History and Topography of Ireland

 
 
Digireads.com Publishing
  • erschienen am 1. Februar 2013
  • |
  • 208 Seiten
 
E-Book
978-1-4209-4786-1 (ISBN)
 
Gerald of Wales, or Giraldus Cambrensis, was a medieval clergyman and historian who served as the royal clerk and chaplain to King Henry II of England. Gerald of Wales was afforded the opportunity in 1185 to accompany the King's son John on his first expedition to Ireland. Because of those travels he would write his first of many works by penning the "Topographia Hibernica" or the "Topography of Ireland". The work is an account of the landscape and people of Ireland and was one the longest and most influential works on the country during the Middle Ages. Shortly after writing this work he would compose his "Expugnatio Hibernica" or the "Conquest of Ireland" in which he accounts King Henry's conquest of the country. For those interested in Irish History the "Topology" and the "Conquest", both contained in this volume, give an interesting perspective from one of the foremost medieval historians.
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Neeland Media LLC
978-1-4209-4786-1 (9781420947861)
1420947869 (1420947869)
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  • Title page
  • PREFACE.
  • THE TOPOGRAPHY OF IRELAND.
  • THE AUTHOR'S FIRST PREFACE.
  • THE AUTHOR'S SECOND PREFACE.
  • DISTINCTION I.
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE SITUATION OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER II. OF THE SPANISH SEA, WHICH EMBRACES BRITAIN AND IRELAND WITH ITS TWO ARMS.
  • CHAPTER III. OF THE VARIOUS OPINIONS OF SOLINUS, OROSIUS, ISIDORE, AND BEDE
  • SOME TRUE, SOME ERRONEOUS.
  • CHAPTER IV. OF THE SURFACE OF IRELAND, AND ITS INEQUALITIES
  • AND OF THE FERTILITY OF THE SOIL.
  • CHAPTER V. ON THE PREVALENCE OF WINDS AND RAIN
  • AND THEIR CAUSES.
  • CHAPTER VI. OF THE NINE PRINCIPAL RIVERS, AND SEVERAL OTHERS WHICH HAVE BURST FORTH OF LATE.
  • CHAPTER VII. OF THE LAKES, AND THE ISLANDS THEREIN
  • OF THE FISHES IN THE SEA, RITERS, AND LAKES
  • AND OF THOSE WHICH ARE NOT FOUND THERE
  • AND OF SOME NEW SPECIES OF FISH NOT FOUND ELSEWHERE.
  • CHAPTER VIII. OF BIRDS, AND THOSE THAT ARE WANTING, WITH THEIR NATURES AND ALLEGORICAL SIGNIFICATIONS
  • OF THE HAWK, THE FALCON, AND THE SPARROW-HAWK, AND THEIR NATURES.
  • CHAPTER IX. OF THE EAGLE, AND ITS NATURE.
  • CHAPTER X. OF THE CRANE, AND ITS NATURE.
  • CHAPTER XI. OF BARNACLES, WHICH GROW FROM FIR TIMBER, AND THEIR NATURE.
  • CHAPTER XII. OF BIRDS OF TWOFOLD SPECIES AND MIXED BREED.
  • CHAPTER XIII. OF MARTINETS AND THEIR NATURES.
  • CHAPTER XIV. OF SWANS AND STORKS AND THEIR NATURES.
  • CHAPTER XV. OF BIRDS WHICH DISAPPEAR DURING THE WINTER.
  • CHAPTER XVI. OF GRASSHOPPERS WHICH SING THE BETTER WHEN THEIR HEADS ARE CUT OFF, AND REVIVE SPONTANEOUSLY AFTER BEING LONG DEAD.
  • CHAPTER XVII. OF THE VARIOUS KINDS OF CROWS FOUND HERE, AND OF THEIR NATURES.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. OF THE CROERIAE WHICH ARE HERE WHITE, AND OF OTHER SPECIES OF BIRDS.
  • CHAPTER XIX. OF WILD ANIMALS, AND THEIR NATURES.
  • CHAPTER XX. OF THE BADGES AND ITS NATURE.
  • CHAPTER XXI. OF THE BEAVER AND ITS NATURE.
  • CHAPTER XXII. OF WEASELS AND THEIR NATURE.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. OF REPTILES, AND THOSE WHICH ARE NOT FOUND IN THE ISLAND
  • AND THAT THERE ARE NO VENOMOUS CREATURES, FOR THOSE THAT ARE BROUGHT OVER IMMEDIATELY DIE, AND THEIR POISON LOSES ITS VENOM
  • AND OF THE DUST OF THIS LAND AND LEATHERN THONGS BEING ANTIDOTES FOR POISON.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. OF A FROG LATELY FOUND IN IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XXV. ON SEVERAL ADVANTAGES POSSESSED BY THE ISLAND
  • AND THE NATURE OF THE CLIMATE.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. A COMPARISON OF THE EAST AND WEST
  • AND THAT IN THE EAST ALL THE ELEMENTS ARE PESTIFEROUS, AND OF THE MALIGNITY OF POISONS THERE.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. OF THE SINGULARLY TEMPERATE CHARACTER OF OUR CLIMATE
  • AND THAT WE ARE HAPPILY FREE FROM MANY DISADVANTAGES.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. THAT THE EAST IS THE FOUNTAIN-HEAD OF POISONS, AND THAT THE ADVANTAGES IN THE WEST ARE PREFERABLE TO THOSE IN THE EAST.
  • DISTINCTION II. OF THE WONDERS AND MIRACLES OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE STRONG CURRENTS IN THE IRISH SEA, AND THE EBB AND FLOW OF THE TIDES THEREIN.
  • CHAPTER II. OF THE DIFFERENCE OF THE TIDES IN IRELAND AND BRITAIN.
  • CHAPTER III. OF THE INFLUENCE OF THE SEA ON THE WATERS, AS WELL AS ON NATURAL HUMOURS.
  • CHAPTER IV. OF TWO ISLANDS, IN ONE OF WHICH NO ONE DIES, AND IN THE OTHER, NO ANIMAL OF THE FEMALE SEX ENTERS.
  • CHAPTER V. OF AN ISLAND, ONE PART OF WHICH IS FREQUENTED BY GOOD SPIRITS, THE OTHER BY EVIL SPIRITS.
  • CHAPTER VI. OF AN ISLAND WHERE HUMAN CORPSES EXPOSED TO THE ATMOSPHERE DO NOT SUPPER DECAY.
  • CHAPTER VII. OF THE WONDERFUL NATURES OF SOME FOUNTAINS.
  • CHAPTER VIII. OF TWO EXTRAORDINARY FOUNTAINS, ONE IN BRITANY, THE OTHER IN SICILY.
  • CHAPTER IX. OF A GREAT LAKE WHICH ORIGINATED IN A REMARKABLE MANNER.
  • CHAPTER X. OF A FISH WHICH HAD THREE GOLDEN TEETH.
  • CHAPTER XI. OF THE NORTHERN ISLANDS, MOST OF WHICH ARE IN SUBJECTION TO THE NORWEGIANS.
  • CHAPTER XII. OF AN ISLAND WHICH AT FIRST FLOATED, AND AFTER-WARDS WAS FIRMLY FIXED BY MEANS OF FIRE.
  • CHAPTER XIII. OF ICELAND, WHICH IS INHABITED BY A PEOPLE OF FEW WORDS, WHO SPEAK THE TRUTH, AND NEVER TAKE AN OATH.
  • CHAPTER XIV. OF A WHIRLPOOL IN THE SEA WHICH SUCKS IN SHIPS.
  • CHAPTER XV. OF THE ISLE OF MAN, WHICH, ON ACCOUNT OF THE VENOMOUS REPTILES IT HARBOURS, IS CONSIDERED TO BELONG TO BRITAIN.
  • CHAPTER XVI. THAT ISLANDS WERE FORMED LONG AFTER THE FLOOD, NOT SUDDENLY, BUT BY DEGREES, FROM ALLUVIAL MATTER.
  • CHAPTER XVII. OF THULE, THE WESTERN ISLAND, VERY CELEBRATED AMONG THE ORIENTALS, THOUGH IT BE TOTALLY UNKNOWN TO THE PEOPLE OF THE WEST.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. OF THE GIANTS' DANCE, WHICH WAS TRANSFERRED FROM IRELAND TO BRITAIN.
  • CHAPTER XIX. OF THE PRODIGIES OF OUR TIMES, AND FIRST OF A WOLF WHICH CONVERSED WITH A PRIEST.
  • CHAPTER XX. OF A WOMAN WHO HAD A BEARD, AND A HAIRY CREST AND MANE ON HER BACK.
  • CHAPTER XXI. OF AN ANIMAL WHICH WAS HALF-OX, HALF-MAN.
  • CHAPTER XXII. OF AN ANIMAL ENGENDERED BY A STAG AND A COW.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. OF A GOAT WHICH HAD INTERCOURSE WITH A WOMAN.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. OF A LION THAT WAS ENAMOURED OF A WOMAN.
  • CHAPTER XXV. THAT COCKS IN IRELAND CROW AT DIFFERENT HOURS FROM THOSE IN OTHER COUNTRIES.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. OF WOLVES WHICH WHELPED IN THE MONTH OF DECEMBER.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. OF THE RAVENS AND OWLS WHICH ONCE HAD YOUNG ONES AT CHRISTMAS.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. OF MIRACLES
  • AND, FIRST, OF THE APPLES, AND RAVENS, AND BLACKBIRDS OF ST. KEIWIN.
  • CHAPTER XXIX. OF ST. COLMAN'S TEAL, WHICH WERE TAMED BY HIM, AND CANNOT BE INJURED.
  • CHAPTER XXX. OF THE STONE IN WHICH A CAVITY IS EVERY DAY MIRACULOUSLY FILLED WITH WINE.
  • CHAPTER XXXI. OF THE FLEAS WHICH WERE GOT BID OF BY ST. NANNAN.
  • CHAPTER XXXII. OF THE RATS WHICH WERE EXPELLED BY ST. YVORUS.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII. OF A WANDERING BELL.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV. OF VARIOUS MIRACLES IN KILDARE
  • AND FIRST, OF THE FIRE WHICH NEVER GOES OUT, AND THE ASHES WHICH NEVER INCREASE.
  • CHAPTER XXXV. NOW THE FIRE IS KEPT ALIVE BY ST. BRIGHT ON HER NIGHT.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI. OF THE HEDGE BOUND THE FIRE, WHICH NO MALE CAN ENTER.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII. OF THE FALCON IN KILDARE WHICH APPEASED TAME AND DOMESTICATED.
  • CHAPTER XXXVIII. OF A BOOK MIRACULOUSLY WRITTEN.
  • CHAPTER XXXIX. HOW THE BOOK WAS COMPOSED.
  • CHAPTER XL. OF THE PLACES OF REFUGE MIRACULOUSLY PROTECTED BY THE SAINTS.
  • CHAPTER XLI. OF THE SALMON-LEAP.
  • CHAPTER XLII. HOW THE SALMON LEAP.
  • CHAPTER XLIII. OF THE LIFE OF ST. BRENDAN.
  • CHAPTER XLIV. OR THE CROSS AT DUBLIN WHICH SPAKE AND BORE TESTIMONY TO THE TRUTH.
  • CHAPTER XLV. HOW THE SAME CROSS BECAME IMMOVEABLE.
  • CHAPTER XLVI. HOW A PENNY, OFFERED BEFORE THE CROSS, TWICE LEAPT BACK, BUT THE THIRD TIME, AFTER CONFESSION MADE, REMAINED, AND OF THE IRON GREAVES THAT WERE MIRACULOUSLY RESTORED.
  • CHAPTER XLVII. OF A PHRENETIC MAN AT FERNS, WHO PREDICTED FUTURE EVENTS.
  • CHAPTER XLVIII. OF AN ARCHER WHO CROSSING ST. BRIGIT'S HEDGE WAS STRUCK WITH MADNESS
  • AND OF ANOTHER WHO LOST THE USE OF HIS LEG.
  • CHAPTER XLIX. OF THE SEED-WHEAT WHICH, CURSED BY THE BISHOP OF CORK, FAILED TO SPRING UP, AND THE NEXT YEAR WAS MIRACULOUSLY PRODUCED FROM RYE.
  • CHAPTER L. HOW PHILIP OF WORCESTER WAS STRUCK WITH SUDDEN ILLNESS AT ARMAGH, AND HUGH TYRRELL DIVINELY SCOURGED.
  • CHAPTER LI. OF THE MILL WHICH WILL NOT WORK ON SUNDAYS, OR GRIND ANY CORN WHICH HAS BEEN PILFERED OR PILLAGED.
