Community-Based Participatory Research for Health

Advancing Social and Health Equity
 
 
Jossey-Bass (Verlag)
  • 3. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 5. Oktober 2017
  • |
  • 480 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-25887-2 (ISBN)
 
The definitive guide to CBPR concepts and practice, updated and expanded
Community-Based Participatory Research for Health: Advancing Health and Social Equity provides a comprehensive reference for this rapidly growing field in participatory and community-engaged research. Hailed as effective by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CBPR and CEnR represent the link between researchers and community and lead to improved public health outcomes.
This book provides practitioner-focused guidance on CBPR and CEnR to help public health professionals, students, and practitioners from multiple other clinical, planning, education, social work, and social science fields to successfully work towards social and health equity.
With a majority of new chapters, the book provides a thorough overview of CBPR history, theories of action and participatory research, emerging trends of knowledge democracy, and promising practices. Drawn from a ten-year research effort, this new material is organized around the CBPR Conceptual Model, illustrating the importance of social context, promising partnering practices, and the added value of community and other stakeholder engagement for intervention development and research design. Partnership evaluation, measures, and outcomes are highlighted, with a revised section on policy outcomes, including global health case studies.
For the first time, this updated edition also includes access to the companion website, featuring lecture slides of conceptual and partnership evaluation-focused chapters, with resources from appendices to help bring CBPR concepts and practices directly into the classroom.
Proven effective year after year, CBPR has become a critically important framework for public health, and this book provides clear reference for all aspects of the practice. Readers will:
* Examine the latest research on CPBR, and incorporate new insights into practice
* Understand the history and theoretical basis of CPBR, and why it has been so effective
* Reflect on critical issues of racism, power, and privilege; trust development; ethical practice within and beyond IRBs; and cultural humility
* Learn new partnership evaluation and collective reflection strategies, including measures and metrics, to enhance their own practice for improved health and social equity outcomes
3. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons
  • 6,71 MB
978-1-119-25887-2 (9781119258872)
1119258871 (1119258871)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Nina Wallerstein, DrPH, MPH, is a professor of public health in the College of Population Health and the Director of the Center for Participatory Research at the University of New Mexico.
Bonnie Duran, DrPH, is a Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington, and is also Director of the Center for Indigenous Health Research at the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute.
John G. Oetzel, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Management Communication in the Waikato Management School at the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand.
Meredith Minkler, DrPH, is Professor Emerita of Health and Social Behavior in the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.
  • TITLE PAGE
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • THE EDITORS
  • THE CONTRIBUTORS
  • PREFACE
  • REFERENCE
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • PART 1: INTRODUCTION: HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES
  • CHAPTER 1: ON COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH
  • NEW AND CONTINUING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  • AGENDA FOR THE NEW EDITION
  • CORE PRINCIPLES OF CBPR WITHIN A CONTINUUM OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
  • EFFECTIVENESS OF CBPR AND COMMUNITY-ENGAGED RESEARCH
  • ORGANIZATION OF THIS BOOK
