Nutritional Management of Equine Diseases and Special Cases

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 7. Februar 2017
  • |
  • 216 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-19189-6 (ISBN)
 
Nutritional Management of Equine Diseases and Special Cases offers a concise, easy-to-comprehend text for equine veterinarians with questions about commonly encountered nutritional problems.
* Assists veterinarians in supporting equine patients with special nutritional needs
* Focuses on nutritional problems and impact on different body systems
* Covers ponies, miniature horses, draft horses, donkeys, and mules
* Offers complete coverage of common diseases and problems helped by nutrition
* Includes useful chapters on poisonous plants and mycotoxins
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 37,28 MB
978-1-119-19189-6 (9781119191896)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
The editor
Bryan M. Waldridge, DVM, MS, Diplomate, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners (Equine Practice), Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, is the internist at Park Equine Hospital at Woodford in Versailles, Kentucky, USA. Dr. Waldridge also serves as the resident veterinarian at Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, Kentucky, USA.
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 9]
4 - Contributors [Seite 15]
5 - Preface [Seite 17]
6 - Chapter 1 Miniature horses and ponies [Seite 19]
6.1 - 1.1 Miniature Horses [Seite 19]
6.2 - 1.2 General Feeding of Miniature Horses [Seite 19]
6.3 - 1.3 Pony Feeding [Seite 20]
6.4 - References [Seite 20]
7 - Chapter 2 Draft horses, mules, and donkeys [Seite 23]
7.1 - 2.1 Draft Horses [Seite 23]
7.2 - 2.2 Donkeys [Seite 24]
7.3 - 2.3 Mules [Seite 25]
7.4 - References [Seite 25]
8 - Chapter 3 Gastrointestinal system [Seite 27]
8.1 - 3.1 The Association between Nutrition and Colic [Seite 27]
8.1.1 - 3.1.1 Feeds and Colic: Pastures [Seite 27]
8.1.2 - 3.1.2 Feeds and Colic: Dried Forages [Seite 28]
8.1.3 - 3.1.3 Feeds and Colic: Concentrates [Seite 29]
8.1.4 - 3.1.4 General Practices to Prevent Colic [Seite 29]
8.2 - 3.2 Nutritional Plans for Horses with Colic [Seite 30]
8.2.1 - 3.2.1 Identifying Nutritional Status [Seite 30]
8.2.2 - 3.2.2 Nutritional Requirements of Horses with Colic [Seite 31]
8.3 - 3.3 Routes for Feeding Horses Recovering from Colic [Seite 33]
8.3.1 - 3.3.1 Voluntary Intake [Seite 33]
8.3.2 - 3.3.2 Supportive Enteral Nutrition [Seite 35]
8.3.3 - 3.3.3 Parenteral Nutrition [Seite 39]
8.4 - 3.4 Diets for Specific Diseases [Seite 45]
8.4.1 - 3.4.1 Uncomplicated Colic [Seite 45]
8.4.2 - 3.4.2 Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome [Seite 46]
8.4.3 - 3.4.3 Duodenitis/Proximal Jejunitis [Seite 47]
8.4.4 - 3.4.4 Small Intestinal Strangulation [Seite 48]
8.4.5 - 3.4.5 Ileal Impaction (Nonstrangulating Small Intestinal Obstruction) [Seite 49]
8.4.6 - 3.4.6 Ascending (Large) Colon Impactions [Seite 50]
8.4.7 - 3.4.7 Sand Impactions [Seite 52]
8.4.8 - 3.4.8 Enteroliths and Fecaliths [Seite 53]
8.4.9 - 3.4.9 Ascending Colon Displacement [Seite 54]
8.4.10 - 3.4.10 Ascending Colon Volvulus (Large Colon Torsion) [Seite 55]
8.4.11 - 3.4.11 Cecal Impactions [Seite 57]
8.4.12 - 3.4.12 Cecocecal and Cecocolic Intussusception [Seite 57]
8.4.13 - 3.4.13 Descending (Small) Colon Obstructions [Seite 58]
8.4.14 - 3.4.14 Descending (Small) Colon Strangulations [Seite 59]
8.5 - References [Seite 59]
9 - Chapter 4 Muscular system [Seite 69]
9.1 - 4.1 Myopathies Associated with Nutritional Deficiencies [Seite 69]
9.1.1 - 4.1.1 Nutritional Myodegeneration due to Selenium Deficiency [Seite 69]
9.1.2 - 4.1.2 Equine Motor Neuron Disease and Vitamin E Deficiency [Seite 70]
9.1.3 - 4.1.3 Vitamin E Deficient Myopathy [Seite 71]
9.1.4 - 4.1.4 Sporadic Exertional Rhabdomyolysis [Seite 72]
9.2 - 4.2 Nutrigenomics [Seite 73]
9.2.1 - 4.2.1 Chronic Forms of Exertional Rhabdomyolysis [Seite 73]
9.2.2 - 4.2.2 Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy [Seite 77]
9.2.3 - 4.2.3 Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis [Seite 84]
9.3 - References [Seite 86]
10 - Chapter 5 Endocrine system [Seite 91]
10.1 - 5.1 Equine Metabolic Syndrome [Seite 91]
10.1.1 - 5.1.1 Definition of Equine Metabolic Syndrome [Seite 91]
10.1.2 - 5.1.2 Epidemiology [Seite 91]
10.1.3 - 5.1.3 Species, Age, and Sex Predisposition [Seite 91]
10.1.4 - 5.1.4 Genetics and Breed Predisposition [Seite 91]
10.1.5 - 5.1.5 Risk Factors [Seite 92]
10.1.6 - 5.1.6 Geography and Seasonality [Seite 92]
10.1.7 - 5.1.7 Associated Conditions and Disorders [Seite 92]
10.1.8 - 5.1.8 Clinical Presentation [Seite 92]
10.1.9 - 5.1.9 Diagnosis [Seite 98]
10.1.10 - 5.1.10 Treatment [Seite 100]
10.1.11 - 5.1.11 Possible Complications of Treatment or of the Disease Process [Seite 103]
10.1.12 - 5.1.12 Recommended Monitoring [Seite 103]
10.1.13 - 5.1.13 Prognosis and Outcome [Seite 103]
10.1.14 - 5.1.14 Prevention [Seite 103]
10.2 - 5.2 Feeding Horses with Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction [Seite 104]
10.2.1 - 5.2.1 Horses with Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction and Adequate Body Condition [Seite 104]
10.2.2 - 5.2.2 Obese Horses with Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction [Seite 105]
10.2.3 - 5.2.3 Horses with Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction and Thin Body Condition or Horses with PPID that are in Work [Seite 105]
10.3 - 5.3 Pearls and Considerations [Seite 105]
10.3.1 - 5.3.1 Client Education [Seite 105]
10.3.2 - 5.3.2 Veterinary Technician Tips [Seite 106]
10.4 - References [Seite 106]
11 - Chapter 6 Respiratory system [Seite 109]
11.1 - 6.1 Effects of Inhaled Dust and Potential Aeroallergens on Equine Respiratory Disease [Seite 109]
11.2 - 6.2 Respirable Dust Deposition in the Airways [Seite 109]
11.3 - 6.3 Effects of Soaking Hay [Seite 111]
11.4 - 6.4 Effects of Steam Treating Hay [Seite 111]
11.5 - 6.5 Feeding Forage Alternatives [Seite 111]
11.5.1 - 6.5.1 Haylage [Seite 111]
11.5.2 - 6.5.2 Hay Cubes [Seite 111]
11.5.3 - 6.5.3 Pellets [Seite 113]
11.6 - 6.6 Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage [Seite 113]
11.7 - 6.7 Acute Interstitial Pneumonia [Seite 113]
11.8 - References [Seite 113]