  • CHAPTER LII. OF THE MILL WHICH NO WOMEN ENTER.
  • CHAPTER LIII. HOW TWO HORSES, HAVING FED ON OATS PILLAGED FROM THIS MILL, IMMEDIATELY DIED.
  • CHAPTER LIV. HOW SOME ARCHERS AT FIN GLASS WERE PUNISHED BY HEAVEN.
  • CHAPTER LV. THAT THE SAINTS OF THIS COUNTRY APPEAR TO BE OF A VINDICTIVE TEMPLE.
  • DISTINCTION III. OF THE INHABITANTS OF THIS COUNTRY.
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE FIRST ARRIVAL OF CAESARA, THE GRANDDAUGHTER OF NOAH, BEFORE THE FLOOD.
  • CHAPTER II. HOW BARTHOLANUS WAS THE SECOND IMMIGRANT, THREE HUNDRED YEARS AFTER THE FLOOD.
  • CHAPTER III. HOW, THIRDLY, NEMEDUS CAME FROM THE COUNTRY OF SCYTHIA, WITH HIS FOUR SONS.
  • CHAPTER IV. OF THE FOURTH IMMIGRATION BY THE FIVE BROTHERS AND SONS OF DELA.
  • CHAPTER V. OF SLANIUS, THE FIRST SOLE KING: OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER VI. OF THE FIFTH IMMIGRATION, WHEN THE SONS OF KING MILESIUS CAME OVER FROM SPAIN
  • AND HOW HERIMON AND HEBER DIVIDED THE LAND BETWEEN THEM.
  • CHAPTER VII. HOW THE BROTHERS QUARRELLED, AND HEBER HAVING BEEN SLAIN, HERIMON WAS THE FIRST SOLE KING OF THE IRISH PEOPLE.
  • CHAPTER VIII. OF GURGUNTIUS, KING OF THE BRITONS, WHO BROUGHT OVER THE BASCLENSES TO IRELAND, AND SETTLED THEM IN THE COUNTRY.
  • CHAPTER IX. OF THE TRIPLE, AND NEW, CLAIM.
  • CHAPTER X. OF THE CHARACTER, CUSTOMS, AND HABITS OF THIS PEOPLE.
  • CHAPTER XI. OF THE INCOMPARABLE SKILL OF THE IRISH IN PLAYING UPON MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
  • CHAPTER XII. ON THE BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF MUSIC.
  • CHAPTER XIII. OF THE FIRST INVENTORS OF THE ART OF MUSIC.
  • CHAPTER XIV. OF AN EMINENT PATRON AND IMPROVER OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
  • CHAPTER XV. WHENCE MUSIC DERIVED ITS NAME.
  • CHAPTER XVI. HOW MANY KINGS REIGNED FROM HERIMON TO THE COMING OF PATRICK, BY WHOM THE ISLAND WAS CONVERTED TO THE FAITH.
  • CHAPTER XVII. THAT THERE WERE NO ARCHBISHOPS IN IRELAND BEFORE THE ARRIVAL OF JOHN PAPYRIO, WHO PLANTED THERE FOUR ARCHIEPISCOPAL SEES, IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1152.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. HOW THE BODIES OF THREE SAINTS, PATRICK, COLUMBA, AND BRIGIT, WERE FOUND IN THESE OUR DAYS AT THE CITY. OF DOWN, IN ULSTER, AND TRANSLATED.
  • CHAPTER XIX. HOW THE IRISH ARE VERY IGNORANT OF THE RUDIMENTS OF THE FAITH.
  • CHAPTER XX. OF THEIR ABOMINABLE TREACHERY.
  • CHAPTER XXI. HOW THEY ALWAYS CARRY AN AXE IN THEIR HANDS INSTEAD OF A STAFF.
  • CHAPTER XXII. OF A NEW MODE OF MAKING A LEAGUE: A PROOF OF THEIR WICKEDNESS.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. HOW THEY LOVE THEIR FOSTER-CHILDREN AND FOSTER-BROTHERS, AND HATE THEIR OWN BROTHERS AND KINDRED.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. HOW NEW-COMERS ARE STAINED WITH THE SAME VICES.
