Fast and Effective Embedded Systems Design

Applying the ARM mbed
 
 
Newnes (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 8. Oktober 2016
  • |
  • 510 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100903-1 (ISBN)
 

Fast and Effective Embedded Systems Design is a fast-moving introduction to embedded systems design, applying the innovative ARM mbed and its web-based development environment. Each chapter introduces a major topic in embedded systems, and proceeds as a series of practical experiments, adopting a 'learning through doing' strategy. Minimal background knowledge is needed to start. C/C++ programming is applied, with a step-by-step approach which allows you to get coding quickly. Once the basics are covered, the book progresses to some 'hot' embedded issues - intelligent instrumentation, wireless and networked systems, digital audio and digital signal processing. In this new edition all examples and peripheral devices are updated to use the most recent libraries and peripheral devices, with increased technical depth, and introduction of the 'mbed enabled' concept.

Written by two experts in the field, this book reflects on the experimental results, develops and matches theory to practice, evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the technology and techniques introduced, and considers applications in a wider context.

New Chapters on:

  • Bluetooth and ZigBee communication
  • Internet communication and control, setting the scene for the 'Internet of Things'
  • Digital Audio, with high-fidelity applications and use of the I2S bus
  • Power supply, and very low power applications
  • The development process of moving from prototyping to small-scale or mass manufacture, with a commercial case study.

  • Updates all examples and peripheral devices to use the most recent libraries and peripheral products
  • Includes examples with touch screen displays and includes high definition audio input/output with the I2S interface
  • Covers the development process of moving from prototyping to small-scale or mass manufacture with commercial case studies
  • Covers hot embedded issues such as intelligent instrumentation, networked systems, closed loop control, and digital signal processing


Rob Toulson is Professor of Creative Industries at the University of Westminster. He holds a PhD in the field of digital signal processing (awarded by Anglia Ruskin University in 2004) and a first degree in Mechanical Engineering from Loughborough University (1999). Rob has a number of year's industrial experience in digital signal analysis, control systems design, rapid prototyping, and model based design, as well as commercial experience in sound engineering and music production. His main focus is now in developing collaborative research between the technical and creative industries.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
Elsevier Science
  • 11,78 MB
978-0-08-100903-1 (9780081009031)
0081009038 (0081009038)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Fast and Effective Embedded Systems Design
  • Companion Website
  • Fast and Effective Embedded Systems Design: Applying the ARM mbed
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • I - Essentials of Embedded Systems, Using the mbed
  • 1 - Embedded Systems, Microcontrollers, and ARM
  • 1.1 Introducing Embedded Systems
  • 1.1.1 What Is an Embedded System?
  • 1.1.2 An Example Embedded System
  • 1.1.3 A Second Example System: A Word on Control Systems and the Segway
  • 1.2 Microprocessors and Microcontrollers
  • 1.2.1 Some Computer Essentials
  • 1.2.2 The Microcontroller
  • 1.3 Development Processes for Embedded Systems
  • 1.3.1 Programming Languages-What's So Special About C/C++?
  • 1.3.2 The Development Cycle
  • 1.4 The World of ARM
  • 1.4.1 A Little History
  • 1.4.2 Some Technical Detail-What Does This RISC Word Mean?
