Pine Bark Beetles

 
 
Elsevier Book Series (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 5. Mai 2016
  • |
  • 316 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802744-8 (ISBN)
 

Pine Bark Beetles, the latest release in the Advances in Insect Physiology series, provides readers with the latest interdisciplinary reviews on the topic. It is an essential reference source for invertebrate physiologists, neurobiologists, entomologists, zoologists, and insect chemists.


  • Contains important, comprehensive, and in-depth reviews on insect physiology
  • Provides an essential reference source for invertebrate physiologists and neurobiologists, entomologists, zoologists, and insect biochemists
  • First published in 1963, this serial is ranked second in the highly competitive ISI category of entomology
0065-2806
  • Englisch
  • London
  • 13,17 MB
978-0-12-802744-8 (9780128027448)
0128027444 (0128027444)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Pine Bark Beetles
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Host Selection by Bark Beetles: Playing the Odds in a High-Stakes Game
  • 1. Challenges and Trade-offs Posed by the Resource: The House Usually Wins
  • 1.1. Ecological and Socioeconomic Importance, Diversity, and Life History of Bark Beetles
  • 1.2. The Lethal Barrier of Tree Defence
  • 1.3. Trade-offs in Host Selection Affecting Beetle Fitness
  • 1.4. Some General Solutions to Winning a Game of Chance in an Uncertain Environment
  • 2. Mechanisms: Making the Most of the Hand You are Dealt
  • 2.1. Multiple Senses in the Host Selection Sequence
  • 2.2. Attraction to Hosts
  • 2.3. Modulation by Antiattractive Signals and the Semiochemical Diversity Hypothesis
  • 2.4. Odour Coding Mechanisms: Recent Advances
  • 2.4.1. Pioneering Studies: Pheromone Responses
  • 2.4.2. Responses to Host- and Non-Host Volatiles
  • 2.4.3. Responses to Volatiles from Weakened vs Vigorous Hosts
  • 2.4.4. OSN Frequency and Antennal Distribution
  • 2.5. Integration of Odour Blends by Co-Localized Neurons: Bark Beetle Research Revealed Novel Coding Mechanisms
  • 2.6. Bark Beetle Chemosensory Genes and Proteins
  • 3. Plasticity: Hedging Your Bets
  • 3.1. A Highly Variable, Largely Unpredictable, and Density-Dependent Host Resource
  • 3.2. The Value of Making Sequential Rather than Absolute Decisions (Why Card-Counters Win)
  • 3.3. Sources and Modalities of Plasticity
  • 3.4. Why Not Cheat?
  • 4. Choosing Among Host Species in a Changing Landscape: There´s More than One Game in Town
  • 4.1. Historical Ranges: Regional Variation and Experience
  • 4.2. Ranges Expanding with Climate Change
  • 4.3. New Geographic Ranges and Host Associations Arising from Human Transport
  • 5. Integrating Mechanistic Knowledge of Host Selection Behaviour with the Landscape Ecology and Management of Bark Beetles
  • 5.1. Integrating Ecology and Physiology, Pattern, and Process
  • 5.2. Management Implications
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter Two: The Role of Population Genetic Structure in Understanding and Managing Pine Beetles
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. What is Population Genetic Structure?
  • 1.2. Biological Influences on Population Genetic Structure
  • 2. The Age of DNA-Based Methods
  • 2.1. Molecular Marker Choice
  • 3. Common Methods of Assessment
  • 3.1. F-Statistics: The Original Method
  • 3.1.1. Case Study: F-Statistics Assess the Influence of Increasing Host Specialization
  • 3.1.2. Case Study: Assessing the Effects of Geographic Isolation with F-Statistics
  • 3.1.3. Case Study: F-Statistics and the Shift Towards Landscape Community Genetics
  • 3.2. Relatedness: The Extreme Similarity Assessment
  • 3.2.1. Case Study: Using Paternity and Relatedness to Infer Population Genetic Structure
  • 3.3. Bayesian Clustering Methods: One of These Is Not Like the Others
  • 3.3.1. Case Study: Beware the Scale of Population Genetic Structure
  • 3.4. Phylogeography: Travelling Back in Time
  • 3.4.1. Case Study: Phylogeography Explains Differential Management of European Pine Beetles
  • 3.4.2. Case Study: Is Gene Flow Historical or Contemporary?
  • 3.5. Old Becomes New: Structure Meets Function
  • 3.5.1. Case Study: Does Adaptive Variation Measure Up with Neutral?
  • 3.5.2. Case Study: Gene Function Can Help Explain Population Genetic Structure Patterns
  • 4. Can Pine Beetle Population Genetic Structure Lead the Way?
  • References
  • Chapter Three: The Proteomics and Transcriptomics of Early Host Colonization and Overwintering Physiology in the Mountain...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Host Colonization
  • 3. Larval Overwintering
  • 4. Implications
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Semiochemicals in the Natural History of Southern Pine Beetle Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann and Their R ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Bark Beetle Population Dynamics
  • 1.2. Dendroctonus frontalis and Idiosyncratic Aspects of its Population Dynamics
  • 2. Host Selection and Discrimination
  • 2.1. The Need for Dual Strategies
  • 2.2. Host Location by Pioneering D. frontalis
  • 3. Concentration of Conspecifics for Mass Attack
  • 3.1. The Aggregation Attractant
  • 3.2. Frontalin
  • 3.3. endo-Brevicomin
  • 3.4. Host Monoterpenes
  • 3.5. trans-Verbenol
  • 3.6. Role of the Two Sexes in Mediating Mass Aggregation
  • 4. Semiochemical Inhibition of Concentration (Antiaggregants)
  • 4.1. Verbenone
  • 4.2. Other Oxygenated Monoterpenes
  • 4.3. Non-Monoterpene Aromatics
  • 5. Attack Sequence
  • 5.1. Establishment and Initiation of Spot Growth
  • 5.2. Persistence and Termination of Spot Growth
  • 6. Geographic Variation
  • 7. Mate Finding and Selection
  • 7.1. Aggregation vs Sex Pheromones
  • 7.2. Pheromones in Reproductive Isolation
  • 8. Semiochemical Interactions with Arthropod Associates
  • 8.1. Interspecific Pheromone Interactions with Other Bark Beetles
  • 8.2. Exploitation of D. frontalis Pheromone by Predators and Parasitoids
  • 9. Exploitation of Semiochemistry in Management of D. frontalis
  • 9.1. Population Monitoring and Prediction
  • 9.2. Direct Control with Semiochemicals
  • 10. Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter Five: The Evolution of Aggregation Pheromone Diversity in Bark Beetles
  • 1. Bark Beetles as Paradigms for Pheromone Research
  • 2. Bark Beetle Aggregation Pheromones: Function and Chemical Diversity
  • 3. The Mode of Evolution of Bark Beetle Aggregation Pheromones
  • 3.1. Saltational Evolution of Bark Beetle Pheromone Composition
  • 3.2. Ecological Drivers of Aggregation Pheromone Diversity
  • 4. A Reanalysis of Bark Beetle Aggregation Pheromone Evolution
  • 4.1. Rationale
  • 4.2. Study Species and Collation of Pheromonal and Phylogenetic Information
  • 4.3. Assessing the Mode of Pheromone Evolution and Phylogenetic Signal in Pheromone Chemistry
  • 4.4. Patterns of Aggregation Pheromone Evolution in Bark Beetles
  • 5. What are the Broad Patterns Underlying Bark Beetle Pheromone Diversity?
  • 5.1. Diversity with a Limited Palette
  • 5.2. Phylogenetic Conservatism vs Lability in Compound Use
  • 6. Mechanisms for Evolutionary Change in Aggregation Pheromone Composition
  • 7. Other Considerations
  • 7.1. Host Tree Synergistic Kairomones
  • 7.2. Chemical Similarity
  • 8. Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Pheromone Production in Pine Bark Beetles
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Origin of Pheromones: Plant Precursors vs De Novo
  • 2.1. Symbiotic Contributions
  • 3. Site of Pheromone Production
  • 4. Endocrine Regulation
  • 5. Ips spp. Metabolic Pathways
  • 5.1. Ipsdienol and Ipsenol
  • 5.2. GPPS/Myrcene Synthase
  • 5.3. Cytochrome P450 (CYP9T2)
  • 5.4. Postmyrcene Hydroxylation Modifications (Evidence)
  • 5.5. Ipsdienol Dehydrogenase
  • 5.6. Molecular Evolution Considerations
  • 6. Dendroctonus spp.: Metabolic Pathways
  • 6.1. Frontalin
  • 6.2. exo-Brevicomin
  • 6.3. trans-Verbenol
  • 6.4. Other Components
  • 7. Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Bark Beetle Research in the Postgenomic Era
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Host Defence Terpene Toxicity
  • 3. Genomics in Bark Beetles
  • 3.1. Genome Sequences in Bark Beetles and Other Beetles
  • 3.2. Transcriptome Data in Bark Beetles
  • 4. Functional Genomics in Bark Beetles
  • 5. Cytochromes P450 in Bark Beetles
  • 6. Functional Characterization of Bark Beetle Genes
  • 7. Future Directions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Index
  • Color Plate
  • Back Cover

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