China and Europe on the New Silk Road

Connecting Universities Across Eurasia
 
 
Oxford University Press
  • erschienen am 8. Oktober 2020
  • |
  • 448 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-19-259450-1 (ISBN)
 
The global order, based on international governance and multilateral trade mechanisms in the aftermath of the Second World War, is changing rapidly and creating waves of uncertainty. This is especially true in higher education, a field increasingly built on international cooperation and the free movement of students, academics, knowledge, and ideas. Meanwhile, China has announced its plans for a "New Silk Road" (NSR) and is developing its higher education and research systems at speed. In this book an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars from Europe, China, the USA, Russia, and Australia investigate how academic mobility and cooperation is taking shape along the New Silk Road and what difference it will make, if any, in the global higher education landscape. Opening chapters present the global context for the NSR, the development of Chinese universities along international models, and the history and outcomes of EU-China cooperation. The flows and patterns in academic cooperation along the NSR as they shape and have been shaped by China's universities are then explored in more detail. The conditions for Sino-foreign cooperation are discussed next, with an analysis of regulatory frameworks for cooperation, recognition, data, and privacy. Comparative work follows on the cultural traditions and academic values, similarities, and differences between Sinic and Anglo-American political and educational cultures, and their implications for the governance and mission of higher education, the role of critical scholarship, and the state and standing of the humanities in China. The book concludes with a focus on the "Idea of a University"; the values underpinning its mission, shape, and purpose, reflecting on the implications of China's rapid higher education development for the geo-politics of higher education itself.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 3,91 MB
978-0-19-259450-1 (9780192594501)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Marijk van der Wende is Distinguished Faculty Professor of Higher Education, Faculty of Law, Economics and Governance, Utrecht University. William C. Kirby is Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies at Harvard University. Nian Cai Liu is the Director of the Center for World-Class Universities and the Dean of the Graduate School of Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Simon Marginson is Professor of Higher Education at the University of Oxford and Director of the ESRC/OFSRE Centre for Global Higher Education (CGHE).
  • Cover
  • China and Europe on the New Silk Road: Connecting Universities Across Eurasia
  • Copyright
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: China's Rise and the New Silk Road in Global Context
  • 1.1 Conceptual Framework
  • 1.2 The NSR in Global Context: China's Rise and the Shifts in Flows and Impact
  • 1.3 Global Impact and Rising Tensions
  • 1.4 The NSR and the Evolving China-European Relationship
  • 1.5 The NSR and the Idea of a University
  • References
  • Chapter 2: The International Origins and Global Aspirations of Chinese Universities: Along the New Silk Road?
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 History and Memory of the International Origins of Chinese Universities
  • 2.3 Global Strategies of Chinese Universities
  • 2.4 The Silk (or Other) Roads for Cooperation between China and Europe?
  • References
  • Chapter 3: EU-China Cooperation along the New Silk Road: A Balanced Approach Towards Common Goals?
  • 3.1 Introduction: the EU-China Cooperation in Higher Education and R&D
  • 3.2 The EU's Legal Competencies in Higher Education and Research
  • 3.3 A Short History of EU-China Relations in Research
  • 3.4 A Short History of EU-China Relations in Higher Education
  • 3.5 Policy Mechanisms and Instruments
  • 3.6 Effects
  • 3.7 Goals and Rationales
  • 3.8 Conclusions and Discussion
  • The Evolving EU-China Relationship: More Complex Than Simply From Aid to Trade
  • Patterns, Paradoxes, and Dilemmas
  • Persistent Imbalances and Strong STEM Bias
  • References
  • Chapter 4: First Effects of the New Silk Road Initiative on Research Collaboration: Macro-level Evidence from Europe
  • 4.1 Chinese International Collaboration in Science and the New Silk Road
  • 4.2 Build-up of Chinese-European Science Partnerships
  • 4.3 Analytics and Empirical Information Gathering
  • 4.4 Chinese Science has Become a Major Force, but NSR Impacts Remain Obscure
  • 4.5 Minor NSR Influences on European Science?