  • 1.4.3 The Cortex Core
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 2 - Introducing the mbed
  • 2.1 Introducing the mbed
  • 2.1.1 mbed and mbed-enabled
  • 2.1.2 The mbed LPC1768
  • 2.1.3 The mbed LPC1768 Architecture
  • 2.1.4 The LPC1768 Microcontroller
  • 2.2 Getting Started With the mbed: A Tutorial
  • Step 1. Connecting the mbed to the PC
  • Step 2. Creating an mbed Account
  • Step 3. Running a Program
  • Step 4. Compiling the Program
  • Step 5. Downloading the Program Binary Code
  • Step 6. Modifying the Program Code
  • 2.3 The Development Environment
  • 2.3.1 The mbed Software Development Kit and API
  • 2.3.2 Using C/C++
  • 2.3.3 The mbed Application Board
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 3 - Digital Input and Output
  • 3.1 Starting to Program
  • 3.1.1 Thinking About the First Program
  • 3.1.2 Using the mbed API
  • 3.1.3 Exploring the while Loop
  • 3.2 Voltages as Logic Values
  • 3.3 Digital Output on the mbed
  • 3.3.1 Using Light Emitting Diodes
  • 3.3.2 Using mbed External Pins
  • 3.4 Using Digital Inputs
  • 3.4.1 Connecting Switches to a Digital System
  • 3.4.2 The DigitalIn API
  • 3.4.3 Using if to Respond to a Switch Input
  • 3.5 Digital Input and Output With the Application Board
  • 3.6 Interfacing Simple Optodevices
  • 3.6.1 Optoreflective and Transmissive Sensors
  • 3.6.2 Connecting an Optosensor to the mbed
  • 3.6.3 Seven-Segment Displays
  • 3.6.4 Connecting a Seven-Segment Display to the mbed
  • 3.7 Switching Larger DC Loads
  • 3.7.1 Applying Transistor Switching
  • 3.7.2 Switching a Motor With the mbed
  • 3.7.3 Switching Multiple Seven-Segment Displays
  • 3.8 Mini Project: Letter Counter
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 4 - Analog Output
  • 4.1 Introducing Data Conversion
  • 4.1.1 The DAC
  • 4.2 Analog Outputs on the mbed
  • 4.2.1 Creating Constant Output Voltages
  • 4.2.2 Saw Tooth Waveforms
  • 4.2.3 Testing the DAC Resolution
  • 4.2.4 Generating a Sine Wave
  • 4.3 Another Form of Analog Output: Pulse Width Modulation
  • 4.4 Pulse Width Modulation on the mbed
  • 4.4.1 Using the mbed Pulse Width Modulation Sources
  • 4.4.2 Some Trial Pulse Width Modulation Outputs
  • 4.4.3 Speed Control of a Small Motor
  • 4.4.4 Generating Pulse Width Modulation in Software
  • 4.4.5 Servo Control
  • 4.4.6 Producing Audio Output
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 5 - Analog Input
  • 5.1 Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC)
  • 5.1.1 The ADC
  • 5.1.2 Range, Resolution, and Quantization
  • 5.1.3 Sampling Frequency
  • 5.1.4 Analog Input With the mbed
  • 5.2 Combining Analog Input and Output
  • 5.2.1 Controlling LED Brightness by Variable Voltage
  • 5.2.2 Controlling LED Brightness by PWM
  • 5.2.3 Controlling PWM Frequency
  • 5.3 Processing Data From Analog Inputs
  • 5.3.1 Displaying Values on the Computer Screen
  • 5.3.2 Scaling ADC Outputs to Recognized Units
  • 5.3.3 Applying Averaging to Reduce Noise
  • 5.4 Some Simple Analog Sensors
  • 5.4.1 The Light-Dependent Resistor
  • 5.4.2 Integrated Circuit Temperature Sensor
  • 5.5 Exploring Data Conversion Timing
  • 5.5.1 Estimating Conversion Time and Applying Nyquist
  • 5.6 Mini Projects
  • 5.6.1 Two-Dimensional Light Tracking
  • 5.6.2 Temperature Alarm
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 6 - Further Programming Techniques
  • 6.1 The Benefits of Considered Program Design and Structure
  • 6.2 Functions
  • 6.3 Program Design
  • 6.3.1 Using Flow Charts to Define Code Structure
  • 6.3.2 Pseudocode
  • 6.4 Working With Functions on the mbed
  • 6.4.1 Implementing a Seven-Segment Display Counter
  • 6.4.2 Function Reuse
  • 6.4.3 A More Complex Program Using Functions
  • 6.5 Using Multiple Files in C/C++
  • 6.5.1 Summary of the C/C++ Program Compilation Process
  • 6.5.2 Using #define, #include, #ifndef, and #endif Directives
  • 6.5.3 Using mbed Objects Globally
  • 6.6 Modular Program Example
  • 6.7 Working With Bespoke Libraries
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 7 - Starting with Serial Communication
  • 7.1 Introducing Synchronous Serial Communication
  • 7.2 SPI
  • 7.2.1 Introducing SPI
  • 7.2.2 SPI on the mbed and Application Board
  • 7.2.3 Setting Up an mbed SPI Master
  • 7.2.4 Creating a SPI Data Link
  • 7.3 Intelligent Instrumentation
  • 7.3.1 Introducing the SPI-Linked ADXL345 Accelerometer
  • 7.3.2 Developing a Simple ADXL345 Program
  • 7.4 Evaluating SPI
  • 7.5 The I2C Bus
  • 7.5.1 Introducing the I2C Bus
  • 7.5.2 I2C on the mbed
  • 7.5.3 Setting Up an I2C Data Link
  • 7.6 Communicating With I2C-Enabled Sensors
  • 7.6.1 The TMP102 Sensor
  • 7.6.2 The SRF08 Ultrasonic Range Finder
  • 7.7 Evaluating I2C
  • 7.8 Asynchronous Serial Data Communication
  • 7.8.1 Introducing Asynchronous Serial Data
  • 7.8.2 Applying Asynchronous Communication on the mbed
  • 7.8.3 Applying Asynchronous Communication With the Host Computer
  • 7.9 USB
  • 7.9.1 Introducing USB
  • 7.9.2 USB Capability on the mbed
  • 7.9.3 Using the mbed to Emulate a USB Mouse
  • 7.9.4 Leaving USB for Now
  • 7.10 Mini Project: Multinode I2C Bus
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 8 - Liquid Crystal Displays
  • 8.1 Display Technologies
  • 8.1.1 Introducing Liquid Crystal Technology
  • 8.1.2 Liquid Crystal Character Displays
  • 8.2 Using the PC1602F LCD
  • 8.2.1 Introducing the PC1602F Display
  • 8.2.2 Connecting the PC1602F to the mbed
  • 8.2.3 Using Modular Coding to Interface the LCD
  • 8.2.4 Initializing the Display
  • Function mode
  • Display mode
  • Clear display
  • 8.2.5 Sending Display Data to the LCD
  • 8.2.6 The Complete LCD.cpp Definition
  • 8.2.7 Using the LCD Functions
  • 8.2.8 Adding Data to a Specified Location
  • 8.3 Using the mbed TextLCD Library
  • 8.4 Displaying Analog Input Data on the LCD
  • 8.5 Pixel Graphics-Implementing the NHD-C12832 Display
  • 8.6 Color LCDs-Interfacing the uLCD-144-G2
  • 8.7 Mini Project: Digital Spirit Level
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 9 - Interrupts, Timers, and Tasks
  • 9.1 Time and Tasks in Embedded Systems
  • 9.1.1 Timers and Interrupts
  • 9.1.2 Tasks
  • 9.1.3 Event-Triggered and Time-Triggered Tasks
  • 9.1.4 Working in "Real Time"
  • 9.2 Responding to External Events
  • 9.2.1 Polling
  • 9.2.2 Introducing Interrupts
  • 9.3 Simple Interrupts on the mbed
  • 9.4 Getting Deeper Into Interrupts
  • 9.4.1 Interrupts on the LPC1768
  • 9.4.2 Testing Interrupt Latency
  • 9.4.3 Disabling Interrupts
  • 9.4.4 Interrupts From Analog Inputs
  • 9.4.5 Conclusion on Interrupts
  • 9.5 An Introduction to Timers
  • 9.5.1 The Digital Counter
  • 9.5.2 Using the Counter as a Timer
  • 9.5.3 Timers on the mbed
  • 9.6 Using the mbed Timer
  • 9.6.1 Using Multiple mbed Timers
  • 9.6.2 Testing the Timer Maximum Duration
  • 9.7 Using the mbed Timeout
  • 9.7.1 A Simple Timeout Application
  • 9.7.2 Further Use of Timeout
  • 9.7.3 Timeout Used to Test Reaction Time
  • 9.8 Using the mbed Ticker
  • 9.8.1 Using Ticker for a Metronome
  • 9.8.2 Reflecting on Multitasking in the Metronome Program
  • 9.9 The Real-Time Clock
  • 9.10 Switch Debouncing
  • 9.11 Where Do We Go From Here? The Real-Time Operating System
  • 9.11.1 The Limits of Conventional Programming
  • 9.11.2 Introducing the Real-Time Operating System
  • 9.11.3 A Mention of the mbed RTOS
  • 9.12 Mini Projects
  • 9.12.1 A Self-contained Metronome
  • 9.12.2 Accelerometer Threshold Interrupt
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 10 - Memory and Data Management
  • 10.1 A Memory Review
  • 10.1.1 Memory Types
  • 10.1.2 Essential Memory Technologies
  • 10.2 Introducing Pointers
  • 10.3 Using Data Files With the mbed
  • 10.3.1 Reviewing Some Useful C/C++ Library Functions
  • 10.3.2 Defining the mbed Local File System
  • 10.3.3 Opening and Closing Files
  • 10.3.4 Recovering a "Lost" mbed
  • 10.3.5 Writing and Reading File Data
  • 10.4 Example mbed Data File Access
  • 10.4.1 File Access
  • 10.4.2 String File Access
  • 10.4.3 Using Formatted Data
  • 10.5 Using External SD Card Memory With the mbed
  • 10.6 Using External USB Flash Memory With the mbed
  • 10.7 Mini Project: Accelerometer Data Logging on Exceeding Threshold
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • II - Moving to Advanced and Specialist Applications
  • 11 - Wireless Communication - Bluetooth and Zigbee
  • 11.1 Introducing Wireless Data Communication
  • 11.1.1 Some Wireless Preliminaries
  • 11.1.2 Wireless Networks
  • 11.1.3 A Word on Protocols
  • 11.2 Bluetooth
  • 11.2.1 Introducing Bluetooth
  • 11.2.2 The RN-41 and RN-42 Bluetooth Modules
  • 11.2.3 Getting to Know the RN-41
  • 11.2.4 Simple Bluetooth: Sending mbed Data to a PC
  • 11.2.5 Simple Bluetooth: Receiving Bluetooth Data From a PC
  • 11.2.6 More Advanced Bluetooth: Communicating Between Two mbeds
  • 11.2.7 Evaluating Bluetooth
  • 11.3 Zigbee
  • 11.3.1 Introducing Zigbee
  • 11.3.2 Introducing XBee Wireless Modules
  • 11.3.3 Linking to the XBee From a PC
  • 11.3.4 Configuring an XBee Pair
  • 11.3.5 Implementing a Zigbee Link with XBee and the mbed
  • 11.3.6 Introducing the XBee API
  • 11.3.7 Applying the XBee API
  • 11.3.8 Conclusion on Zigbee and Further Work
  • 11.4 Mini Projects
  • 11.4.1 Bluetooth Mini Project
  • 11.4.2 Zigbee Mini Project
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 12 - Internet Communication and Control
  • 12.1 Introduction to Internet Communication
  • 12.2 The Ethernet Communication Protocol
  • 12.2.1 Ethernet Overview
  • 12.2.2 Implementing Simple mbed Ethernet Communications
  • 12.2.3 Ethernet Communication Between mbeds
  • 12.3 Local Area Network Communications With the mbed
  • 12.3.1 Local Area Network Essentials
  • 12.3.2 Using the mbed for Ethernet Network Communications
  • 12.3.3 Using the mbed as an HTTP File Server
  • 12.4 Using Remote Procedure Calls With the mbed
  • 12.4.1 Controlling mbed Outputs With Remote Procedure Calls
  • 12.4.2 Using Remote Procedure Call Variables
  • 12.5 Using the mbed With Wide Area Networks
  • 12.6 The Internet of Things
  • 12.6.1 The Internet of Things Concept
  • 12.6.2 Opportunities and Challenges for Internet of Things Systems
  • 12.6.3 mbed and the Internet of Things
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 13 - Working With Digital Audio
  • 13.1 An Introduction to Digital Audio
  • 13.2 USB MIDI on the mbed
  • 13.2.1 Sending USB MIDI Data From an mbed
  • 13.2.2 Reading USB MIDI Data on the mbed
  • 13.3 Digital Audio Processing
  • 13.3.1 Input and Output of Digital Audio Data With the mbed
  • 13.3.2 Signal Reconstruction
  • 13.4 Digital Audio Filtering Example
  • 13.4.1 Implementing a Digital Low-Pass Filter on the mbed
  • 13.4.2 Digital High-Pass Filter
  • 13.5 Delay/Echo Effect
  • 13.6 Working With Wave Audio Files
  • 13.6.1 The Wave Information Header
  • 13.6.2 Reading the Wave File Header With the mbed
  • 13.6.3 Reading and Outputting Mono Wave Data
  • 13.7 High-Fidelity Digital Audio With the mbed
  • 13.7.1 Texas Instruments TLV320 Audio Codec and the I2S Protocol
  • 13.7.2 Outputting Audio Data From the TLV320
  • 13.7.3 High-Fidelity Wave File Player
  • 13.7.4 High-Fidelity Audio Input (Recording)
  • 13.8 Summary on Digital Audio and Digital Signal Processing
  • 13.9 Mini Project: Portable Music Player
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 14 - Letting Go of the mbed Libraries
  • 14.1 Introduction: How Much Do We Depend on the mbed API
  • 14.2 Control Register Concepts
  • 14.3 Digital Input/Output
  • 14.3.1 LPC1768 Digital Input/Output Control Registers
  • 14.3.2 A Digital Output Application
  • 14.3.3 Adding a Second Digital Output
  • 14.3.4 Digital Inputs
  • 14.4 Getting Deeper Into the Control Registers
  • 14.4.1 Pin Select and Pin Mode Registers
  • 14.4.2 Power Control and Clock Select Registers
  • 14.5 Using the DAC
  • 14.5.1 LPC1768 DAC Control Registers
  • 14.5.2 A DAC Application
  • 14.6 Using the ADC
  • 14.6.1 LPC1768 ADC Control Registers
  • 14.6.2 An ADC Application
  • 14.6.3 Changing ADC Conversion Speed
  • 14.7 A Conclusion on Using the Control Registers
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 15 - Hardware Insights: Clocks, Resets, and Power Supply
  • 15.1 Hardware Essentials
  • 15.1.1 Power Supply and the mbed
  • 15.2 Clock Sources and Their Selection
  • 15.2.1 Some Clock Oscillator Preliminaries
  • 15.2.2 LPC1768 Clock Oscillators and the mbed Implementation
  • 15.2.3 Adjusting the Clock Configuration Register
  • 15.2.4 Adjusting the Phase-Locked Loop
  • 15.2.5 Selecting the Clock Source
  • 15.3 Reset
  • 15.3.1 Power-On Reset
  • 15.3.2 Other Sources of Reset
  • External reset
  • Watchdog timer
  • Brownout detect
  • 15.4 Toward Low Power
  • 15.4.1 How Power Is Consumed in a Digital Circuit
  • 15.4.2 A Word on Cells and Batteries
  • 15.5 Exploring mbed Power Consumption
  • 15.5.1 LPC1768 Current Consumption
  • 15.5.2 Switching Unwanted Things Off!
  • 15.5.3 Manipulating the Clock Frequency
  • 15.5.4 LPC1768 Low-Power Modes
  • 15.6 Getting Serious About Low Power
  • the M0/M0+ Cores and the Zero Gecko
  • 15.6.1 The M0 Cortex Core
  • 15.6.2 The EFM32 Zero Gecko Starter Kit
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • 16 - Developing Commercial Products With mbed
  • 16.1 Embedded Systems Design Process
  • 16.2 Using mbed-Enabled Platforms in Commercial Products
  • 16.3 Implementing the mbed Architecture on a Bespoke Printed Circuit Board
  • 16.4 Programming the LPC1768 Directly
  • 16.5 Case Study: Irisense Temperature Logger With Touch Screen Display
  • 16.6 Closing Remarks
  • Chapter Review
  • Quiz
  • References
  • A - Some Number Systems
  • A.1 Binary, Decimal, and Hexadecimal
  • A.2 Representation of Negative Numbers-Two's Complement
  • A.2.1 Range of Two's Complement
  • A.3 Floating Point Number Representation
  • B - Some C Essentials
  • B.1 A Word About C
  • B.2 Elements of a C Program
  • B.2.1 Keywords
  • B.2.2 Program Features and Layout
  • Declarations
  • Statements
  • Space and layout
  • Comments
  • Code blocks
  • B.2.3 Compiler Directives
  • #include
  • #define
  • B.3 Variables and Data
  • B.3.1 Declaring, Naming, and Initializing
  • B.3.2 Data Types
  • B.3.3 Working With Data
  • B.3.4 Changing Data Type: Casting
  • B.4 Functions
  • B.4.1 The main Function
  • B.4.2 Function Prototypes
  • B.4.3 Function Definitions
  • B.4.4 Using the static Storage Class With Functions
  • B.5 Operators
  • B.6 Flow Control: Conditional Branching
  • B.6.1 If and Else
  • Syntax:
  • B.6.2 Switch Statements and Using break
  • B.7 Flow Control: Program Loops
  • B.7.1 while Loops
  • B.7.2 for Loops
  • B.7.3 Infinite Loops
  • B.7.4 Exiting Loops With break
  • B.8 Derived Data Types
  • B.8.1 Arrays and Strings
  • B.8.2 Pointers
  • B.8.3 Structures and Unions
  • B.9 C Libraries and Standard Functions
  • B.9.1 Header Files
  • B.9.2 Libraries and the C Standard Library
  • B.9.3 Using printf
  • Simple text messages
  • Data messages
  • Combination of text and data
  • B.10 File Access Operations
  • B.10.1 Overview
  • B.10.2 Opening and Closing Files
  • B.10.3 Writing and Reading File Data
  • B.11 Toward Professional Practice
  • References
  • C - mbed Technical Data
  • C.1 Summarizing Technical Details of the mbed
  • C.2 LPC1768 Electrical Characteristics
  • C.2.1 Port Pin Interface Characteristics
  • Supply voltage (3.3V), VDD(3V3)
  • LOW-level input current, IIL
  • HIGH-level input current, IIH
  • Input voltage, VI
  • Output voltage, VO
  • HIGH-level input voltage, VIH
  • LOW-level input voltage, VIL
  • HIGH-level output voltage, VOH
  • LOW-level output voltage, VOL
  • HIGH-level output current, IOH
  • LOW-level output current, IOL
  • HIGH-level short-circuit output current, IOHS
  • LOW-level short-circuit output current, IOLS
  • Pull-down current, Ipd
  • Pull-up current, Ipu
  • C.2.2 Limiting Values
  • D - Parts List
  • E - Using a Host Terminal Emulator
  • E.1 Introducing Host Terminal Applications
  • E.2 Windows Users-Setting Up and Testing Tera Term
  • E.3 Apple Mac and Linux Users-Setting Up and Testing CoolTerm
  • E.4 A More Advanced Host Terminal Example
  • E.5 Shorthand Terminal Communication
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Z
  • Back Cover

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