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • NOTE
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 2: THEORETICAL, HISTORICAL, AND PRACTICE ROOTS OF CBPR
  • TWO HISTORICAL TRADITIONS
  • PARTICIPATION
  • KNOWLEDGE DEMOCRACY
  • POWER RELATIONS
  • FEMINISM, POST-STRUCTURALISM, AND POSTCOLONIALISM
  • PAULO FREIRE AND PRAXIS
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • NOTE
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 3: CRITICAL ISSUES IN DEVELOPING AND FOLLOWING CBPR PRINCIPLES
  • CBPR DEFINITION AND KEY PRINCIPLES
  • ISSUES IN DEVELOPING AND FOLLOWING CBPR PRINCIPLES
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • NOTES
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 2: POWER, TRUST, AND DIALOGUE: WORKING WITH DIVERSE COMMUNITIES
  • CHAPTER 4: UNDERSTANDING CONTEMPORARY RACISM, POWER, AND PRIVILEGE AND THEIR IMPACTS ON CBPR
  • CBPR AND THE EXPLORATION OF RACISM
  • UNDERSTANDING RACISM AND ANTIRACISM FRAMEWORKS
  • BEYOND (AND WITHIN) RACISM: POWER AND PRIVILEGE IN CBPR
  • CBPR STRATEGIES TO COMBAT RACISM
  • CBPR CASE STUDIES: PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
  • DISRUPTING THE POTENTIAL FOR REINSCRIPTION OF RACISM IN CBPR
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 5: TRUST DEVELOPMENT IN CBPR PARTNERSHIPS
  • STUDY BACKGROUND
  • TRUST TYPOLOGY: SUPPORT FOR A DEVELOPMENTAL FRAMEWORK
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 3: CBPR CONCEPTUAL MODEL: CONTEXT AND PROMISING RELATIONSHIP PRACTICES
  • CHAPTER 6: SOCIO-ECOLOGIC FRAMEWORK FOR CBPR: DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A MODEL
  • STAGE ONE: CREATING THE MODEL
  • STAGE TWO: RESEARCH FOR IMPROVED HEALTH: TESTING AND STRENGTHENING THE MODEL
  • STAGE THREE: CONTINUING TO ADAPT AND EXPAND THE MODEL: DISCOVERING NEW USES
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • NOTES
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 7: YOUTH-LED PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH (YPAR): PRINCIPLES APPLIED TO THE US AND DIVERSE GLOBAL SETTINGS
  • KEY YPAR PRINCIPLES
  • YPAR PHASES AND SUPPORT RESOURCES
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 8: PARTNERSHIP, TRANSPARENCY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY: CHANGING SYSTEMS TO ENHANCE RACIAL EQUITY IN CANCER CARE AND OUTCOMES
  • HISTORY OF THE INTERSECTION OF CBPR AND ANTIRACISM TRAINING IN GREENSBORO
  • ENGAGING CANCER CENTERS AS EQUAL PARTNERS IN SYSTEM CHANGE RESEARCH FOR HEALTH EQUITY
  • THE SYSTEM CHANGE STUDY: ACCOUNTABILITY FOR CANCER CARE THROUGH UNDOING RACISM AND EQUITY (ACCURE)
  • RESULTS AND LESSONS LEARNED
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 9: SOUTH VALLEY PARTNERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: A STORY OF ALIGNMENT AND MISALIGNMENT
  • ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN THE UNITED STATES
  • SOCIOCULTURAL RELATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM IN THE SOUTH VALLEY
  • METHODS
  • DISCUSSION: TENSIONS AND FRACTURES
  • LESSONS LEARNED
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 4: PROMISING PRACTICES: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH DESIGN
  • CHAPTER 10: CBPR IN HEALTH CARE SETTINGS
  • USING CBPR PRINCIPLES TO ADVANCE HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
  • IMPLEMENTING CBPR IN HEALTH CARE SETTINGS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  • SHARED ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND DISSEMINATION OF RESULTS
  • VIGNETTES
  • CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 11: NATIONAL CENTER FOR DEAF HEALTH RESEARCH: CBPR WITH DEAF COMMUNITIES
  • INTRODUCTION TO DEAF COMMUNITIES
  • CBPR FOR HEALTH WITH ROCHESTER DEAF COMMUNITIES
  • CBPR, INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT, AND RESEARCH DESIGN
  • RPRC/NCDHR CAPACITY BUILDING
  • CULTURE-CENTEREDNESS APPROACH
  • LESSONS LEARNED
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 12: CBPR IN ASIAN AMERICAN COMMUNITIES
  • CBPR'S RELEVANCE FOR AA COMMUNITIES
  • CBPR CASE STUDIES
  • CONCLUSION: OPPORTUNITIES AND FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR CONDUCTING CBPR IN ASIAN COMMUNITIES