  • 4.6 Detecting NSR Effects Requires a Sophisticated Toolkit . . . and Patience
  • Appendix 1: List of selected Chineseuniversities for data analysis(Alphabetically ordered
  • names as applied in the CWTS/Web of Science
  • References
  • Chapter 5:A Quiet Success: The EU-China Higher Education Cooperation Program (1997-2001)
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 The EU-China Higher Education Cooperation Program and its Outputs
  • Improving the Conditions Under Which the Existing Corpus of Chinese Specialists Work on Europe
  • Promoting Chinese Scholars' Greater Interest and Understanding of the European Union
  • Institutional Capacity Building
  • Training in Governance Issues and Applied Human Science
  • 5.3 The EU-China Higher Education Cooperation Program in Historical Context
  • 5.4 A Comparison of Two Projects: The EU-China Higher Education Cooperation Program and the China Europe International Business School
  • 5.5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6: International University Consortia on the New Silk Road: Zhuolin Feng and Luyang Gao
  • 6.1 Literature Review
  • Definition of International University Consortia
  • Drivers of Building International University Consortia
  • International University Consortia along the Road
  • 6.2 Method
  • Research Design
  • Data Collection
  • Limitation
  • 6.3 Findings
  • The Map of the University Consortia along the Road
  • Road Countries on this Map (50 percent)
  • EU Countries on this Map (18 percent)
  • World-Class Universities on this Map (20 percent)
  • The Development of These Consortia Along the Road
  • Three Phases of Their Development
  • The Change of Member Countries
  • The Change of WCU Members
  • The Essence of These University Consortia
  • Founding of These Consortia
  • Types of These Consortia
  • Goals of the Consortia
  • 6.4 Discussion
  • Three Phases
  • Member Universities from the EU, China, and the US
  • The Role of World-Class Universities
  • References
  • Chapter 7: East Meets West in Suzhou at the Dushu Lake Higher Education Town
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Suzhou Industrial Park and Dushu Lake
  • 7.3 Internationalization and XJTLU
  • 7.4 Development of XJTLU
  • 7.5 Personal Experience at IBSS
  • 7.6 Demographic Challenges
  • 7.7 Organizational Challenges
  • Mutual Dependencies
  • Human Resources
  • Correct Incentives
  • 7.8 Cooperation Challenges
  • 7.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Silk Road South: China-Malaysia Collaboration in Higher Education
  • 8.1 China's Rise, Europe's Response
  • Students
  • Staff
  • Eastern Europe
  • Western Europe
  • Sino-Danish Collaboration
  • Signs of Change
  • Silk Road South: the Six Pillars of Relations
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Repositioning China in the Global Education Hierarchy Through the Sino-Foreign Educational Partnerships in the Belt and Road Initiative
  • 9.1 Introduction: the BRI and its RedefinedUtilization of SFEP
  • 9.2 Phase 1: The "Bringing-in" of Foreign Educational Resources into China's HE system
  • 9.3 Phase 2: The "Moving-up" of the SFEP within the HE System
  • 9.4 Phase 3: The "Going-out" of the SFEP within the BRI Framework
  • 9.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: One Belt One Road: An Opportunity for Chinese Engineering Education to Go Global?
  • 10.1 Background
  • 10.2 OBOR Initiative Calls for a Growing Number of Engineering Talents
  • 10.3 The Growth of Chinese Higher Education inEngineering: Five Trends
  • Increased Scale
  • Remarkable Rise in Ranking
  • Strong National Policy Support
  • Proactive Internationalization
  • Growing Efforts in Engineering Educational Innovations
  • Outcome-based Engineering Education
  • Project-based Learning (PBL) with a Focus on Design
  • Extracurricular Practice-based Activities
  • International Learning Experiences
  • Industry-University Cooperation (IUC)
  • One Drawback: Lack of Empirical Engineering Education Research
  • 10.4 Attractiveness of Chinese Education to International Students
  • 10.5 Rise of Joint-degree and Other English Programs in Engineering in China
  • 10.6 Learning Outcomes of International Engineering Students in China
  • 10.7 Opportunities and Challenges for International Engineering Students
  • 10.8 Overseas Branches for Chinese Universities
  • 10.9 Discussion
  • 10.10 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: A Silk Road for Professional Qualifications?: EU Models of Integration and their Potential in Sino-EU Relations
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Harmonization
  • 11.3 Harmonization as a Basis for EU-China Cooperation
  • 11.4 Mutual Recognition and Mutual Trust
  • 11.5 Mutual Recognition as a Basis for EU-China Cooperation?
  • 11.6 Public-Private Arrangements for Diploma Recognition
  • 11.7 Public-Private Arrangements as a Basis for EU-China Cooperation?
  • 11.8 Model of Procedural Cooperation
  • 11.9 Potential for Shaping EU-China Relations
  • 11.10 Model Based on the EU Lawyers' Directive
  • 11.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: A European Compass for Transporting Personal Data on the New Silk Road
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 The Protection of Personal Data in theEuropean Union
  • 12.3 Transferring Personal Data to a Third Country Under the GDPR
  • 12.3.1 General Principles for the Processing of Personal Data
  • 12.3.2 Specfic Requirements for Third Country Data Transfers
  • 12.4 Protecting Personal Data in China: a Brief Comparative Glance Through the Lens of the GDPR
  • 12.5 Legal Arrangements for Navigating the New Silk Road
  • 12.6 Technological Solutions for Navigating the New Silk Road
  • 12.7 Conclusion: Dead Ends on the New Silk Road?
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Artificial Intelligence along the New Silk Road: Competition or Collaboration?
  • 13.1 Chinese AI and Computer Science Research becomes Internationally Competitive
  • 13.2 The AI Boom
  • 13.3 China Develops its AI Strategy
  • 13.4 What Do the Numbers Say?
  • 13.5 Where Do We Go From Here?
  • 13.6 Working With AI Colleagues From China
  • 13.7 European Academic Institutions Accepting AI Research Funding From Chinese Companies
  • 13.8 Transferability of AI and Computer Science Results
  • 13.9 Competition
  • The Global AI Talent Pool
  • The American Dream?
  • 13.10 Collaboration
  • 13.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14: China Meets Anglo-America on the New Silk Road: A Comparison of State, Society, Self, and Higher Education
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • China Going Out
  • Comparing Two Cultures
  • Methods and Limits
  • 14.2 Contrasting Spheres of Social Action
  • The Western Imaginary: Divided Powers
  • The Sinic Imaginary: the Embedded Social
  • 14.3 The State and Higher Education
  • The Sinic State
  • Higher Education and the State: Similarities and Differences
  • 14.4 Self and Society in Higher Education
  • Anglo-American Individualism in Higher Education
  • Individual, Family and Collective in Sinic Higher Education
  • 14.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Speaking Truth to Power Kantian and Confucian Perspectives on the Role of the Scholar
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Confucian Views on the Role of the Scholar
  • 15.3 Kantian Views on the Role of the Scholar
  • 15.4 Implications for Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century
  • 15.5 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 16: The Humanities and the New Silk Road
  • 16.1 Initiatives and Projects
  • 16.2 Projects Related to the New Silk Road
  • 16.3 Efforts to Strengthen the Global Role of the Chinese Humanities
  • 16.4 Other Relevant Developments in the Chinese Humanities
  • 16.5 China's Place in the Global Humanities
  • 16.6 The Context: China's Significance in Other Professional Worlds
  • 16.7 The International Humanities and China
  • Another World? The Nature of the Chinese Humanities
  • The Global Influence of the Chinese Humanities
  • 16.8 Future Potentials
  • Reference list
  • Chapter 17: The Role of World-Class and Other Research Universities in Contributing to the New Silk Road Initiative
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Review of Literature
  • The Evolution of Research Universities' Functions Within the Changing Context
  • Research Universities' Roles in the New Silk Road
  • 17.3 Research Design
  • Data Collection
  • Documentary Method
  • Semi-structured Interviews
  • Data Analysis
  • 17.4 Results and Findings
  • Case 1: S University (a WCU in China)
  • Case 2: Z University (a RU in China)
  • Case 3: N University (a WCU in the Netherlands)
  • Case 4: P University (a RU in Portugal)
  • 17.5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Research Universities' Roles in Contributing to the NSR Initiative
  • A Comparison of Research Universities' Functions in Contributing to the NSR Initiative
  • References
  • Chapter 18: The New Silk Road and the "Idea of the University"
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Theoretical Background
  • The Idea of the University and its Social Contract
  • Values Inherent in Colleges and Universities
  • 18.3 The Influence of Western Models on the Development of Chinese Higher Education
  • 18.4 Shifting Missions and Emerging University Models: a Lively Debate on China
  • 18.5 The New Silk Road Initiative and Higher Education
  • China European International Business School (CEIBS)
  • Implementing BRI
  • Governance and Institutional Autonomy
  • Values
  • Social Contract
  • Synthesis
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University: Antai College of Economics and Management (ACEM)
  • Implementing BRI
  • Governance and Institutional Autonomy
  • Values
  • Social Contract
  • Synthesis
  • Beijing Foreign Studies University's Silk Road Research Institute
  • Implementing the BRI
  • Governance and Institutional Autonomy
  • Values
  • Social Contract
  • Synthesis
  • Renmin University's New Silk Road School at Suzhou
  • Implementing the BRI
  • Governance and Institutional Autonomy
  • Values
  • Social Contract
  • Synthesis
  • 18.6 Key Findings
  • 18.7 Conclusions and Discussion
  • Appendix 1
  • References
  • Chapter 19: What are the Objectives of Chinese Higher Education in Relation to the New Silk Road Initiative?
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Changes in China's Higher Education
  • 19.3 Key Features of China's Higher Education
  • Missions and Functions of Higher Education
  • Relationship Between Government and HEIs
  • Recent Constraints on Higher Education Institutions
  • Emphasizing Practical and Utilitarian Aspects
  • International Comparisons
  • 19.4 The NSR and China's Higher Education
  • Policies
  • The NSR and Higher Education
  • Findings from Previous Studies
  • NSR Policies in Higher Education
  • Progress and Practical Effects
  • 19.5 Issues and Challenges
  • 19.6 Summary and Implications
  • Implications
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Russia, China, and Central Asia in Higher Education
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Russia and China
  • Soviet Contribution to Higher Education in China
  • Similarities and Differences in the Transformation of Soviet-shaped Higher Education
  • Current Cooperation Between Russia and China in Higher Education
  • Flows of Influence Between the Two Higher Education Systems
  • Limitations to Cooperation
  • 20.3 Central Asia and China
  • Central Asia, Russia, and Higher Education
  • China in Central Asia
  • The New Silk Road and Higher Education
  • 20.4 Conclusions: Central Asia, Russia, and China
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

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