Model-based System and Architecture Engineering with the Arcadia Method

 
 
ISTE Press - Elsevier
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 22. November 2017
  • |
  • 388 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-101794-4 (ISBN)
 

This book presents ARCADIA-a tooled method devoted to systems and architecture engineering, especially for those dealing with strong constraints to be reconciled (cost, performance, safety, security, reuse, consumption, weight). The book describes the detailed reasoning necessary to: understand the real customer need; define and share the product architecture among all engineering stakeholders; early validate its design and justify it; and ease and master integration, validation, verification and qualification (IVVQ).

  • Offers a comprehensive examination of systems engineering, including the use of models to support it
  • Not only yet another book on modeling, but rather a journey in systems engineering, enlightening the use of models to support it.
  • Focuses on solitary modeling tasks while also covering prime collaborations between engineering stakeholders
  • Examines modeling techniques to capture and share architecture and to early verify it against need and non-functional constraints
  • Addresses subjects not usually covered by model-based system engineering (MBSE) methods, such as co-engineering with specialties, system/sub-system co-engineering, integration verification and validation
  • Features a powerful, dedicated tool (Capella)
  • Covers a range of topics, including an introduction to system engineering issues, an introduction to MBSE, a presentation of the method for beginners and a handy reference manual for advanced users


Jean-Luc Voirin is currently in charge of technical strategy, new methods definition and deployment/coaching in large programs of systems & software engineering and architectures, along with the definition of toolsuites able to support these new practices, at Thales Group level.
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • Großbritannien
Elsevier Science
  • 54,89 MB
978-0-08-101794-4 (9780081017944)
0081017944 (0081017944)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Dedication
  • Model-based System and Architecture Engineering with the Arcadia Method
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Objectives of this book and foreword
  • Organization of the book
  • Suggestions for quick reading
  • Acknowledgments
  • Part 1: Foundations of the Method: General Approach and Major Prospects
  • 1. Motivations, Background and Introduction to Arcadia
  • 1.1. Context and challenges
  • 1.2. A bit of history: the creation of a method
  • 1.3. Scope of application of Arcadia
  • 1.4. Arcadia presentation
  • 2. Main Perspectives Structuring the Modeling Approach
  • 2.1. From the need to the solution
  • 2.2. Overview of the main concepts
  • 2.3. An illustrative example: traffic regulation in the vicinity of a level crossing
  • 3. Adaptation to Project Context and Life Cycle
  • 3.1. Iterative or incremental approach
  • 3.2. Scheduling activities
  • 3.3. Top-down or bottom-up approach
  • 3.4. Progressive and focused architecture construction
  • 3.5. Activity adjustment and adaptation to a particular area
  • 4. General Approach to Functional Analysis
  • 4.1. The role of functional analysis in Arcadia
  • 4.2. General principles of functional analysis in Arcadia
  • 4.3. Functional analysis construction approach
  • 5. Operational Analysis
  • 5.1. Principles
  • 5.2. Define missions and required operational capabilities
  • 5.3. Perform operational needs analysis
  • 5.4. Summary
  • 5.5. Exercise
  • 6. System Needs Analysis
  • 6.1. Principles
  • 6.2. Performing a capability compromise analysis
  • 6.3. Performing a functional and non-functional needs analysis
  • 6.4. Formalizing and consolidating the expression of system needs
  • 6.5. Summary
  • 6.6. Exercise
  • 7. Definition of the Principle Architecture or Logical Architecture
  • 7.1. Principles
  • 7.2. Definition of the factors impacting the architecture and analysis viewpoints
  • 7.3. Definition of the behavior principles of the system
  • 7.4. Construction of component-based system structuring alternatives
  • 7.5. Selection of the architecture alternative offering the best trade-off
  • 7.6. Summary
  • 7.7. Exercise
  • 8. Definition of the Finalized Architecture or Physical Architecture
  • 8.1. Principles
  • 8.2. Definition of the structuring principles of the architecture and behavior
  • 8.3. Detail and finalization of the expected system behavior
  • 8.4. Construction and rationalization of one or more possible system architectures
  • 8.5. Selection, completion and justification of the system architecture retained
  • 8.6. Summary
  • 8.7. Exercise
  • 9. Definition of Implementation, Development, Acquisition and Integration Contracts
  • 9.1. Principles
  • 9.2. Definition of the product breakdown structure
  • 9.3. Finalization of development contracts of components to be implemented
  • 9.4. Consolidation of the definition of components to be acquired
  • 9.5. Definition of the IVV strategy
  • 9.6. Summary
  • Part 2: Method in Action: Using Engineering Models
  • 10. Mixing Viewpoints: Analysis and Specialties
  • 10.1. Justification
  • 10.2. Principles behind the approach
  • 10.3. An illustration of some viewpoints
  • 10.4. Summary
  • 11. Requirements Engineering and Modeling
  • 11.1. Limits of engineering based only on informal requirements
  • 11.2. Using models as a support for expressing requirements
  • 11.3. Link between informal and model requirements
  • 11.4. Structuring requirements and the model
  • 11.5. Summary
  • 12. Integration, Verification and Validation Approach
  • 12.1. Defining and implementing the test strategy
  • 12.2. Verifying model requirements
  • 12.3. Definition and use of scenarios and functional chains in IVV
  • 12.4. Verifying informal requirements
  • 12.5. Summary
  • 13. Articulation between Engineering Levels
  • 13.1. Principles of the coengineering approach
  • 13.2. Responsibility and limits of each engineering
  • 13.3. Articulation by informal requirements only
  • 13.4. Model-based articulation
  • 13.5. Articulation with the customer
  • 13.6. Summary
  • 14. System Supervision, States and Modes
  • 14.1. Introduction to supervision
  • 14.2. Principles and concepts
  • 14.3. Articulation between states and modes in Arcadia perspectives
  • 14.4. Approach to defining states and modes and the system supervision
  • 14.5. Designing supervision associated with system and components states and modes
  • 14.6. Using the model for startup and shutdown procedures
  • 14.7. Summary
  • 15. Contribution to Product Line Engineering
  • 15.1. Context and position of the problem
  • 15.2. General approach to product line engineering
  • 15.3. Joint construction of architecture and product variability
  • 15.4. Additive or compositional engineering by building blocks
  • 15.5. Articulating system and subsystem product lines
  • 15.6. Summary
  • Part 3: Encyclopedia of the Language and Glossary of the Concepts of Arcadia
  • 16. Introduction to Arcadia Modeling Language
  • 16.1. The perimeter addressed
  • 16.2. The logic behind presenting these concepts
  • 16.3. Conventions for representation in figures and diagrams
  • 17. Concepts of Functional and Operational Description
  • 17.1. Concepts and relationships of functional description
  • 17.2. Function
  • 17.3. Function port
  • 17.4. Functional exchange and exchange category
  • 17.5. Synthetic representation of functions and functional exchanges
  • 17.6. Dataflow and flow control functions
  • 17.7. System mission
  • 17.8. System capability
  • 17.9. Functional chain
  • 17.10. Function scenario
  • 17.11. Orchestration
  • 17.12. Concepts and functional relationships in operational analysis
  • 17.13. Operational activity
  • 17.14. Operational interaction
  • 17.15. Operational mission
  • 17.16. Operational capability
  • 17.17. Operational process
  • 17.18. Operational activity scenario
  • 18. Concepts of States and Modes
  • 18.1. Concepts and relationships involved in states and modes
  • 18.2. Mode
  • 18.3. State
  • 18.4. Transition
  • 18.5. Mode/state machine
  • 18.6. Configuration
  • 18.7. Situation
  • 19. Concepts of Structural Description
  • 19.1. Concepts and relationships of structural description
  • 19.2. System
  • 19.3. Actor
  • 19.4. Component
  • 19.5. Behavioral component
  • 19.6. Behavioral port
  • 19.7. Behavioral exchange
  • 19.8. Logical component
  • 19.9. Hosting physical component
  • 19.10. Physical port
  • 19.11. Physical link
  • 19.12. Physical path
  • 19.13. Behavioral component scenario
  • 19.14. Structural concepts and relationships in operational analysis
  • 19.15. Operational entity and actor
  • 19.16. Communication means
  • 19.17. Configuration item
  • 20. Links between Functional and Structural Descriptions
  • 20.1. Concepts and relationships between functional and structural descriptions
  • 20.2. Performing functions
  • 20.3. Implementing functional ports
  • 20.4. Implementing functional exchanges
  • 20.5. Functional path
  • 20.6. Functional component scenario
  • 20.7. Links between dataflow, states and modes, and scenarios or functional chains
  • 20.8. Links between functional and structural descriptions in operational analysis
  • 20.9. Simplifications in representation
  • 21. Data Exchange Concepts and Links with Functional and Structural Concepts
  • 21.1. Concepts and relationships involved in data exchanges and their use
  • 21.2. Exchange item
  • 21.3. Data model, class
  • 21.4. Allocating exchange items to functional ports and exchanges
  • 21.5. Allocating exchange items to behavioral exchanges
  • 21.6. Types and instances of data
  • 21.7. Interfaces
  • 21.8. Allocating interfaces to behavioral component ports
  • 21.9. Links between exchanges, exchange items and interfaces
  • 21.10. Interaction roles and interface usage
  • 21.11. Interaction protocol
  • 22. Additional Concepts
  • 22.1. Concepts for product line engineering
  • 22.2. Concepts for the integration, verification and validation approach
  • 22.3. Other concepts not detailed here
  • 23. Building the Global Model
  • 23.1. The structure of an Arcadia model
  • 23.2. Model segmentation to support alternatives
  • 23.3. Using language concepts in perspectives
  • 23.4. Scope of links in the model
  • 23.5. Traceability between model elements
  • 23.6. Replicable Element Collection and Replica
  • Conclusion and Perspectives
  • Lessons drawn from developing and using Arcadia
  • Perspectives and future work
  • For a community of contributors and users
  • Appendix: Introduction to Capella: The Benchmark Modeling Tool for Arcadia
  • A.1. The close link between the method and the tool
  • A.2. Productivity tools for modeling
  • A.3. Mastering complexity
  • A.4. Free and open source access, extensibility
  • Bibliography
  • Language, formalities, approaches to engineering
  • Publications concerning the preliminary works at Arcadia
  • Publications on Arcadia
  • Hyperlinks for information about Arcadia and Capella
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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