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 13: ENGAGED FOR CHANGE: AN INNOVATIVE CBPR STRATEGY TO INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT
  • OUR CBPR PARTNERSHIP'S EXPERIENCE WITH INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT
  • STEPS IN INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT THROUGH CBPR
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 5: PROMISING PRACTICES: ETHICAL ISSUES
  • CHAPTER 14: CBPR PRINCIPLES AND RESEARCH ETHICS IN INDIAN COUNTRY
  • INCORPORATING CULTURAL ELEMENTS THROUGH CBPR PRINCIPLES
  • ENSURING ETHICS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CBPR PRINCIPLES
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 15: DEMOCRATIZING ETHICAL OVERSIGHT OF RESEARCH THROUGH CBPR
  • OVERSIGHT OF PROTECTION OF STUDY PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH
  • UNCERTAINTY OF STUDY RESULTS AND PARTICIPANTS' RIGHT TO KNOW
  • IRB CHALLENGES RELATED TO INDIGENOUS RESEARCH
  • DEMOCRATIZING ETHICAL OVERSIGHT OF RESEARCH
  • WORKING WITH COMMUNITY AND TRIBAL IRBS
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 16: EVERYDAY CHALLENGES IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF CBPR: BROADENING OUR BANDWIDTH ON ETHICS
  • LAYING THE GROUNDWORK
  • GETTING â??PERMISSIONâ??: GOVERNANCE AS STEWARDSHIP AND HONORING COMMUNITY PROTOCOLS
  • PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION
  • SHARING YOUR WORK AND ENDING THE CYCLE
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 6: PROMISING PRACTICES TO OUTCOMES: CBPR CAPACITY AND HEALTH
  • CHAPTER 17: EVALUATION OF CBPR PARTNERSHIPS AND OUTCOMES: LESSONS AND TOOLS FROM THE RESEARCH FOR IMPROVED HEALTH STUDY
  • STUDY OF PARTNERSHIP SYNERGY
  • RIH STUDY METHODS
  • QUALITATIVE MEASURES AND TOOLS
  • KEY INFORMANT SURVEY
  • COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SURVEY
  • KEY OUTCOMES
  • MEASURES AND TOOLS FOR EVALUATION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 18: PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION AS A PROCESS OF EMPOWERMENT: EXPERIENCES WITH COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND LATIN AMERICA
  • WHAT IS EVALUATION?
  • WHAT IS PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION?
  • TRANSFORMATIVE PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION
  • DECOLONIZING PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION
  • A PROCESS FOR CARRYING OUT TRANSFORMATIVE PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION
  • CASE STUDY ONE: THE OREGON COMMUNITY EDUCATION WORKER (CEW) PROGRAM
  • CASE STUDY TWO: AMOS HEALTH AND HOPE, NICARAGUA
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 19: ACADEMIC POSITIONS FOR FACULTY OF COLOR: COMBINING LIFE CALLING, COMMUNITY SERVICE, AND RESEARCH
  • THE NATIVE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTERS FOR HEALTH (NARCH)
  • W.K. KELLOGG COMMUNITY HEALTH SCHOLARS (CHSP) AND KELLOGG HEALTH SCHOLARS PROGRAMS (KHSP)
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • PART 7: PROMISING PRACTICES TO OUTCOMES: HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY
  • CHAPTER 20: COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH FOR HEALTH EQUITY POLICY MAKING
  • THE SOCIAL ECOLOGY OF RESEARCH USE
  • THE LINK BETWEEN CBPR AND POLICY MAKING
  • TAKING ACTION TO ADVANCE HEALTH EQUITY: CBPR POLICY PRINCIPLES, GOALS, STRATEGIES, TARGETS, AND TOOLS
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 21: IMPROVING FOOD SECURITY AND TOBACCO CONTROL THROUGH POLICY-FOCUSED CBPR: A CASE STUDY OF HEALTHY RETAIL IN SAN FRANCISCO
  • OVERVIEW OF THE TENDERLOIN AND ITS HEALTHY CORNER STORE COALITION
  • CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
  • ROLE OF THE COALITION IN LINKING CBPR AND POLICY MAKING
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 22: CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM THROUGH PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH
  • MASS INCARCERATION AND THE PUBLIC'S HEALTH
  • MOVING TOWARD A BROADER PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH
  • THE SAFE RETURN PROJECT
  • THE MORRIS JUSTICE PROJECT
  • CONCLUSION
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • CHAPTER 23: GLOBAL HEALTH POLICY: SLUM SETTLEMENT MAPPING IN NAIROBI AND RIO DE JANEIRO
  • PLACE AND MAPPING IN A RELATIONAL VIEW
  • RIO DE JANEIRO CASE STUDY
  • CASE TWO: NAIROBI, KENYA: SHACK/SLUM DWELLERS INTERNATIONAL (SDI) IN THE MATHARE VALLEY
  • ONGOING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  • CONCLUSION: COMMUNITY MAPPING FOR HEALTH EQUITY
  • QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION
  • NOTES
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 1: CHALLENGING OURSELVES: CRITICAL SELF-REFLECTION ON POWER AND PRIVILEGE
  • ONE APPROACH TO CRITICAL SELF-REFLECTION
  • CONNECTING TO COMMUNITY PRACTICE
  • SUMMARY
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 2: GUIDING CBPR PRINCIPLES: FOSTERING EQUITABLE HEALTH CARE FOR LGBTQ+ PEOPLE
  • DEVELOPING LGBTQ+ GUIDELINES
  • QUICK TIPS FOR FOSTERING EQUITABLE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS WITH LGBTQ+ COMMUNITIES
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • NOTES
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 3: QUALITY CRITERIA OF THE INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION FOR PARTICIPATORY HEALTH RESEARCH (ICPHR)
  • ENSURING QUALITY: INDICATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PARTICIPATORY (HEALTH) RESEARCH
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 4: CULTURAL HUMILITY: REFLECTIONS AND RELEVANCE FOR CBPR
  • TEACHING CBPR WITH CULTURAL HUMILITY
  • CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 5: FUNDING IN CBPR IN US GOVERNMENT AND PHILANTHROPY
  • GOVERNMENT
  • PHILANTHROPY
  • NOTE
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 6: REALIST EVALUATION AND REVIEW FOR COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH: WHAT WORKS, FOR WHOM, UNDER WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES, AND HOW?
  • WHAT IS REALIST METHODOLOGY AND WHY IS IT ADVANTAGEOUS?
  • EXEMPLIFYING REALIST METHODOLOGY WITH THE PRAM REVIEW
  • CHALLENGES TO USING THE REALIST APPROACH
  • CONCLUSION
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • NOTE
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 7: PARTNERSHIP RIVER OF LIFE: CREATING A HISTORICAL TIME LINE
  • PARTNERSHIP RIVER OF LIFE HISTORICAL TIME LINE EXERCISE
  • NOTE
  • APPENDIX 8: PURPOSING A COMMUNITY-GROUNDED RESEARCH ETHICS TRAINING INITIATIVE
  • CASE STUDY: ETHICAL TRAINING FOR HEALTH WITH INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 9: PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DEVELOPING DATA SHARING, OWNERSHIP, AND PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS
  • PURPOSE
  • AGREEMENT INTRODUCTION
  • DATA-RELATED CHALLENGES
  • PUBLICATION, WRITING, AND GENERAL DISSEMINATION
  • RESOLVING GRIEVANCES
  • TERMINATION
  • AGREEMENT PERIOD
  • OTHER SECTIONS TO CONSIDER
  • EXAMPLE AGREEMENTS
  • APPENDIX 10: INSTRUMENTS AND MEASURES FOR EVALUATING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND PARTNERSHIPS
  • NOTE
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 11: PARTICIPATORY MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF COMMUNITY HEALTH INITIATIVES USING THE COMMUNITY CHECK BOX EVALUATION SYSTEM
  • BACKGROUND AND TECHNICAL SUPPORTS FOR MONITORING AND EVALUATION
  • PROTOCOL FOR PARTICIPATORY MONITORING AND EVALUATION
  • PARTICIPATORY SENSEMAKING AND ADJUSTMENTS
  • CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 12: POWER MAPPING: A USEFUL TOOL FOR UNDERSTANDING THE POLICY ENVIRONMENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO A LOCAL SODA TAX INITIATIVE
  • MAKING AND USING A POWER MAP
  • ILLUSTRATION OF POLICY MAPPING REGARDING A LOCAL SODA TAX INITIATIVE
  • MOVING TO VICTORY THE SECOND TIME AROUND
  • CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX 13: CBPR INTERACTIVE ROLE-PLAYS: THREE SCENARIOS
  • SAMPLE MODULE 1: CONDUCTING CBPR RESEARCH ON INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN A HIGH SCHOOL WITH A SIGNIFICANT NEW IMMIGRANT POPULATION
  • AFTERWORD
  • REFERENCES
  • INDEX

