Examples of models in development and practical application [Seite 116]
10.6 - 4.6 User needs [Seite 124]
10.7 - 4.7 Selecting a modelling approach [Seite 125]
10.8 - 4.8 Communicating the modelling concept [Seite 127]
10.9 - 4.9 Perspectives on future directions [Seite 128]
10.9.1 - Web-Sources for Information on Municipal Energy Inventory Tools [Seite 130]
11 - 5 The District Energy Concept Adviser (D-ECA): Software from IEA EBC Annex 51 to Support District Energy System Planning [Seite 131]
11.1 - 5.1 The tool in brief [Seite 131]
11.2 - 5.2 Background and aim [Seite 131]
11.3 - 5.3 Tool sections [Seite 133]
11.4 - 5.4 How to use the main sections [Seite 134]
11.4.1 - 5.4.1 Performance rating [Seite 134]
11.4.2 - 5.4.2 Case studies of energy efficient districts [Seite 136]
11.4.3 - 5.4.3 Energy efficient strategies and technologies [Seite 138]
11.4.4 - 5.4.4 Energy assessment of districts [Seite 139]
11.5 - 5.5 User guide [Seite 147]
11.6 - 5.6 Test calculations to assess the accuracy of the calculation tool [Seite 147]
11.6.1 - 5.6.1 Evaluation results of the exemplary district Stuttgart-Burgholzhof [Seite 150]
11.7 - 5.7 Download source [Seite 152]
12 - 6 Energy Efficient Neighbourhood Case Studies [Seite 154]
12.1 - 6.1 Neighbourhood case studies [Seite 154]
12.2 - 6.2 Successful neighbourhood developments [Seite 154]
12.2.1 - 6.2.1 Energy efficiency is profitable [Seite 154]
12.2.2 - 6.2.2 The decision making process [Seite 156]
12.2.3 - 6.2.3 Planning urban development projects [Seite 160]
12.2.4 - 6.2.4 Implementation [Seite 162]
12.2.5 - 6.2.5 Barriers [Seite 164]
12.3 - 6.3 Lowering energy demand efficiently [Seite 166]
12.3.1 - 6.3.1 Single buildings or whole neighbourhoods? [Seite 166]
12.3.2 - 6.3.2 Increased comfort paid for through energy efficiency [Seite 167]
12.3.3 - 6.3.3 Monitoring and evaluation [Seite 171]
12.4 - 6.4 Lessons learned from neighbourhood case studies [Seite 173]
12.4.1 - 6.4.1 Why districts or neighbourhoods? [Seite 173]
12.4.2 - 6.4.2 An integrated planning approach [Seite 173]
12.4.3 - 6.4.3 Organization [Seite 174]
12.4.4 - 6.4.4 Quality agreement and control [Seite 174]
12.4.5 - 6.4.5 Policy instruments [Seite 174]
12.4.6 - 6.4.6 Planning for lowest cost [Seite 175]
12.4.7 - 6.4.7 Planning tools [Seite 175]
12.4.8 - 6.4.8 Information and education [Seite 175]
12.4.9 - 6.4.9 Involving residents [Seite 176]
12.4.10 - 6.4.10 Energy efficiency [Seite 176]
12.4.11 - 6.4.11 Technological achievements and solutions [Seite 176]
12.4.12 - 6.4.12 Monitoring [Seite 177]
12.5 - APPENDIX to Chapter 6 [Seite 178]
13 - 7 Energy Efficient City Case Studies [Seite 190]
13.1 - 7.1 Introduction [Seite 190]
13.2 - 7.2 Case studies [Seite 190]
13.3 - 7.3 Vision and targets [Seite 194]
13.3.1 - 7.3.1 Realistic vision and targets [Seite 194]
13.3.2 - 7.3.2 Linking short-term actions with long-term targets [Seite 197]
13.4 - 7.4 Process and organization [Seite 198]
13.4.1 - 7.4.1 Continuous process [Seite 198]
13.4.2 - 7.4.2 Integrated approach [Seite 202]
13.5 - 7.5 Support and involvement [Seite 204]
13.5.1 - 7.5.1 Creating support [Seite 204]
13.5.2 - 7.5.2 Involving the right people at the right time [Seite 207]
13.5.3 - 7.5.3 Involving the public [Seite 209]
13.5.4 - 7.5.4 Involving the real estate industry [Seite 211]
13.6 - 7.6 Knowledge and risk management [Seite 212]
13.6.1 - 7.6.1 Sharing knowledge [Seite 212]
13.7 - 7.7 Co-benefits [Seite 215]
13.7.1 - 7.7.1 Economic benefits [Seite 216]
13.7.2 - 7.7.2 Social benefits [Seite 217]
13.7.3 - 7.7.3 Environmental benefits [Seite 217]
13.7.4 - APPENDIX to Chapter 7 [Seite 218]
14 - 8 Summary and Conclusions [Seite 225]
14.1 - 8.1 Key results and implications [Seite 226]
14.1.1 - 8.1.1 Neighborhood energy planning [Seite 226]
14.1.2 - 8.1.2 Municipal energy planning [Seite 227]
14.1.3 - 8.1.3 Computer-based planning tools [Seite 228]
14.1.4 - 8.1.4 Legislative frameworks [Seite 228]
14.2 - 8.2 Municipal energy transition process [Seite 229]
14.3 - 8.3 Eight guidelines for local energy planning success [Seite 233]
14.4 - 8.4 Concluding remarks [Seite 238]
14.5 - 8.5 Where should we go from here? [Seite 238]
15 - List of References [Seite 239]
16 - Attachments [Seite 244]
16.1 - Attachment A. Primary Energy and GHG Performance of Energy Systems [Seite 245]
16.2 - Attachment B. Green Building Rating Systems [Seite 251]
16.3 - Attachment C. Low-Energy, Passive House and Net-Zero Energy Buildings [Seite 253]
16.4 - Attachment D. Energy Generation from Renewable Sources [Seite 256]
16.5 - Attachment E. Economics of Energy Retrofitting and Energy Performance Contracting [Seite 259]
16.6 - Attachment F. Energy Benchmarking of Neighbourhoods [Seite 264]
16.7 - Attachment G. Energy Performance of Typical Cogeneration Systems [Seite 272]
16.8 - Attachment H. Municipal Energy and Emissions Inventories [Seite 279]
16.9 - Attachment I. Municipal Energy Improvement Opportunities [Seite 281]
16.10 - Attachment J. Planning Methods in Neighborhood or District Energy Planning [Seite 289]
16.10.1 - J.1 Thermal Energy Demand Data for Neighbourhood Planning [Seite 289]
16.10.2 - J.2 Thermal Energy Distribution [Seite 298]
16.10.3 - J.3 Neighborhood Archetypes Approach [Seite 302]
17 - Backcover [Seite 304]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

49,00 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok