The Handbook of Portuguese Linguistics

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 6. April 2016
  • |
  • 616 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-79174-5 (ISBN)
 
The Handbook of Portuguese Linguistics presents a comprehensive overview of research within the Brazilian and European variants of the Portuguese language. It includes chapters focusing on the key areas of linguistic study, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, linguistic change, language variation and contact, and acquisition.
* Essential reference work for scholars of Portuguese linguistics and Romance languages
* Chapters written by an international team of research specialists highlight both the consensus and the controversies within the various subfields of Portuguese linguistics
* Examines Portuguese linguistics in relation to syntax, phonology, morphology, semantics/pragmatics, acquisition, and sociolinguistics
* Written in an accessible overview style and designed for advanced students and current scholars in the field alike
* Essential reference work for scholars of Portuguese linguistics and Romance languages
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 14,82 MB
978-1-118-79174-5 (9781118791745)
1118791746 (1118791746)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Title Page
  • Table of Contents
  • Notes on Contributors
  • 1 History and Current Setting
  • 1. From Latin to Portuguese-Main Linguistic changes and conditioning factors
  • 2. Old and Middle Portuguese
  • 3. The historical dimension of Brazilian Portuguese
  • 4. European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese: main contrasting features and changes
  • 5. Conclusions
  • REFERENCES
  • 2 European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Surface similarities between the two varieties
  • 3. Two systems of clitic placement in Portuguese
  • 4. Divergences in the word order of declarative sentences
  • 5. Word order in contrastive (or emphatic) focus constructions
  • 6. Word Order in wh-questions
  • 7. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 3 Portuguese in Contact
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The emergence of pidgin and creole languages and the process of irregular language transmission
  • 3. Brazil
  • 4. Africa
  • 5. Asia
  • 6. Portuguese in contact with Spanish
  • 7. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 4 A Comparative Study of the Sounds of European and Brazilian Portuguese
  • 1. Consonants
  • 2. Vowels
  • REFERENCES
  • 5 Phonological Processes Affecting Vowels
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Unstressed vowel neutralization
  • 3. Pretonic Mid-Vowel Harmony in BP
  • 4. Nasal vowels and nasal diphthongs
  • 5. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 6 Syllable Structure
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The structure of the Portuguese syllable
  • 3. Syllable structure and syllabification
  • 4. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 7 Main Stress and Secondary Stress in Brazilian and European Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. A note on the history of Portuguese stress
  • 3. Primary stress: the data
  • 4. The formal modeling of primary stress
  • 5. The syllable weight controversy
  • 6. Stress in compounds
  • 7. Secondary stress
  • 8. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 8 The Phonology-Syntax Interface
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Evidence for prosodic structure from Portuguese
  • 3. Construction of prosodic domains and the syntax-phonology interface
  • 4. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 9 Intonation in European and Brazilian Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction: Intonation and its functions in Portuguese
  • 2. Intonation and phrasing
  • 3. Intonation and focus
  • 4. Intonation and utterance types
  • 5. Intonation across varieties of Portuguese
  • 6. Portuguese intonation within Romance
  • Acknowledgements
  • REFERENCES
  • 10 The Phonology and Morphology of Word Formation
  • 1. Affixation
  • 2. Modification
  • 3. Compounding
  • 4. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 11 The Morphology and Phonology of Inflection
  • 1. Nominal inflection
  • 2. Verbal inflection
  • 3. Discussion
  • REFERENCES
  • 12 Clitic Pronouns
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Survey
  • 3. Clitic pronouns in European Portuguese
  • 4. Clitic pronouns in Brazilian Portuguese
  • 5. Final remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 13 The Null Subject Parameter and the Structure of the Sentence in European and Brazilian Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Null Subjects: distribution and licensing
  • 3. VS Order
  • 4. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 14 The Structure of DPs
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Deverbal nominalizations and the argument structure of nouns
  • 3. Entity/object nouns, PP modifiers and possessive constructions
  • 4. Adjectives: classes and positions
  • 5. DP-internal agreement and bare nouns
  • REFERENCES
  • 15 Wh-movement
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Interrogatives
  • 3. Relatives
  • 4. Clefting
  • 5. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 16 Null Objects and VP Ellipsis in European and Brazilian Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Null-Obj in EP and BP
  • 3. VP ellipsis in EP and BP
  • Acknowledgements
  • REFERENCES
  • 17 Passives and Se Constructions
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Participial passive constructions
  • 3. Se constructions
  • 4. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 18 Binding and Pronominal Forms in Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Pronominal forms in current Portuguese
  • 3. Binding domains in Portuguese
  • 4. Bound variables in Portuguese
  • 5. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 19 The Semantics of DPs
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Definites
  • 3. Indefinites
  • 4. Bare nominals
  • REFERENCES
  • 20 Lexical Semantics
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Lexical semantic representations
  • 3. Verb classes and alternations
  • 4. Final considerations
  • REFERENCES
  • 21 Tense and Aspect
  • 1. Time
  • 2. Aspect
  • 3. Epilogue
  • REFERENCES
  • 22 Mood and Modality
  • 1. This chapter
  • 2. Mood in Portuguese
  • 3. Modals in Portuguese
  • 4. Towards an integrated analysis of mood and modality
  • 5. Other issues to be explored
  • REFERENCES
  • 23 Some Issues in Negation in Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Canonical or "standard" negation
  • 3. Non-canonical sentence negation: NEG2 (dupla negação) and NEG3
  • 4. Negative concord and negative indefinites
  • 5. Metalinguistic negation
  • 6. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 24 Discourse Markers
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Properties of DMs
  • 3. Classes of DMs
  • 4. Final remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 25 From Latin to Portuguese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Syllable structure, sonority and moras: Their interaction in Latin, Hispano-Romance and Galician/Portuguese, and consequences for consonantal inventories
  • 3. More on the vocalic system: Oral and nasal vowels and diphthongs, reduction and metaphony
  • 4. Morphophonology: Contraction, grammaticalization and prosody
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • REFERENCES
  • 26 Main Morphosyntactic Changes and Grammaticalization Processes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Grammaticalization of verb forms and constructions
  • 3. Grammaticalization of nominal and pronominal categories
  • REFERENCES
  • 27 Main Syntactic Changes from a Principle-and-Parameters View
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Parametric changes in European Portuguese
  • 3. Syntactic changes from European to Brazilian Portuguese
  • 4. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 28 Main Current Processes of Phonological Variation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Vowel variation
  • 3. Consonant Variation
  • 4. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 29 Main Current Processes of Morphosyntactic Variation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Variable concord in Portuguese
  • 3. Variation related to the pronominal system
  • 4. Final remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • 30 Acquisition of Phonology
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Segments and phonological processes
  • 3. Syllables
  • 4. Stress
  • 5. Conclusion
  • REFERENCES
  • 31 Acquisition of Portuguese Syntax
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Word order, clause structure and the structure of the DP
  • 3. Acquisition of movement dependencies
  • 4. Acquisition of referential dependencies
  • REFERENCES
  • 32 Second Language Acquisition
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Generative second language acquisition
  • 3. Central issues
  • 4. Concluding remarks
  • REFERENCES
  • Index
  • End User License Agreement

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