  • CHAPTER XXV. OF A NEW AND MONSTROUS WAY OF INAUGURATING THEIR KINGS.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. HOW NUMBERS IN THE ISLAND ARE NOT BAPTIZED, AND HAVE NEVER COME TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAITH.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. OF MANY LAUDABLE QUALITIES IN THE IRISH CLERGY.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. OF THE NEGLECT OF THE PRELATES IN PASTORAL DISCIPLINE.
  • CHAPTER XXIX. HOW NEARLY ALL THE BISHOPS OF IRELAND ARE ELECTED FROM THE MONASTERIES.
  • CHAPTER XXX. HOW THE CLERGY DIFFER FROM MONKS, AND ARE TO BE PREFERRED TO THEM.
  • CHAPTER XXXI. THAT MANY SEEM TO BE IN THE FOLD WHO SHALL BE SHUT OUT
  • AND THE CONTRARY.
  • CHAPTER XXXII. A SARCASTIC REPLY OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF CASHEL.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII. HOW BELLS AND PASTORAL STAVES, AND OTHER SUCH RELICS OF THE SAINTS, ARE HELD IN GREAT REVERENCE BY THE PEOPLE BOTH OF IRELAND, SCOTLAND, AND OF WALES.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV. CONCERNING THE GREAT VIRTUES OF THE PASTORAL STAFF CALLED THE STAFF OF JESUS
  • AND HOW A PRIEST HAD A TWOFOLD DISEASE INFLICTED ON HIM.
  • CHAPTER XXXV. OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONS IN THIS NATION WHO HAVE BODILY DEFECTS.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI. HOW MANY KINGS REIGNED FROM THE TIME OF ST. PATRICK TO THE COMING OF TURGESIUS.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII. HOW IN THE TIME OF KING FEDLIMIDIUS, THE NORWEGIANS, UNDER THEIR CHIEF TURGESIUS, SUBJUGATED IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXVIII. HOW THE ENGLISH SAY THAT IT WAS GURMUND, THE IRISH THAT IT WAS TURGESIUS, WHO CONQUERED THE ISLAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXIX. WHENCE GURMUND CAME INTO IRELAND OR BRITAIN.
  • CHAPTER XL. HOW WHEN GURMUND WAS SLAIN IN GAUL, TUEGESIUS PERISHED IN IRELAND BY THE HANDS OF YOUNG MEN DISGUISED AS GIRLS.
  • CHAPTER XLI. HOW THE NORWEGIANS WERE DRIVEN OUT OF IRELAND, AFTER REIGNING THERE ABOUT THIRTY YEARS.
  • CHAPTER XLII. A SUBTLE QUESTION OF THE KING OF MEATH.
  • CHAPTER XLIII. OF THE ARRIVAL OF THE OSTMEN.
  • CHAPTER XLIV. HOW MANY KINGS REIGNED IN IRELAND FROM THE DEATH OF TURGESIUS TO RODERIC, THE LAST SOLE KING OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XLV. HOW MANY KINGS REIGNED FROM HERIMON, THE FIRST, TO RODERIC, THE LAST.
  • CHAPTER XLVI. HOW FROM ITS FIRST IMMIGRATION TO THE TIME OF TURGESIUS, AND FROM HIS DEATH TO THE EXPEDITION OF HENRY II., KING OF ENGLAND, THE IRISH RACE MAINTAINED ITS INDEPENDENCE.
  • CHAPTER XLVII. OF THE VICTORIES OF HENRY II., KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XLVIII. A SHORT RECAPITULATION OF THE TITLES AND TRIUMPHS OF THE SAME KING.
  • CHAPTER XLIX. OF THE CHARACTERS OF HIS SONS
  • AND FIRST OF HENRY III., KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER L. OF THE CHARACTER OF THE COUNT OF POITOU.
  • CHAPTER LI. OF THE DIFFERENCE IN PERSON AND CHARACTER BETWEEN THE TWO BROTHERS.
  • CHAPTER LII. OF THE PRINCES OF BRITANY AND IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER LIII. HOW THE BROTHERS QUARRELED BETWEEN THEMSELVES, AND WITH THEIR FATHER.
  • CHAPTER LIV. OF THE SAXON, SPANIARD, AND SICILIAN.
  • THE VATICINAL HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF IRELAND.
  • THE AUTHOR'S FIRST PREFACE.
  • THE SECOND PREFACE OF SILVESTER GIRALDUS CAMBRENSIS.
  • THE AUTHOR'S PREFACE TO THE SECOND AND REVISED EDITION OF HIS HISTORY, DEDICATED TO JOHN KING OF ENGLAND.
  • BOOK I.
  • CHAPTER I. HOW DERMITIUS, PRINCE OF LEINSTER, TOOK REFUGE IX ENGLAND, AND WAS RESTORED TO HIS DOMINIONS BY' THE KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER II. THE RETURN OF DERMITIUS THROUGH GREAT BRITAIN.
  • CHAPTER III. THE COMING OVER OF ROBERT FITZ-STEPHEN, AND THE TAKING OF WEXFORD.
  • CHAPTER IV. THE CONQUEST OF OSSORY.
  • CHAPTER V. THE WHOLE OF IRELAND LN LEAGUE AGAINST DERMITIUS AND FITZ-STEPHEN.
  • CHAPTER VI. THE DESCRIPTION OF DERMITIUS, SON OF MURCHARD.
  • CHAPTER VII. RODERIC'S SPEECH.
  • CHAPTER VIII. THE SPEECH OF DERMITIUS.
  • CHAPTER IX. THE SPEECH OF ROBERT FITZ-STEPHEN.
  • CHAPTER X. HOW PEACE WAS RESTORED.
  • CHAPTER XI. THE COMING OVER OF MAURICE FITZGERALD, AND THE CONQUEST OF DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XII. THE PREPARATIONS OF EARL RICHARD.
  • CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OVER OF RAYMOND, AND DEFEAT OF THE MEN OF WATERFORD AT DUNDUNOLF.
  • CHAPTER XIV. RAYMOND'S SPEECH.
  • CHAPTER XV. THE SPEECH OF HERVEY.
  • CHAPTER XVI. THE ARRIVAL OF THE EARL, AND THE CAPTURE OF WATERFORD.
  • CHAPTER XVII. SIEGE AND SURRENDER OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. THE SYNOD OF ARMAGH.
  • CHAPTER XIX. THE PROCLAMATION OF THE KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XX. THE MARTYRDOM OF ST. THOMAS.
  • CHAPTER XXI. THE OVERTHROW OF THE DANES AT DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XXII. THE SIEGE OF DUBLIN BY RODERIC OF CONNAUGHT AND THE MEN OF THE ISLES.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. THE SPEECH OF MAURICE FITZGERALD.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. THE DEFEAT OF RODERIC AT DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XXV. FITZ-STEPHEN IS TREACHEROUSLY TAKEN PRISONER.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. DESCRIPTION OF FITZ-STEPHEN.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. THE DESCRIPTION OF THE EARL.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. HOW PEACE AND AMITY WERE RESTORED BETWEEN THE KING AND THE EARL IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF GLOUCESTER.
  • CHAPTER XXIX. THE DEFEAT OF O'RORIC AT DUBLIN. KING HENRY AT PEMBROKE.
  • CHAPTER XXX. THE ARRIVAL OF THE KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXI. HOW FITZ-STEPHEN WAS RELEASED AT WATERFORD, AND THE PRINCES OF THE WEST OF IRELAND MADE THEIR VOLUNTARY SUBMISSION.
  • CHAPTER XXXII. HOW THE PRINCES OF THE NORTH OF IRELAND, AND RODERIC OF CONNAUGHT, MADE VOLUNTARY SUBMISSION AT DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII. THE SYNOD OF CASHEL.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV. THE CONSTITUTIONS OF THE SYNOD OF CASHEL.
  • CHAPTER XXXV. A TEMPESTUOUS WINTER.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI. A CONSPIRACY AGAINST THE KING. LEGATES ARRIVE FROM THE COURT OF ROME.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII. OF THE KING'S RETURN, BY WAY OF ST. DAVID'S, AND THE LECHLAWAR, OR SPEAKING-STONE.
  • CHAPTER XXXVIII. TERMS ARE SPEEDILY MADE WITH THE POPE'S LEGATES AND THE KING OF FRANCE.
  • CHAPTER XXXIX. OF THE VISION, OR RATHER, THE VISITATION, WHICH THE KING HAD AT CARDIFF.
  • CHAPTER XL. THE TREASON AND DEATH OF O'RORIC.
  • CHAPTER XLI. CONCERNING VISIONS.
  • CHAPTER XLII. A DESCRIPTION OF MAURICE FITZGERALD.
  • CHAPTER XLIII. THE FIRST DISSENSION BETWEEN THE KING AND HIS SONS.
  • CHAPTER XLIV. THE VICTORIES OF HENRY II., KING OF ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XLV. A DESCRIPTION OF HENRY II., KING OF ENGLAND.
  • BOOK II.
  • CHAPTER I. HOW EARL RICHARD WAS SENT BACK TO IRELAND AS CHIEF GOVERNOR, AND THE COMMAND OF THE TROOPS GIVEN TO RAYMOND.
  • CHAPTER II. HOW RAYMOND WAS AGAIN APPOINTED COMMANDER OF THE EARL'S OWN TROOPS.
  • CHAPTER III. THE SLAUGHTER OF THE MEN OF DUBLIN AT OSSORY.
  • CHAPTER IV. HOW RAYMOND WAS RECALLED TO IRELAND, AND MARRIED BASILIA.
  • CHAPTER V. INTERMARRIAGES AMONG THE FAMILIES FROM WALES, AND TERRITORIAL GRANTS.
  • CHAPTER VI. KING HENRY OBTAINS A PAPAL BULL OF RIGHTS.
  • CHAPTER VII. HOW THE KING OF ENGLAND HAS A RIGHT TO IRELAND ON FIVE GROUNDS.
  • CHAPTER VIII. THE NOBLE ASSAULT AND TAKING OF LIMERICK.
  • CHAPTER IX. DESCRIPTION OF RAYMOND.
  • CHAPTER X. DESCRIPTION OF MEYLER.
  • CHAPTER XI. DESCRIPTION OF HERVEY.
  • CHAPTER XII. RELIEF OF THE ROYAL GARRISON IN LIMERICK.
  • CHAPTER XIII. THE SPEECH OF DUVENALD PRINCE OF OSSORY.
  • CHAPTER XIV. THE DEATH OF EARL STRONGBOW IS ANNOUNCED TO RAYMOND.
  • CHAPTER XV. HOW FITZ-ALDELM WAS SENT OVER AS GOVERNOR OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XVI. DESCRIPTION OF FITZ-ALDELM.
  • CHAPTER XVII. THE DESCRIPTION OF JOHN DE COURCY.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. HOW FITZ-ALDELM WAS RECALLED, AND HUGH DE LACY APPOINTED GOVERNOR.
  • CHAPTER XIX. HOW HUGH DE LACY BUILT CASTLES IN IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XX. A DESCRIPTION OF HUGH DE LACY.
  • CHAPTER XXI. THE ARRIVAL OF JOHN THE CONSTABLE AND RICHARD DE PEC.
  • CHAPTER XXII. HOW HUGH DE LACY WAS AGAIN SENT OVER AS GOVERNOR.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. LAURENCE, ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN, DIES AT CHATEAU D'EU, AND IS SUCCEEDED BY JOHN COMYN.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. THE ARRIVAL IN IRELAND OF JOHN, ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN.
  • CHAPTER XXV. ARRIVAL OF THE PATRIARCH HERACLIUS IN ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. THE KING'S REPLY, AND THE PROPHETICAL THREATS OF THE PATRIARCH.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. SUDDEN DISCORD BETWEEN THE KINGS.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. OF THE EMPEROR FREDERICK.
  • CHAPTER XXIX. A VISION, AND THE EXPLANATION THEREOF.
  • CHAPTER XXX. OF THE REMARKABLE EVENTS OF OUR TIMES IN ENGLAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXI. THE FIRST EXPEDITION OF JOHN, THE KING'S SON, TO IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXII. THE COMMENDATION OF FITZ-STEPHEN AND EARL STRONG-BOW
  • AND THEIR DEFENCE.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII. OF THE DELAY AND IMPEDIMENTS TO THE FULL AND COMPLETE CONQUEST OF IRELAND.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV. A BRIEF RECAPITULATION OF CERTAIN EVENTS.
  • CHAPTER XXXV. THE CAUSES OF THE DISASTERS. OF THE COMING TO IRELAND OF JOHN, THE KING'S SON.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI. IN WHAT MANNER IRELAND IS TO BE COMPLETELY CONQUERED.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII. HOW IRELAND OUGHT TO BE GOVERNED.

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