THE CONTRIBUTORS


MARGARITA ALEGRÍA, PhD, is the chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor in the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Alegría has served as PI on more than fifteen federally funded research grants and has published more than two hundred professional publications on topics such as the improvement of health care services delivery for diverse racial and ethnic populations, conceptual and methodological issues with multicultural populations, and ways to bring the community's perspective into the design and implementation of health services.

ALEX J. ALLEN, III, MSA, is the president and CEO of the Chandler Park Conservancy. He collaborates with residents, stakeholders, local institutions, business, government, and the philanthropic community to transform Chandler Park into a campus with exceptional educational, recreational, and conservation opportunities for youth and families on Detroit's eastside and the region. He has effectively led organizations, collaborative initiatives, and has improved the quality of life for people who live, work, play, and visit communities in the United States. His experience includes managing grants for compliance and budget integrity, convening stakeholders for planning and project implementation, supervising and monitoring youth programs, fund-raising, reporting and evaluation, and CBPR.

JORGE ALONZO, JD, is a research associate at Wake Forest School of Medicine and is part of a team that specializes in HIV-prevention research using CBPR with immigrant Latinos. He has been involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of HIV-prevention interventions for Latino gay and bisexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM) and Latina transgender women. He has also been involved in projects exploring the impact of immigration enforcement on access to and use of public health services among Latinos.

ANDREA AULT, PhD, MPA, is the senior director of the Mental Health Innovation Lab in the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. She was previously the associate director of the Health Equity Lab at Cambridge Health Alliance, where her research focused on racial-ethnic disparities in mental health care, dissemination and implementation research, and CBPR.

MAGDALENA AVILA, DrPH, MPH, MSW, is associate professor, community health education, Department of Health, Exercise and Sports Science, College of Education, University of New Mexico. She self-identifies as an activist scholar in community health and CBPR, in her partnering with Latino and other Indigenous communities of color, and in her use of a social justice framework. Her areas of research are environmental health, environmental racism, and community health impact assessments in working with rural and urban communities, and she has expanded her research capacity by incorporating digital story making into her CBPR work with Latino communities.

STEPHANIE BAKER, PhD, MS, PT, is assistant professor of public health at Elon University and a member of the Greensboro Health Disparities Collaborative. Her work is focused on social determinants of racial inequities in health, community organizing as a tool for public health change, antiracism pedagogy, and CBPR.

BARBARA BAQUERO, PhD, MPH, is assistant professor of community and behavioral health at the University of Iowa, College of Public Health. She is a founding member of the Healthy Equity Advancement Lab (HEAL), an academic-community research lab dedicated to advancing health equity through research and training. She serves as PI and deputy director of the University of Iowa, Prevention Research Center, funded by the CDC.

STEVEN BARNETT, MD, is associate professor of family medicine and public health sciences at the University of Rochester and director of the Rochester Prevention Research Center: National Center for Deaf Health Research. He is a sign language-skilled family physician researcher with a career focus on health care and collaborative health research with deaf sign language users and people with hearing loss, their families, and communities.