12 - Chapter 7 Neurologic system [Seite 115]
12.1 - 7.1 Cervical Vertebral Malformation [Seite 115]
12.2 - 7.2 Botulism [Seite 116]
12.3 - 7.3 Ryegrass Staggers [Seite 117]
12.4 - 7.4 Equine Degenerative Myelopathy and Neuroaxonal Dystrophy [Seite 117]
12.5 - 7.5 Equine Motor Neuron Disease [Seite 118]
12.6 - 7.6 Effect of Form and Dose of Vitamin E on Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Concentrations [Seite 119]
12.7 - References [Seite 120]
13 - Chapter 8 Mycotoxins [Seite 121]
13.1 - 8.1 Aflatoxins [Seite 121]
13.1.1 - 8.1.1 Toxicokinetics [Seite 122]
13.1.2 - 8.1.2 Mechanism of Action [Seite 122]
13.1.3 - 8.1.3 Toxicity and Clinical Signs [Seite 123]
13.1.4 - 8.1.4 Reproductive and Developmental Effects [Seite 123]
13.1.5 - 8.1.5 Treatment [Seite 124]
13.2 - 8.2 Fumonisins [Seite 124]
13.2.1 - 8.2.1 Toxicokinetics [Seite 125]
13.2.2 - 8.2.2 Mechanism of Action [Seite 125]
13.2.3 - 8.2.3 Toxicity and Clinical Signs [Seite 125]
13.2.4 - 8.2.4 Treatment [Seite 126]
13.3 - 8.3 Slaframine [Seite 126]
13.3.1 - 8.3.1 Mechanism of Action [Seite 127]
13.3.2 - 8.3.2 Toxicity and Clinical Signs [Seite 127]
13.3.3 - 8.3.3 Treatment [Seite 127]
13.4 - 8.4 Trichothecenes [Seite 128]
13.4.1 - 8.4.1 Toxicokinetics [Seite 128]
13.5 - 8.5 Mechanism of Action [Seite 129]
13.5.1 - 8.5.1 Toxicity and Clinical Signs [Seite 129]
13.5.2 - 8.5.2 Treatment [Seite 130]
13.6 - 8.6 Zearalenone [Seite 130]
13.6.1 - 8.6.1 Toxicokinetics [Seite 131]
13.6.2 - 8.6.2 Mechanism of Action [Seite 131]
13.6.3 - 8.6.3 Toxicity and Clinical Signs [Seite 131]
13.7 - 8.7 Treatment [Seite 132]
13.8 - 8.8 Concluding Remarks [Seite 132]
13.9 - Acknowledgment [Seite 132]
13.10 - References [Seite 132]
14 - Chapter 9 Poisonous plants [Seite 137]
14.1 - 9.1 Excessive Salivation Induced by Plants [Seite 137]
14.2 - 9.2 Colic and Diarrhea-Inducing Plants [Seite 139]
14.2.1 - 9.2.1 Horse Chestnut or Buckeye [Seite 139]
14.2.2 - 9.2.2 Field Bindweed (Morning Glory) [Seite 140]
14.2.3 - 9.2.3 Oak [Seite 141]
14.2.4 - 9.2.4 Mountain Laurel [Seite 142]
14.2.5 - 9.2.5 Pokeweed [Seite 143]
14.2.6 - 9.2.6 Buttercups [Seite 144]
14.2.7 - 9.2.7 Castor Oil Plant [Seite 144]
14.2.8 - 9.2.8 Jimson Weed, Potato, and Tomato [Seite 146]
14.2.9 - 9.2.9 Kentucky Coffee Tree [Seite 147]
14.3 - 9.3 Photodermatitis-Inducing Plants [Seite 147]
14.3.1 - 9.3.1 Primary Photosensitization [Seite 147]
14.3.2 - 9.3.2 Secondary Photosensitization [Seite 149]
14.3.3 - 9.3.3 Liver Disease-Inducing Plants [Seite 149]
14.4 - 9.4 Neurologic Disease-Inducing Plants [Seite 156]
14.4.1 - 9.4.1 Sagebrush [Seite 157]
14.4.2 - 9.4.2 Locoweeds and Milkvetches [Seite 158]
14.4.3 - 9.4.3 Milkvetch Neurotoxicosis [Seite 161]
14.4.4 - 9.4.4 Yellow Star Thistle and Russian Knapweed [Seite 161]
14.4.5 - 9.4.5 Horsetail [Seite 163]
14.4.6 - 9.4.6 White Snakeroot and Crofton, Jimmy, or Burrow Weeds [Seite 163]
14.4.7 - 9.4.7 Bracken Fern [Seite 164]
14.4.8 - 9.4.8 Johnsongrass and Sudangrass [Seite 165]
14.5 - 9.5 Lameness and Muscle Weakness?Inducing Plants [Seite 167]
14.5.1 - 9.5.1 Black Walnut [Seite 167]
14.5.2 - 9.5.2 Hoary Alyssum [Seite 168]
14.5.3 - 9.5.3 Coffee Weed or Coffee Senna [Seite 168]
14.6 - 9.6 Plant-Induced Calcinosis [Seite 169]
14.6.1 - 9.6.1 Day-Blooming Jessamine [Seite 170]
14.6.2 - 9.6.2 Flatweed [Seite 171]
14.7 - 9.7 Selenium Toxicosis [Seite 171]
14.7.1 - 9.7.1 Causes of Selenium Toxicosis [Seite 172]
14.7.2 - 9.7.2 Two-Grooved Milkvetch (Astragalus bisulcatus) [Seite 173]
14.7.3 - 9.7.3 False Golden Weed (Oonopsis species) [Seite 173]
14.7.4 - 9.7.4 Woody Aster (Xylorhiza glabriuscula) [Seite 173]
14.7.5 - 9.7.5 Prince's Plume (Stanleya pinnata) [Seite 173]
14.7.6 - 9.7.6 White Prairie Aster (Aster falcatus) [Seite 173]
14.7.7 - 9.7.7 Broom, Turpentine, Snake, or Match Weed (Gutierrezia sarothrae) [Seite 174]
14.7.8 - 9.7.8 Gumweed or resinweed (Grindelia spp.) [Seite 175]
14.7.9 - 9.7.9 Saltbush (Atriplex spp.) [Seite 175]
14.7.10 - 9.7.10 Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.) [Seite 175]
14.7.11 - 9.7.11 Beard Tongue (Penstemon spp.) [Seite 175]
14.7.12 - 9.7.12 Effects of Acute Selenium Toxicosis [Seite 176]
14.7.13 - 9.7.13 Effects of Chronic Selenium Toxicosis [Seite 177]
14.7.14 - 9.7.14 Diagnosis of Selenium Toxicosis [Seite 178]
14.8 - 9.8 Anemia-Inducing Plants [Seite 179]
14.8.1 - 9.8.1 Onions [Seite 180]
14.8.2 - 9.8.2 Red Maple [Seite 180]
14.8.3 - 9.8.3 Spoiled Sweet Clover [Seite 181]
14.9 - 9.9 Teratogenic Plants [Seite 182]
14.10 - 9.10 Sudden Death-Inducing Plants [Seite 183]
14.10.1 - 9.10.1 Cyanide-Induced Sudden Death [Seite 184]
14.10.2 - 9.10.2 Toxicity of Cyanogenic Glycosides [Seite 185]
14.10.3 - 9.10.3 Serviceberry or Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia) [Seite 185]
14.10.4 - 9.10.4 Wild Blue Flax (Linum spp.) [Seite 185]
14.10.5 - 9.10.5 Western Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) [Seite 185]
14.10.6 - 9.10.6 Elderberry (Sambuccus spp.) [Seite 186]
14.10.7 - 9.10.7 Sorghum Grasses [Seite 186]
14.10.8 - 9.10.8 Arrow grass or goose grass (Triglochin spp.) [Seite 187]
14.10.9 - 9.10.9 Clinical Effects and Diagnosis of Acute Cyanide Poisoning [Seite 187]
14.10.10 - 9.10.10 Treatment of Acute Cyanide Poisoning [Seite 188]
14.10.11 - 9.10.11 Cardiac Glycoside-Induced Sudden Death [Seite 188]
14.11 - 9.11 Larkspur [Seite 193]
14.12 - 9.12 Monkshood [Seite 194]
14.13 - 9.13 Poison Hemlock [Seite 194]
14.14 - 9.14 Water Hemlock [Seite 195]
14.15 - 9.15 Yew [Seite 196]
14.16 - 9.16 Death Camas [Seite 197]
14.17 - 9.17 Avocado [Seite 198]
14.18 - Glossary [Seite 198]
14.19 - Supplemental Reading [Seite 199]
14.20 - References [Seite 200]
15 - Index [Seite 207]
16 - EULA [Seite 214]
"This is a long overdue addition to the veterinary literature. It helps to demystify the nutritional implications of many commonly seen diseases in a practical, useful, and easily implemented manner. There is no comparable book in the field with this comprehensive information. For even experienced equine practitioners, it will be a useful addition to the library as a resource for determining dietary recommendations for clients." (Doody Enterprises 02/06/2017)

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

80,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen