Progress in Optics

 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 8. April 2016
  • |
  • 422 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-444-63721-5 (ISBN)
 

The Progress in Optics series contains more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments, helping optical scientists and optical engineers stay abreast of their fields.


  • Comprehensive, in-depth reviews
  • Edited by the leading authority in the field


Professor Taco Visser works at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
0079-6638
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • Niederlande
Elsevier Science
  • 12,03 MB
978-0-444-63721-5 (9780444637215)
0444637214 (0444637214)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Progress in Optics
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Computational Optics Through Sequence Transformations
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Why Levin-Type Sequence Transformations?
  • 2.1. Preliminaries
  • 2.2. Padé Approximants and Wynn´s Epsilon Algorithm
  • 2.3. Levin´s Transformation
  • 2.4. Weniger´s Transformation
  • 2.5. Summing Series with Levin-Type Transformations: The Case of the Euler Series
  • 3. Decoding Divergent Series in Optics
  • 3.1. Maxwell´s Equations and Beam Optics: The Lax-Louisell-McKnight Series
  • 3.2. Using Sequence Transformations to Sum LLM Series: The On-Axis Field of Linearly Polarized Gaussian Beams
  • 3.3. A Proof of Factorial Divergence of Typical LLM Series
  • 4. Numerical Exploration of the Diffraction Catastrophe Zoo
  • 4.1. Catastrophe Optics: A Brief History
  • 4.2. Berry´s Classification of Diffraction Catastrophes
  • 4.3. Numerical Computation of Diffraction Catastrophes via Sequence Transformations: Asymptotic Expansions
  • 4.4. Numerical Evaluation of Diffraction Catastrophes by Taylor-Like Expansions
  • 4.4.1. Accurate Evaluation of the Airy Function
  • 4.4.2. PsiA3 Diffraction Catastrophe: The Cusp
  • 4.5. How Does Weniger´s Transformation Work on Diffraction Catastrophes?
  • 4.6. Higher-Order Cuspoid Diffraction Catastrophes
  • 4.6.1. The PsiA4 Cuspoid Diffraction Catastrophe: The Swallowtail
  • 4.6.2. The PsiA5 Diffraction Catastrophe: The Butterfly
  • 4.7. Stable and Unstable Umbilics
  • 4.7.1. Elliptic and Hyperbolic Umbilics D4±
  • 4.7.2. The Parabolic Umbilic D5
  • 4.8. The X9 Diffraction Catastrophe
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Coherence of Supercontinuum Light
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. SC Generation
  • 3. Coherence of Nonstationary Light
  • 3.1. Second-Order Coherence Functions
  • 3.2. Coherent-Mode Representations
  • 3.3. Representations in Terms of Elementary Coherent Fields
  • 4. Spectral and Temporal Coherence
  • 4.1. Construction of Correlation Functions from Field Realizations
  • 4.2. Partition of SC Correlation Functions
  • 4.3. Assessment of SC Simulation Results
  • 4.4. Coherent-Mode Representation of SC
  • 4.5. Elementary-Field Representation of SC
  • 5. Spatial Coherence
  • 5.1. General Theory
  • 5.2. Propagation in Optical Systems
  • 6. Experimental Perspectives
  • 6.1. Spectral Interference Experiments
  • 6.2. Characterization of Second-Order Coherence
  • 7. Conclusions and Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Quantum Optomechanics
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Brief Historical Review
  • 1.2. Structure of the Chapter
  • 1.3. Notations, Approximations, and Assumptions
