Floods

Volume 2- Risk Management
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. November 2017
  • |
  • 424 Seiten
 
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978-0-08-102384-6 (ISBN)
 

The management of flood risk seems to be facing a daunting paradox. Despite increasingly effective risk knowledge tools and the efforts of international institutions to place risk reduction at the top of the agenda, the cost of disasters continues to increase. It is also increasingly difficult to avoid the urbanization or development of potential flood zones. The fundamental issue involves determining the conditions necessary for efficient prevention by focusing on adaptability to risk, which implies coping with the risk of flooding rather than directly fighting against it or simply ignoring it.

This second volume of the Floods series of books explores existing policies and tools which mitigate the impact of flooding: the construction of protective structures, the reduction of vulnerability, land use planning, the improvement of crisis management, etc. The closing chapters focus on the question of adaptation through post-flood reconstruction, integrating disaster risk reduction measures, e.g. through resilient urbanism.

  • Presents the state-of-the-art surrounding flood issues, from the description of the phenomena, to the management of risk (dikes, dams, reducing vulnerability and management of crisis)
  • Written by specialists, but accessible to mainstream scientists
  • Exposes knowledge, methodologies, scientific locks and the prospects of each discipline on the theme of floods
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 59,23 MB
978-0-08-102384-6 (9780081023846)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Floods 2: Risk Management
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Introduction: Flood Risk Management
  • I.1. Political issues concerning flood risk management
  • I.2. Cycle or trajectory?
  • I.3. Is "marginal risk" acceptable?
  • I.4. Specific versus generic approach
  • I.5. Volume contents
  • I.6. Bibliography
  • Part 1: Strategic and Technical Aspects of Flood Prevention
  • 1. Flood Management in France from 18th to 20th Centuries: A State Issue?
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Forecast and alert: from local empiricism to regional monitoring networks
  • 1.3. Managing flood events and their immediate impacts: collaboration between the State and local authorities
  • 1.4. Rebuilding and prevention: a slow and uneven change in scale
  • 1.5. Conclusion
  • 1.6. Bibliography
  • 2. The French Flood Risk Management Model: Local Territories Facing State Omnipresency
  • 2.1. Introduction: French policy on flood risk management
  • 2.2. Insurance component of the 1982 legislation
  • 2.3. Prevention component of the 1982 legislation
  • 2.4. PPR tool and characteristics of territories
  • 2.5. Dikes and urbanization beyond flood defenses
  • 2.6. From policy focused on the use of PPRs to more integrated management of flood risk
  • 2.7. 10-year plan: restoration and maintenance of rivers (1994-2002)
  • 2.8. Flood Prevention Action Programs
  • 2.9. The implementation of the Flood Directive: renewing risk prevention policy, or a big mess?
  • 2.10. A new skill for local government: management of aquatic environments and floods (GEMAPI)
  • 2.11. Conclusion
  • 2.12. Bibliography
  • 3. Management and Safety of Flood Defense Systems
  • 3.1. Limitations of levees
  • 3.2. Failure modes
  • 3.3. Levee assessment and system risk analysis
  • 3.4. Conclusion
  • 3.5. Bibliography
  • 4. Coping Strategies in Dike Protected Areas
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Challenges concerning diked up areas
  • 4.3. What strategies should be adopted?
  • 4.4. Option 1: focusing on dikes
  • 4.5. Option 2: treating dikes as simple tools
  • 4.6. Option 3: combining flood defense systems and protected assets
  • 4.7. Conclusion
  • 4.8. Bibliography
  • 5. Floods and Land Rights: From Risk Prevention Plans to Administrative Accountability and Penal Liability
  • 5.1. From emergency relief to flood risk prevention
  • 5.2. Legislative overhaul of the flood risk management framework based on effective control of urban planning: the primary line of defense against flood risk
  • 5.3. Land rights versus flood risk
  • 5.4. Collective responsibility: second line of defense against flood risk
  • 5.5. Conclusion
  • 5.6. Bibliography
  • 6. How Cost-Effective is Reducing the Vulnerability of Housing in Response to Flood Risk?
  • 6.1. A policy that struggles to anchor itself within the territory
  • 6.2. Two possible technical strategies exist in terms of reducing vulnerability of existing housing
  • 6.3. Less cost-effective than first thought
  • 6.4. Conclusion: rethinking current policy on vulnerability reduction of housing
  • 6.5. Bibliography
  • Part 2: Territories and Individuals at the Heartof Prevention
  • 7. Does the Watershed Represent a Key Area within Flood Risk Knowledge and Management?
  • 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. The watershed: institutionally referenced for knowledge and management of flood risk and for the implementation of structural measures
  • 7.3. Flooded areas: points of reference for residents
  • 7.4. Complementarity between knowledge and management of flood risk across flooded areas and risk catchment areas is required
  • 7.5. Conclusion
  • 8. Sustainable Land Use Planning in Areas Exposed to Flooding: Some International Experiences
  • 8.1. Introduction
  • 8.2. How to regulate land uses in front of the flood hazard?
  • 8.3. International examples
  • 8.4. Conclusion
  • 8.5. Bibliography
  • 9. Societal Choices in Flood Risk Management, from Individual Responsibility to National Policy
  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. The impact of national, regional and local policy
  • 9.3. Societal choices
  • 9.4. Individual responsibility
  • 9.5. National choices
  • 9.6. Conclusion
  • 9.7. Bibliography
  • 10. "Sustainable Flood Memories": Developing Concept, Process and Practice in Flood Risk Management
  • 10.1. Introduction
  • 10.2. What is the concept of Sustainable Flood Memories?
  • 10.3. What are the processes of Sustainable Flood Memory?
  • 10.4. How can the practice of Sustainable Flood Memory be developed?
  • 10.5. Conclusion
  • 10.6. Acknowledgements
  • 10.7. Bibliography
  • 11. Integrating Anthropocentric Approaches into Flood Risk Management
  • 11.1. Adapting perspectives to local characteristics
  • 11.2. Developing information and communication
  • 11.3. Conclusion
  • 11.4. Bibliography
  • Part 3: Anticipating and Managing Flood Events
  • 12. Characteristics of Flood Events
  • 12.1. The nature of flood events as a crisis
  • 12.2. Flood characteristics
  • 12.3. Mental representations: long-term trends at the root of the crisis
  • 12.4. Techniques and behavior
  • 12.5. Conclusion
  • 12.6. Bibliography
  • 13. Effectiveness of Institutional Alert Tools in Flood Forecasting in France
  • 13.1. Introduction
  • 13.2. Flood alerts and warnings: two different significations
  • 13.3. Notification procedure: a process heavily managed by the State
  • 13.4. The effectiveness of institutional alert tools: from theory to reality
  • 13.5. Limitations and pathways for expected improvement
  • 13.6. Conclusion
  • 13.7. Bibliography
  • 14. From Public Involvement to Citizen-based Initiatives: How Can Inhabitants Get Organized to Face Floods?
  • 14.1. Introduction
  • 14.2. The citizen as an actor: an overlooked reality in public policy
  • 14.3. A great number of citizen-led initiatives exist, however
  • 14.5. Conclusion
  • 14.6. Bibliography
  • 15. Crowdsourcing and Crisis-Mapping in the Event of Floods: Tools and Challenges
  • 15.1. Introduction
  • 15.2. What benefits can we expect from these tools?
  • 15.3. How and why did these tools emerge?
  • 15.4. Future challenges and potential breakthroughs
  • 15.5. Weaknesses and limitations of tools
  • 15.6. Conclusion
  • 15.7. Bibliography
  • 16. Flood Crisis Management: The Operational Perspective
  • 16.1. Introduction
  • 16.2. Flooding: direct and indirect consequences for SDIS
  • 16.3. Local risk knowledge
  • 16.4. The development of crisis management regulations in France
  • 16.5. SDIS in the national public protection system
  • 16.6. Operational flood management: adapting to all circumstances
  • 16.7. Assessing and monitoring the risk situation
  • 16.8. Operational implementation of fire and rescue services
  • 16.9. Conclusion
  • 16.10. Acroynyms
  • 17. Local Crisis Management - The Communal Safety Plan: Challenges and Obstacles to Operationality
  • 17.1. Introduction
  • 17.2. General information on local emergency management abroad, and by means of the Communal Safety Plan in France
  • 17.3. The problem of PCS operationality
  • 17.4. PCS implementation put to the test: Villandry during the floods of May 2016
  • 17.5. Conclusion
  • 17.6. Bibliography
  • 18. Anticipating or Coping: Behaviors in the Face of Flash Floods
  • 18.1. Introduction
  • 18.2. Observing behaviors in a flash flood situation: a methodological challenge
  • 18.3. High-risk behavior or bad luck?
  • 18.4. Scrutinizing the interactions between physical and social dynamics
  • 18.5. Conclusion
  • 18.6. Bibliography
  • Part 4: Post-disaster Recovery and Adaptation
  • 19. Disaster Memories and Population Resilience
  • 19.1. Flooding: a historically collective concern
  • 19.2. Trauma and its consequences
  • 19.3. Resiliences
  • 19.4. Conclusion
  • 19.5. Bibliography
  • 20. Economic Resilience, Total Loss Control and Risk Transfer
  • 20.1. What is the optimum for overall risk cost control?
  • 20.2. Role of insurance in funding damage repair and supporting economic resilience
  • 20.3 Comparative analysis of integrated risk transfer systems
  • 20.4. Public/private partnerships for integrated flood risk management
  • 20.5. Conclusion and perspectives
  • 20.6. Bibliography
  • 21. Economic Assessment of Flood Prevention Projects
  • 21.1. The introduction of economic assessment in France
  • 21.2. Economic assessment in France
  • 21.3. Limitations and possible evolutions of economic assessment in France
  • 21.4. Conclusion and perspectives
  • 21.5. Bibliography
  • 22. Flood Debris Management
  • 22.1. Introduction
  • 22.2. Debris proliferates
  • 22.3. Typology, volume, sorting and processing of flood debris
  • 22.4. Health and environmental issues
  • 22.5. Flood debris in planning
  • 22.6. Feedback after Katrina (2005)
  • 22.7. Feedback after Xynthia (2010)
  • 22.8. Conclusion
  • 22.9. Bibliography
  • 23. Post-Flood Recovery: An Opportunity for Disaster Risk Reduction?
  • 23.1. Introduction
  • 23.2. Characterizing the process through analysis of its time frames
  • 23.3. Restructuring governance and rebuilding territories
  • 23.4. Developing the Build Back Better opportunity in the recovery process: anticipating ethical and preventive adaptations
  • 23.5. Conclusion
  • 23.6. Bibliography
  • 24. Towards an Urban Design Adapted to Flood Risk?
  • 24.1. Resilient building in floodplains: architectural and urban forms
  • 24.2. Resilient building in floodplains: what are the specific features in relation to a conventional development project?
  • 24.3. Resilient urban design into the test
  • 24.4. Conclusion
  • 24.5. Bibliography
  • Conclusion: The Challenges of Flood Prevention
  • A threshold in risk reduction?
  • The "war paradigm" is over
  • Technical and cultural aspects
  • The cost of risk and the cost of prevention
  • The positive effects of floods
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • List of Authors
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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