ADAM B. BECKER, PhD, MPH, is associate professor of pediatrics and preventive medicine in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. He is also executive director of the Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children (CLOCC) at Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. He has used CBPR to examine and address the impact of stressful community conditions on the health of women raising children, youth violence prevention, and the impact of the social and physical environment on physical activity.

LORENDA BELONE, PhD, MPH, (Diné/Navajo) is assistant professor at the University of New Mexico (UNM) College of Education. She is a senior fellow with the Center for Participatory Research, a center that supports networks of research with community partners in New Mexico addressing health inequities, and a senior fellow with the UNM Center for Health Policy. Since 2000, she has been actively engaged in CBPR research that has involved southwest Native American communities. She currently is co-PI on a NIDA-funded RIO multi-tribal implementation and evaluation study (1R01DA037174-03).

EVAN BISSELL, MPH, MCP, is an artist based in the Bay Area. He teaches art and social change at UC Berkeley and is involved in participatory research and art projects in multiple settings across the country that support equitable systems and liberatory processes. His work has been exhibited in institutions and galleries across the country. He is the creator of knottedline.com and freedoms-ring.org.

KRISTIN BLACK, PhD, MPH, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Cancer Health Disparities Training Program in the Department of Health Behavior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her PhD is in maternal and child health, and her career commitment is to use CBPR approaches to understand and address race-specific inequities in cancer survivorship and reproductive health.

JULIA GREEN BRODY, PhD, is executive director and senior scientist at Silent Spring Institute, an independent research group founded in 1994 by breast cancer activists to create a "lab of their own" focused on environmental factors and prevention. Her research, supported by the National Institutes of Health, investigates everyday exposures to carcinogens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals from consumer products, workplaces, and pollution.

PHIL BROWN, PhD, is University Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Health Sciences at Northeastern, where he directs the Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute. His books include No Safe Place: Toxic Waste, Leukemia, and Community Action; Toxic Exposures: Contested Illnesses and the Environmental Health Movement; and Contested Illnesses: Citizens, Science, and Health Social Movements. He directs an NIEHS training program "Transdisciplinary Training at the Intersection of Environmental Health and Social Science."

LISA CACARI-STONE, PhD, MA, MS, is associate professor in the College of Population Health and assistant director with the RWJF Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. Her scholarly interests focus on upstream determinants of health, including societal and political structures and relationships that differentially affect population health and policy interventions that influence health equity. Her community-engaged research with Latino and US-Mexico border communities encompass macro-level determinants (e.g., immigration policy, health reform); the community level (e.g., impact of neighborhood context and migration on substance use); and the interpersonal level (e.g., the role of promotores de salud in chronic disease management among Latinos). Cacari Stone is widely trusted for her work in translating and disseminating data for policy making with governments, community-based organizations, coalitions, and foundations.

CHARLOTTE YU-TING CHANG, DrPH, MPH, is coordinator of research to practice and evaluation and associate project scientist at the Labor Occupational Health Program, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. Her work has focused on advancing the movement of research into practice in worker health and safety, with a particular interest in the role and processes of research partnerships with workers and community members. She has worked and written on a range of projects involving immigrant worker populations and communities as well as on research to practice lessons learned in construction health and safety.

VIVIAN CHÁVEZ, DrPH, is associate professor of health education at San Francisco State University. A storyteller by nature, she has collaborated with community-based organizations to disseminate their work. She coedited Prevention Is Primary: Strategies in Community Well-Being, coauthored Drop That Knowledge: Youth Radio Stories, translated Media Advocacy into Spanish, and made a film about cultural humility that is widely accessible. Her work integrates the language of the arts, culture, and the body for health and social change.

BOWEN CHUNG, MD, MSHS, is associate professor-in-residence of psychiatry at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, an adjunct scientist at the RAND Corporation, and an attending physician at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. He has been a PI and co-PI on ten federally funded research grants and is the author of more than thirty scientific publications. He has been working with the same community partners for nearly fifteen years.

VICKI COLLIE-AKERS, PhD, MPH, is associate director of health promotion research...

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