  • 2. Experimental Background
  • 2.1. Mechanical Test Objects
  • 2.1.1. The Thermal Noise Issue
  • 2.1.2. Review of the Mechanical Test Objects
  • 2.1.2.1. Test Masses of the Laser GW Detectors
  • 2.1.2.2. Small ``Ordinary´´ Mirrors
  • 2.1.2.3. SiN Membranes
  • 2.1.2.4. Membranes Mounted by Means of Phononic Bandgap Bridges
  • 2.1.2.5. Photonic Crystal Cavities
  • 2.1.2.6. Microwave Devices
  • 2.1.2.7. Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators
  • 2.1.2.8. Concluding Remarks
  • 2.2. Optical Topologies
  • 2.2.1. Standard Optomechanical Schemes
  • 2.2.1.1. Lumped LC Circuit
  • 2.2.1.2. Fabry-Perot Cavity
  • 2.2.1.3. ``Membrane-in-the-Middle´´ Interferometer
  • 2.2.1.4. Michelson/Fabry-Perot Interferometer
  • 2.2.1.5. Michelson-Sagnac Interferometer
  • 2.2.2. Modern Experimental Implementations
  • 2.2.2.1. Measures of Optomechanical Coupling
  • 2.2.2.2. Large-Scale Laser GW Detectors
  • 2.2.2.3. Table-Top Fabry-Perot Cavity Setup
  • 2.2.2.4. Michelson-Sagnac Interferometer
  • 2.2.2.5. ``Membrane-in-the-Middle´´ Interferometer
  • 2.2.2.6. Photonic Crystal Cavities
  • 2.2.2.7. Microwave Lumped LC Circuits
  • 3. Quantum Noise of Parametric Transducer
  • 3.1. The SQL
  • 3.1.1. Generic Spectral Form
  • 3.1.2. Free Mass
  • 3.1.2.1. Introduction
  • 3.1.2.2. Quantum Noise of Simple Resonance Parametric Transducer
  • 3.1.3. Harmonic Oscillator
  • 3.1.3.1. Introduction
  • 3.1.3.2. Bad Cavity Regime
  • 3.1.3.3. Resonance-Resolved Sideband Regime
  • 3.1.4. Other Spectral Forms of the SQL
  • 3.1.4.1. x-Normalization
  • 3.1.4.2. h-Normalization
  • 3.1.5. Integrated Form of the SQL
  • 3.2. QND Measurements
  • 3.2.1. The Idea of QND Measurement
  • 3.2.2. Measurement of Mechanical Quadrature
  • 3.2.3. Approximate QND Measurement of Mechanical Quadrature
  • 3.3. Overcoming the SQL by Means of Quantum Noise Cancelation
  • 3.3.1. Basic Principles of Quantum Noise Cancelation
  • 3.3.2. Sensitivity Limit for Continuous Position Measurements
  • 3.3.3. Quantum Speed Meter
  • 3.3.3.1. Speed Measurement as a QND Procedure
  • 3.3.3.2. Speed Measurement as Noise Cancelation Technique
  • 3.4. Experimental Results
  • 3.4.1. Measurement Noise Below the SQL
  • 3.4.2. Observation of Radiation Pressure Noise
  • 4. Dynamic Back-Action of the Parametric Transducer
  • 4.1. Electromagnetic Rigidity
  • 4.1.1. Physical Origin of the Electromagnetic Rigidity
  • 4.1.2. Noise Temperature of the Electromagnetic Rigidity
  • 4.2. Optical Cooling
  • 4.2.1. General Theory
  • 4.2.2. Cavity-Assisted Sideband Cooling
  • 4.2.3. Some Experimental Results and Concluding Remarks
  • 4.3. Optical Spring in High-Precision Force Measurements
  • 4.3.1. Introduction
  • 4.3.2. Optical Spring in Table-Top MQM Experiments
  • 4.3.2.1. Effective Rigidity
  • 4.3.2.2. Bad Cavity Approximations
  • 4.3.2.3. Dilution of the Thermal Noise
  • 4.3.3. Cancelation of Mechanical Rigidity and Inertia
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Appendix A. Quantization of Running Optical Wave
  • A.1. Notations
  • A.2. Optical Field Amplitudes
  • A.3. Two-Photon Quadratures
  • A.4. Interaction of Optical Field with a Single Mirror
  • Appendix B. Standard Optomechanical Schemes
  • B.1. Lumped LC Circuit
  • B.2. Fabry-Perot Cavity
  • B.2.1. Optical Fields
  • B.2.2. Single-Mode Approximation
  • B.3. Membrane-in-the-Middle
  • B.3.1. Optical Fields
  • B.3.2. Single-Mode Approximation
  • B.4. Michelson-Sagnac Interferometer
  • B.4.1. Optical Fields
  • B.4.2. Single-Mode Approximation
  • Appendix C. Quantum Noise Spectral Densities of the Parametric Transducer
  • C.1. Constant Pump Power
  • C.2. Oscillating Pump Power
  • Appendix D. Effective Quantum Noise Spectral Densities
  • D.1. General Case
  • D.2. Resonance-Resolved Sideband Regime
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Light Modes of Free Space
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Waves
  • 1.2. Beams
  • 1.2.1. Equation
  • 1.2.2. Wave-Originated Gaussian Beams Solution
  • 1.3. Classification
  • 1.4. Orthogonality and Completeness
  • 1.4.1. Orthogonality
  • 1.4.2. Completeness
  • 1.4.3. Example: Gaussian Propagation by the Airy Transform
  • 1.5. Countability
  • 1.6. Diffraction Characteristics
  • 1.6.1. No Diffraction
  • 1.6.2. Expansion
  • 1.6.3. Acceleration
  • 1.6.4. Acceleration and Slow Diffraction
  • 1.6.5. Diffraction
  • 2. Waves
  • 2.1. Angular Spectrum
  • 2.2. Cartesian Coordinates: Plane Waves
  • 2.3. Circular-Cylindrical Coordinates: Bessel Waves
  • 2.4. Parabolic-Cylindrical Coordinates: Weber Waves
  • 2.5. Elliptical-Cylindrical Coordinates: Mathieu Waves
  • 3. Beams
  • 3.1. Cartesian Coordinates
  • 3.1.1. Plane Infinite Beams
  • 3.1.2. Airy Infinite Beams
  • 3.1.3. Airy Finite Beams
  • 3.1.4. Airy-Airy Beams
  • 3.1.5. Airy-Plane Beams
  • 3.1.6. Hermite-Gauss Beams
  • 3.1.7. Plane-Gauss Beams
  • 3.2. Circular-Cylindrical coordinates
  • 3.2.1. Laguerre-Gauss Beams
  • 3.2.2. Bessel-Gauss Beams
  • 3.3. Parabolic-Cylindrical coordinates
  • 3.3.1. Parabolic Infinite Beams
  • 3.3.2. Parabolic Finite Beams
  • 3.3.3. Weber-Gauss Beams
  • 3.4. Elliptical-Cylindrical coordinates
  • 3.4.1. Ince-Gauss Beams
  • 3.4.2. Mathieu-Gauss Beams
  • 4. Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Polarization in Quantum Optics
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Electric Field Wave Functions and Trajectories
  • 3. Stokes Operators and Coherent States
  • 3.1. Basic Definitions
  • 3.2. Polarization Sectors
  • 3.3. Polarization Transformations
  • 3.4. Poincaré Sphere and SU(2) Invariance
  • 3.5. Tangent-Plane Approximation
  • 3.6. Coherent States
  • 3.7. Spin Equivalence
  • 3.8. Interferometric Equivalence
  • 3.9. Measurement
  • 3.10. Uncertainty Relations
  • 4. Phase-Space Pictures
  • 4.1. Basic Settings
  • 4.2. Polarization Marginals
  • 4.3. SU(2) Kernels
  • 4.4. Characteristic Functions
  • 4.5. Discrete Phase-Space Pictures
  • 5. Hidden Polarization and Degrees of Polarization
  • 5.1. Unpolarized Light
  • 5.2. Fully Polarized Light
  • 5.3. Intensity Normalization
  • 5.4. Distances to Unpolarized Light
  • 5.5. Metrological Usefulness
  • 5.6. Other Measures
  • 5.7. The One-PhotonCase
  • 6. Nonclassical Polarization
  • 6.1. Direct Sampling of P Function
  • 6.2. Bounds on Probabilities
  • 6.3. Nonclassicality from Joint Statistics
  • 6.4. Nonclassicality of Coherent States
  • 6.5. Polarization Squeezing
  • 6.6. General Nonclassicality Witness
  • 6.7. Orthogonal Polarizations
  • 6.8. Coherent Superpositions of Coherent States
  • 6.9. Nonclassicality and Quantum Computation
  • 7. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index
  • Contents of Previous Volumes
  • Cumulative index - volumes 1-61
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

190,40 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok