Textbook of Rabbit Medicine E-Book

 
 
Butterworth-Heinemann (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 19. August 2013
  • |
  • 464 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-7020-5419-8 (ISBN)
 

The Textbook of Rabbit Medicine second edition is the completely revised and updated new edition of Frances Harcourt Brown's acclaimed text covering all aspects of rabbit medicine. While the authoritative and evidence-based approach that made the original book so successful has been retained, in this new second edition well-known rabbit expert Molly Varga adds a stronger clinical focus that makes the Textbook invaluable as a point-of-care resource as well as a respected reference. With many additional features introduced for this update, the Textbook of Rabbit Medicine second edition remains the definitive and comprehensive reference of choice for all veterinary practitioners seeking information on the pet rabbit.

  • Comprehensive, in-depth and authoritative coverage of the health and diseases of the domestic rabbit

  • Detailed and explicit line artwork provides a clear understanding of physiological processes

  • A practical, evidence-based resource for the effective treatment of pet rabbits.
  • Entire text reviewed and updated by a leading expert, with major revision of therapeutics, anaesthesia, abscesses and neurology chapters.

  • New clinical emphasis with clinical tips boxes throughout the text increase its practical focus

  • Ancillary website presents clips of key procedures, an image library and podcasts

  • Completely redesigned with more user-friendly text layout and full colour throughout.

  • Many more illustrations specially commissioned for this edition
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • Großbritannien
Illustrations, unspecified
  • Höhe: 246 mm
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  • Breite: 189 mm
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  • Dicke: 0 mm
  • 28,86 MB
978-0-7020-5419-8 (9780702054198)
0702054194 (0702054194)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Textbook of Rabbit Medicine
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Part I: Rabbit Basic Science
  • Chapter 1: Rabbit Basic Science
  • 1.1. Biological characteristics of the domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)
  • 1.1.1. Origins of the domestic rabbit
  • 1.1.2. Wild rabbits
  • 1.1.3. Breeds of rabbits
  • 1.1.4. Angoras
  • 1.1.5. Diurnal rhythms
  • 1.2. Housing and husbandry
  • 1.2.1. Housing
  • 1.2.2. Hutches for pet rabbits
  • 1.2.3. Exercise
  • 1.2.4. Burrowing
  • 1.2.5. Companionship
  • 1.2.6. Winter housing
  • 1.2.7. Free-range rabbits
  • 1.2.8. House rabbits
  • 1.2.9. Litter trays
  • 1.2.10. Thermoregulation
  • 1.3. Digestive anatomy, physiology and nutrition
  • 1.3.1. Digestive physiology
  • 1.3.2. Ingestion of food
  • 1.3.3. Anatomy and digestion in the stomach and small intestine
  • 1.3.4. Anatomy of the hindgut
  • 1.3.5. Motility of the hindgut
  • 1.3.6. Caecal fermentation
  • 1.3.7. Expulsion and ingestion of caecotrophs
  • 1.3.8. Energy metabolism
  • 1.3.9. Water metabolism
  • 1.3.10. Electrolyte exchange
  • 1.3.11. Acid-base balance
  • 1.3.12. Calcium metabolism
  • 1.3.13. Nutrition
  • 1.3.14. Appetite
  • 1.3.15. Dietary requirements of rabbits
  • 1.3.15.1. Carbohydrate
  • 1.3.15.2. Fibre
  • 1.3.15.2.1. Digestible (fermentable) and indigestible fibre in rabbits
  • 1.3.15.2.2. Digestion of fermentable fibre within the caecum
  • 1.3.15.2.3. The importance of indigestible fibre
  • 1.3.15.2.4. Recommended dietary fibre for rabbits
  • 1.3.15.2.5. Sources of fibre for pet rabbits
  • 1.3.15.3. Oligosaccharides
  • 1.3.15.4. Protein
  • 1.3.15.5. Fats
  • 1.3.15.6. Vitamins
  • 1.3.15.6.1. Vitamin A
  • 1.3.15.6.2. Vitamin D
  • 1.3.15.6.3. Vitamin E
  • 1.3.15.6.4. Vitamin K
  • 1.3.15.6.5. B-complex vitamins
  • 1.3.15.6.6. Vitamin C
  • 1.3.15.7. Minerals
  • 1.3.15.7.1. Calcium
  • 1.3.15.7.2. Phosphorus
  • 1.3.15.7.3. Other minerals
  • 1.3.16. Salt licks and mineral blocks
  • 1.3.17. Grass and hay for pet rabbits
  • 1.3.18. Types of commercial rabbit food
  • 1.3.18.1. Pelleted diets
  • 1.3.18.2. Extruded or expanded diets
  • 1.3.18.3. Mixed rations
  • 1.3.19. Problems associated with feeding
  • 1.3.19.1. Toxic plants
  • 1.3.19.2. Chemicals
  • 1.3.19.3. Mycotoxins
  • 1.3.19.4. Locust beans and dried pulses
  • 1.3.20. Obesity
  • 1.4. Taking a clinical history
  • 1.4.1. Clinical history
  • 1.4.2. Breed incidence
  • 1.4.3. Age
  • 1.4.4. Husbandry
  • 1.4.5. Eating and drinking
  • 1.4.6. Urination and defecation
  • 1.5. Handling
  • 1.5.1. Handling rabbits during the consultation
  • 1.5.2. Immobility response (tonic immobility, freeze response or `hypnosis´)
  • 1.6. External characteristics and physical examination
  • 1.6.1. External characteristics
  • 1.6.2. Clinical examination
  • 1.6.2.1. General condition
  • 1.6.2.2. General demeanour
  • 1.6.2.3. Gait
  • 1.6.2.4. Sex, age and sexual maturity
  • 1.6.2.5. Examination of the skin, fur and mucous membranes
  • 1.6.2.6. Examination of the perineum
  • 1.6.2.7. Rectal temperature
  • 1.6.2.8. Abdominal palpation and auscultation
  • 1.6.2.9. Auscultation and assessment of respiration
  • 1.6.2.10. Examination of the face, head and oral cavity
  • 1.6.2.11. Examination of the eyes
  • 1.7. Reproduction and neutering
  • 1.7.1. Oestrus cycle
  • 1.7.2. Mating and gestation
  • 1.7.3. Parturition
  • 1.7.4. Lactation and maternal care
  • 1.7.5. Rearing orphans
  • 1.7.6. Pseudopregnancy
  • 1.7.7. Advice on neutering
  • 1.7.8. Leg rings
  • 1.8. Vaccination and preventive medicine
  • 1.8.1. Vaccination
  • 1.8.1.1. Myxomatosis vaccination
  • 1.8.1.2. Viral haemorrhagic disease
  • 1.8.1.3. Simultaneous administration of myxomatosis and VHD vaccine
  • 1.8.1.4. Combined myxomatosis and VHD vaccine
  • 1.8.2. Health risks from keeping rabbits
  • 1.9. Stress
  • 1.9.1. Stress
  • 1.9.2. Behaviour problems and aggression
  • 1.10. Hospitalization and clinical techniques
  • 1.10.1. Hospitalization of rabbits
  • 1.10.2. Euthanasia
  • 1.10.3. Clinical techniques
  • 1.10.3.1. Chemical restraint
  • 1.10.3.2. Blood sampling
  • 1.10.3.3. Urine collection
  • 1.10.4. Administration of medication
  • 1.10.4.1. Subcutaneous injections
  • 1.10.4.2. Intramuscular injections
  • 1.10.4.3. Intravenous injections
  • 1.10.4.4. Intraosseous route
  • 1.10.4.5. Intraperitoneal route
  • 1.10.4.6. Oral administration
  • 1.10.5. Nutritional support
  • 1.10.5.1. Nasogastric tubes
  • 1.10.5.2. Stomach tubes
  • 1.10.5.3. Pharyngotomy and gastrotomy tubes
  • 1.10.6. Elizabethan collars
  • 1.10.7. Nebulization
  • 1.10.8. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection and myelography
  • References
  • Part II: Rabbit Medicine
  • Chapter 2: Clinical Pathology
  • 2.1. Haematology and biochemistry
  • 2.1.1. Sample collection
  • 2.1.2. Fasting and other physiological considerations
  • 2.1.3. Reference ranges
  • 2.2. Haematology
  • 2.2.1. Morphological characteristics of blood cells
  • 2.2.2. Interpretation of haematology results
  • 2.2.3. Red cell parameters
  • 2.2.4. White blood cells
  • 2.2.4.1. Total white blood cell count
  • 2.2.4.2. Differential white cell counts
  • 2.2.4.3. Effect of stress on the differential white cell count
  • 2.2.4.4. Neutrophils
  • 2.2.4.5. Lymphocytes
  • 2.2.4.6. Eosinophils
  • 2.2.4.7. Basophils
  • 2.2.4.8. Monocytes
  • 2.3. Biochemistry
  • 2.3.1. Glucose
  • 2.3.2. Total protein
  • 2.3.3. Albumin
  • 2.3.4. Globulin
  • 2.3.5. Cholesterol and triglycerides
  • 2.3.6. Amylase
  • 2.3.7. Bilirubin
  • 2.3.8. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)
  • 2.3.9. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST)
  • 2.3.10. ?-Glutamyl transferase (GGT)
  • 2.3.11. Alkaline phosphatase (AP)
  • 2.3.12. Bile acids
  • 2.3.13. Urea
  • 2.3.14. Creatinine
  • 2.3.15. Electrolytes
  • 2.3.15.1. Sodium
  • 2.3.15.2. Potassium
  • 2.3.15.3. Calcium
  • 2.3.15.4. Phosphate
  • 2.4. Miscellaneous assays
  • 2.4.1. Lead estimation
  • 2.4.2. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)
  • 2.4.3. Serology
  • 2.5. Urine examination
  • 2.6. Faeces examination
  • 2.7. Laboratory examination of hair
  • 2.8. Cerebrospinal fluid
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Therapeutics
  • 3.1. Special considerations when prescribing for rabbits
  • 3.1.1. Digestive physiology
  • 3.1.2. Microflora of caecum and digestive tract
  • 3.1.3. Antibiotic toxicity in rabbits
  • 3.1.3.1. Prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and enterotoxaemia
  • 3.1.4. Legislation
  • 3.2. Veterinary medicines that are used in rabbits
  • 3.2.1. Antibiotics
  • 3.2.1.1. Ampicillin
  • 3.2.1.2. Cephalosporins
  • 3.2.1.2.1. Cefalexin
  • 3.2.1.2.2. Ceftazidime
  • 3.2.1.3. Lincosamides (clindamycin and lincomycin)
  • 3.2.1.3.1. Clindamycin
  • 3.2.1.4. Fluoroquinolones
  • 3.2.1.4.1. Enrofloxacin
  • 3.2.1.4.2. Marbofloxacin
  • 3.2.1.4.3. Orbifloxacin
  • 3.2.1.5. Fusidic acid
  • 3.2.1.6. Aminoglycosides
  • 3.2.1.6.1. Gentamicin
  • 3.2.1.6.2. Amikacin
  • 3.2.1.7. Metronidazole
  • 3.2.1.8. Penicillin
  • 3.2.1.9. Potentiated sulphonamides
  • 3.2.1.10. Tetracyclines
  • 3.2.1.11. Macrolide antibiotics
  • 3.2.1.11.1. Tylosin
  • 3.2.1.11.2. Azithromycin
  • 3.2.1.11.3. Erythromycin
  • 3.2.1.12. Vancomycin
  • 3.3. Probiotics
  • 3.4. Corticosteroids
  • 3.5. Anabolic steroids
  • 3.6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • 3.6.1. Acetylsalicylic acid
  • 3.6.2. Carprofen
  • 3.6.3. Flunixin
  • 3.6.4. Ketoprofen
  • 3.6.5. Meloxicam
  • 3.6.6. Paracetamol
  • 3.7. Prokinetic drugs
  • 3.7.1. Cisapride
  • 3.7.2. Metoclopramide
  • 3.7.3. H2-receptor antagonists
  • 3.7.4. Ranitidine
  • 3.7.5. Domperidone
  • 3.8. Parasiticides
  • 3.8.1. Albendazole
  • 3.8.2. Fenbendazole
  • 3.8.3. Avermectins
  • 3.8.3.1. Ivermectin
  • 3.8.3.2. Selamectin
  • 3.8.3.3. Moxidectin
  • 3.8.4. Fipronil
  • 3.8.5. Imidacloprid
  • 3.9. Miscellaneous preparations
  • 3.9.1. Buserelin
  • 3.9.2. Cholestyramine
  • 3.9.3. Anti-ulcer drugs
  • 3.9.3.1. Omeprazole
  • 3.9.4. Chelating agents
  • 3.9.4.1. Sodium calcium edetate
  • 3.9.4.2. Penicillamine
  • 3.9.5. Drugs used to prevent adhesion formation
  • 3.9.5.1. Verapamil
  • 3.9.5.2. Diltiazem
  • 3.9.5.3. Pentoxifylline
  • 3.9.5.4. Nimesulide
  • 3.9.5.5. Celecoxib
  • 3.9.5.6. Non-selective NSAIDs
  • 3.9.5.7. Melatonin
  • 3.9.5.8. Surfactants, hydrolytic enzymes and anti-adhesive polypeptides
  • 3.9.6. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
  • 3.10. Topical preparations
  • 3.10.1. `EMLA´ cream
  • 3.11. Fluid therapy
  • 3.11.1. Choice of fluid therapy for rabbits
  • 3.11.2. Blood transfusion
  • 3.11.3. Route of delivery
  • 3.12. Cardiac drugs
  • 3.12.1. Diuretics
  • 3.12.1.1. Furosemide
  • 3.12.2. ACE inhibitors
  • 3.12.2.1. Enalapril
  • 3.12.2.2. Benazepril
  • 3.12.2.3. Pimobendan
  • 3.12.2.4. Nebulization
  • 3.13. Respiratory drugs
  • 3.13.1. Theophylline
  • 3.13.2. Bromhexine
  • 3.14. Urinary tract drugs
  • 3.14.1. Phenylpropanolamine
  • 3.14.2. Estriol
  • 3.15. Drugs used in peripheral or central vestibular disease
  • 3.15.1. Prochlorperazine
  • 3.15.2. Diphenhydramine
  • 3.15.3. Meclizine
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Anaesthesia and Analgesia
  • 4.1. Challenges encountered when anaesthetizing rabbits
  • 4.2. Reducing anaesthetic risk in rabbits
  • 4.3. Anaesthetic equipment
  • 4.4. Drugs, analgesics and anaesthetic agents used in rabbit anaesthesia
  • 4.4.1. Controlled drugs
  • 4.4.2. Atropine and glycopyrrolate
  • 4.4.3. `EMLA´ cream
  • 4.4.4. Phenothiazine derivatives: acepromazine
  • 4.4.5. Benzodiazepines: diazepam and midazolam
  • 4.4.6. a2-Adrenergic agonists
  • 4.4.6.1. Xylazine
  • 4.4.6.2. Medetomidine
  • 4.4.6.3. Dexmedetomidine
  • 4.4.6.4. Etomidate
  • 4.4.7. Analgesics
  • 4.4.7.1. Narcotic analgesics
  • 4.4.7.2. Buprenorphine (Schedule 3)
  • 4.4.7.3. Butorphanol
  • 4.4.7.4. Fentanyl
  • 4.4.7.5. Fentanyl/fluanisone (Hypnorm, Janssen) (Schedule 2)
  • 4.4.7.6. Pethidine
  • 4.4.8. Drugs used to counteract effects of narcotic analgesics
  • 4.4.8.1. Doxapram
  • 4.4.8.2. Naloxone
  • 4.4.9. Injectable induction agents
  • 4.4.9.1. Alfaxalone
  • 4.4.9.2. Propofol
  • 4.4.9.3. Ketamine
  • 4.4.10. Inhalational anaesthetic agents
  • 4.4.10.1. Isoflurane
  • 4.4.10.2. Sevoflurane
  • 4.4.10.3. Halothane
  • 4.4.10.4. Nitrous oxide
  • 4.5. Maintenance of anaesthesia
  • 4.5.1. Endotracheal intubation
  • 4.5.1.1. Blind intubation
  • 4.5.1.2. Intubation by visualizing the larynx
  • 4.5.2. Supraglottic airway devices
  • 4.5.3. Nasal intubation
  • 4.6. Monitoring anaesthesia
  • 4.7. Postoperative care
  • 4.7.1. Recovery from anaesthesia
  • 4.7.2. Pain assessment
  • 4.7.3. Choice of postoperative analgesic
  • 4.7.4. Local anaesthesia and regional nerve blocks
  • 4.7.5. Other postoperative pain-relieving factors
  • 4.7.6. Instructions to owners
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Dental Disease
  • 5.1. Dental anatomy of the domestic rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus
  • 5.2. Mastication
  • 5.3. Factors that affect tooth shape in rabbits
  • 5.4. Dental disorders of pet rabbits
  • 5.5. Acquired dental disease in pet rabbits
  • 5.5.1. Causes of acquired dental disease in pet rabbits
  • 5.5.1.1. Metabolic bone disease as a cause of dental disease in rabbits
  • 5.5.1.2. Diet and dental wear
  • 5.5.1.3. Other causes of acquired dental disease
  • 5.6. Clinical conditions associated with dental problems in rabbits
  • 5.6.1. Lack of grooming
  • 5.6.2. Digestive disorders
  • 5.6.3. Uneaten caecotrophs
  • 5.6.4. Ribbed teeth
  • 5.6.5. Epiphora and dacrocystitis
  • 5.6.6. Abscesses
  • 5.6.7. Incisor malocclusion
  • 5.6.8. Malocclusion of the cheek teeth
  • 5.6.9. Pain and anorexia
  • 5.7. Examination of the teeth
  • 5.8. Radiography
  • 5.8.1. Positioning for radiography
  • 5.8.2. Contrast studies
  • 5.8.3. Computed tomography
  • 5.8.4. Interpretation of skull radiographs
  • 5.9. Radiographic progression of acquired dental disease
  • 5.10. Treatment of dental disorders of rabbits
  • 5.10.1. Incisor elongation and malocclusion
  • 5.10.1.1. Surgical removal of the incisors
  • 5.10.1.2. Surgical technique for incisor removal
  • 5.10.2. Trimming cheek teeth
  • 5.10.3. Extraction of cheek teeth
  • 5.11. Dietary advice for rabbits with dental disease
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Abscesses
  • 6.1. Causes of abscesses in pet rabbits
  • 6.2. Diagnosis of abscesses in rabbits
  • 6.2.1. Radiology
  • 6.2.2. Bacteriology
  • 6.3. Treatment of abscesses
  • 6.3.1. Surgical exploration or removal of abscesses
  • 6.3.2. Topical treatment
  • 6.3.3. Antibacterial therapy
  • 6.3.4. Antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads
  • 6.3.4.1. Use of antibiotic-impregnated beads in veterinary medicine
  • 6.3.4.2. Manufacturing antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads
  • 6.3.4.3. Antibiotic-impregnated plaster of Paris beads
  • 6.3.4.4. Choice of antibiotic for impregnated beads in rabbits
  • 6.3.4.5. Implantation of antibiotic-impregnated beads
  • 6.3.5. Calcium hydroxide
  • 6.4. Prognosis for facial abscesses in rabbits
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Skin Diseases
  • 7.1. Underlying causes of skin disease in rabbits
  • 7.2. Examination of the skin
  • 7.3. Grooming and dematting rabbits
  • 7.4. Moulting
  • 7.5. Alopecia
  • 7.6. Injection reactions
  • 7.7. Dermatitis and bacterial skin disease
  • 7.7.1. Moist dermatitis of the dewlap
  • 7.7.2. Facial dermatitis
  • 7.7.3. Perineal dermatitis
  • 7.7.3.1. Perineal dermoplasty
  • 7.8. Fly strike (myiasis)
  • 7.9. Otitis externa
  • 7.10. Ulcerative pododermatitis
  • 7.10.1. Predisposing factors of ulcerative pododermatitis in rabbits
  • 7.10.2. Pathogenesis of pododermatitis
  • 7.10.3. Treatment of ulcerative pododermatitis
  • 7.11. Contact dermatitis
  • 7.12. Self-mutilation
  • 7.13. Treponematosis or `rabbit syphilis´
  • 7.14. Parasitic skin disease
  • 7.14.1. Ticks
  • 7.14.2. Fleas
  • 7.14.3. Mite infestations
  • 7.14.3.1. Ear mites
  • 7.14.3.2. Fur mites
  • 7.14.3.3. Cheyletiella parasitovorax
  • 7.14.3.4. Leporacarus gibbus
  • 7.14.3.5. Demodex cuniculi
  • 7.14.3.6. Sarcoptic mange
  • 7.14.3.7. Psorergatid mites
  • 7.14.3.8. Harvest mites
  • 7.14.4. Lice
  • 7.14.5. Tapeworm cysts
  • 7.15. Ringworm
  • 7.16. Skin nodules
  • 7.17. Papillomas
  • 7.18. Diseases of the mammary gland
  • 7.19. Connective tissue disease
  • 7.20. Sebaceous adenitis
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Digestive Disorders
  • 8.1. Digestive physiology
  • 8.2. Inter-relating factors in digestive disease
  • 8.2.1. Intestinal microflora
  • 8.2.2. Diet
  • 8.2.3. Age and husbandry considerations
  • 8.2.4. Effect of digestive disease on water and electrolyte exchange
  • 8.3. Gastrointestinal hypomotility
  • 8.3.1. Gastrointestinal hypomotility and formation of trichobezoars (hairballs)
  • 8.3.2. Anorexia and development of hepatic lipidosis
  • 8.3.3. Obesity, pregnancy toxaemia and hepatic lipidosis
  • 8.3.4. Diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hypomotility and prevention of hepatic lipidosis
  • 8.4. Gastric ulceration
  • 8.5. Gastric dilatation and intestinal obstruction
  • 8.5.1. Surgical removal of intestinal foreign bodies
  • 8.6. Disorders of caecotrophy
  • 8.6.1. Normal caecotrophy
  • 8.6.2. Differentiation between uneaten caecotrophs and diarrhoea
  • 8.6.3. Physical conditions that interfere with caecotrophy
  • 8.6.4. Consistency of caecotrophs
  • 8.7. Caecal impaction
  • 8.8. Dysautonomia
  • 8.9. Mucoid enteropathy
  • 8.10. Enteric diseases caused by specific pathogens
  • 8.10.1. Coccidiosis
  • 8.10.1.1. Intestinal coccidiosis
  • 8.10.1.2. Hepatic coccidiosis
  • 8.10.1.3. Coccidiosis in pet rabbits
  • 8.10.2. Clostridial enterotoxaemia
  • 8.10.3. Coliform enteritis
  • 8.10.4. Tyzzer´s disease
  • 8.10.5. Salmonellosis
  • 8.10.6. Viral causes of enteritis
  • 8.10.6.1. Rotavirus
  • 8.10.6.2. Coronavirus
  • 8.11. Poisoning
  • 8.11.1. Plant toxicity
  • 8.11.2. Lead poisoning
  • 8.11.3. Liver disease
  • 8.11.4. Liver lobe torsion
  • 8.12. Approach to an outbreak of enteric disease in a breeding colony
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Ophthalmic Diseases
  • 9.1. Ocular anatomy and physiology
  • 9.1.1. The glands of the eye
  • 9.1.2. Nasolacrimal system
  • 9.2. Conjunctival flora
  • 9.3. Examination of the eye
  • 9.4. Relationship between dental disease and ophthalmic conditions of pet rabbits
  • 9.5. Congenital ocular conditions
  • 9.5.1. Buphthalmia
  • 9.5.2. Congenital eyelid disorders
  • 9.5.3. Conjunctival hyperplasia
  • 9.6. Diseases of the eyelids and conjunctiva
  • 9.6.1. Prolapse of the deep gland of the third eyelid
  • 9.6.2. Conjunctivitis
  • 9.6.2.1. Treatment of conjunctivitis
  • 9.6.3. Epiphora
  • 9.6.4. Dacryocystitis
  • 9.6.4.1. Irrigation of the nasolacrimal duct
  • 9.7. Diseases of the globe
  • 9.7.1. Keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis and corneal ulceration
  • 9.7.2. Corneal opacities
  • 9.7.3. Uveitis
  • 9.7.3.1. Encephalitozoon cuniculi uveitis
  • 9.7.4. Cataracts
  • 9.8. Lymphoma
  • 9.9. Enucleation of the eye of a rabbit
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Neurological and Locomotor Disorders
  • 10.1. Investigation of neurological and locomotor disorders
  • 10.2. Lameness
  • 10.2.1. Orthopaedic surgery
  • 10.2.2. Amputation
  • 10.3. Neurological diseases
  • 10.4. Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 10.4.1. Central nervous system (CNS) signs attributed to Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 10.4.2. Vestibular disease
  • 10.4.3. Differentiation between pasteurellosis and encephalitozoonosis
  • 10.4.4. Prognosis and treatment of rabbits with vestibular disease
  • 10.4.4.1. Corticosteroids
  • 10.4.4.2. Antibiotics
  • 10.4.4.3. Symptomatic treatment
  • 10.4.4.4. Bulla osteotomy
  • 10.5. Seizures
  • 10.6. Generalized muscular weakness in rabbits
  • 10.6.1. Possible causes of generalized muscular weakness in rabbits
  • 10.6.1.1. Hypokalaemia
  • 10.6.1.2. Toxins
  • 10.6.1.3. Splay leg
  • 10.6.1.4. Nutritional muscular dystrophy
  • 10.7. Spinal disorders
  • 10.7.1. Anatomy of the spinal cord
  • 10.7.2. Clinical signs associated with spinal disease in pet rabbits
  • 10.7.3. Causes of spinal disease
  • 10.7.4. Treatment of spinal disease in rabbits
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Cardiorespiratory Disease
  • 11.1. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
  • 11.2. Respiratory diseases
  • 11.2.1. Pasteurellosis
  • 11.2.2. Respiratory disease due to pasteurellosis
  • 11.2.3. Rhinitis (`snuffles´)
  • 11.2.3.1. Differential diagnosis of rhinitis
  • 11.2.4. Otitis media
  • 11.2.5. Pneumonia
  • 11.2.6. Treatment of pasteurellosis
  • 11.2.7. Other infectious causes of respiratory disease
  • 11.2.7.1. Fungal
  • 11.3. Nasal foreign bodies
  • 11.3.1. Endoscopic examination of the nasal passages
  • 11.4. Dyspnoea
  • 11.5. Heat stroke
  • 11.6. Cardiovascular disease
  • 11.6.1. Cardiomyopathy
  • 11.6.2. Arteriosclerosis
  • 11.6.3. Coronavirus
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Urogenital Diseases
  • 12.1. Anatomy of the urogenital tract
  • 12.2. Renal function in rabbits
  • 12.2.1. Renal response to acid-base disturbances
  • 12.2.2. Stress and renal blood flow
  • 12.2.3. Calcium excretion
  • 12.3. Urine examination
  • 12.4. Lower urinary tract disease
  • 12.4.1. The role of hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria in urinary tract disease in rabbits
  • 12.4.2. `Sludgy urine´
  • 12.4.3. Urinary incontinence and urine scalding of the perineal skin
  • 12.4.4. Treatment of lower urinary tract disorders such as `sludgy urine´ and urine scalding
  • 12.4.4.1. Surgical procedures for rabbits with lower urinary tract disease
  • 12.4.5. Urolithiasis
  • 12.5. Renal disease
  • 12.5.1. Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 12.5.2. Calcification of the kidney
  • 12.5.3. Renal failure
  • 12.5.3.1. Acute renal failure
  • 12.5.3.2. Chronic renal failure
  • 12.6. Reproductive disease
  • 12.6.1. Obstetrics
  • 12.6.2. Caesarean section
  • 12.6.3. Pseudopregnancy
  • 12.6.4. Extrauterine pregnancy
  • 12.6.5. Bladder eversion
  • 12.6.6. Diseases of the uterus
  • 12.6.6.1. Uterine adenocarcinoma
  • References
  • Chapter 13: General Surgical Principles and Neutering
  • 13.1. Skin preparation
  • 13.2. Surgical considerations
  • 13.3. Suture techniques and materials
  • 13.4. Abdominal incisions
  • 13.5. Skin sutures
  • 13.6. Repair of hollow abdominal organs
  • 13.7. Neutering
  • 13.7.1. Ovariohysterectomy
  • 13.7.2. Castration
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Infectious Diseases of Domestic Rabbits
  • Introduction
  • 14.1. Parasites of rabbits
  • 14.2. Ectoparasites
  • 14.2.1. Fleas
  • 14.2.2. Lice
  • 14.2.3. Mites
  • 14.2.4. Warble flies
  • 14.3. Endoparasites
  • 14.3.1. Intestinal worms
  • 14.3.2. Tapeworms
  • 14.4. Protozoa
  • 14.4.1. Coccidiosis
  • 14.4.2. Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 14.4.2.1. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in other species
  • 14.4.2.2. Zoonotic potential of Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 14.4.2.3. Clinical signs associated with Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection in rabbits
  • 14.4.2.4. Diagnosis of Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • 14.4.2.5. Treatment of encephalitozoonosis
  • 14.4.2.6. Control and prevention of encephalitozoonosis
  • 14.4.3. Toxoplasma gondii
  • 14.4.4. Other protozoan parasites of rabbits
  • 14.5. Bacterial diseases
  • 14.5.1. Pasteurellosis
  • 14.5.1.1. Epidemiology
  • 14.5.1.2. Clinical signs of pasteurellosis
  • 14.5.1.3. Rhinitis (`snuffles´)
  • 14.5.1.4. Pneumonia
  • 14.5.1.5. Genital infection
  • 14.5.1.6. Wound infections and abscesses
  • 14.5.1.7. Dacryocystitis
  • 14.5.1.8. Otitis media
  • 14.5.1.9. Detection of pasteurellosis
  • 14.5.1.10. Control of pasteurellosis in rabbit colonies
  • 14.5.1.11. Prevention of pasteurellosis
  • 14.5.1.12. Treatment of pasteurellosis
  • 14.5.2. Staphylococcus aureus
  • 14.5.3. Bordetella bronchiseptica
  • 14.5.4. Tyzzer´s disease
  • 14.5.5. Salmonellosis
  • 14.5.6. Escherichia coli
  • 14.5.7. Clostridial enterotoxaemia
  • 14.5.8. Other causes of bacterial enteritis
  • 14.5.9. Treponematosis
  • 14.5.10. Listeriosis
  • 14.5.11. Paratuberculosis (Johne´s disease)
  • 14.5.12. Pseudotuberculosis
  • 14.5.13. Tularaemia
  • 14.5.14. Lyme disease
  • 14.6. Viral diseases
  • 14.6.1. Myxomatosis
  • 14.6.1.1. History of myxomatosis
  • 14.6.1.2. Epidemiology of myxomatosis
  • 14.6.1.3. Clinical signs of myxomatosis
  • 14.6.1.4. Relationship of myxomatosis with Shope fibroma virus
  • 14.6.1.5. Immunization
  • 14.6.1.6. Recovery from myxomatosis
  • 14.6.2. Viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD)
  • 14.6.2.1. Pathogenesis of VHD
  • 14.6.2.2. Epidemiology of VHD
  • 14.6.2.3. Clinical signs of viral haemorrhagic disease
  • 14.6.2.4. Diagnosis of VHD
  • 14.6.2.5. Vaccination
  • 14.6.3. Papillomatosis
  • 14.6.4. Coronavirus
  • 14.7. Mycotic infections
  • 14.7.1. Dermatophytosis
  • 14.7.2. Aspergillosis
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Post-mortem Examination of Rabbits
  • 15.1. Preparation of post-mortem tissue for further examination
  • 15.2. Examination for parasites
  • 15.3. Examination of autonomic ganglia
  • 15.4. Examination of the head and brain
  • 15.5. Examination of the vertebral column
  • 15.6. Preparation of the skull and other bones
  • References
  • Index

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