Forensic Odontology

Principles and Practice
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 28. Dezember 2015
  • |
  • 464 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-86438-8 (ISBN)
 
Forensic odontology refers to the science and practice of dentistry which may be applied to help solve litigation in both criminal and civil cases. It is a specialist branch of dentistry that assists the legal system in the handling, analysis and interpretation of dental evidence.
Forensic Odontology: Principles and Practice pulls together the very latest research findings and advice on best practice and essential skills, including aspects of forensic science that provide a well-rounded educational experience for the reader. Chapters provide coverage of anatomy and morphology, mortuary techniques, physical anthropology, applied forensic sciences, child and elder abuse, and facial approximation. The text introduces the various topics and discusses underpinning philosophies without being an exhaustive historical treatise. Appropriate case studies are used to highlight issues, and references to current research are provided to stimulate further reading and research.
Written by experienced practitioners in the field, this informative introductory text is invaluable to graduate and undergraduate students, as well as experienced dentists, wishing to gain experience or pursue a career in forensic odontology. This text will be a welcome addition to the forensic odontological libraries of all practicing forensic odontologists.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 41,45 MB
978-1-118-86438-8 (9781118864388)
1118864387 (1118864387)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Editors
Jane A. Taylor Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Australia
Jules A. Kieser (Deceased) Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, New Zealand
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Dedications
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 Foundation knowledge in forensic odontology
  • Introduction
  • A short history of forensic odontology
  • Forensic odontology in Australia
  • Forensic odontology in New Zealand
  • Working as an odontologist
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Jurisprudence and forensic practice
  • Legal systems and the healthcare community
  • Types of law
  • The coronial system
  • The investigators within the coroner's jurisdiction
  • Court procedures and the expert medical witness
  • Long-term preparation
  • Medium-term preparation
  • Short-term preparation
  • Logistics of appearing as a witness
  • Refreshing memory
  • Revision of medical knowledge
  • Medico-legal analysis
  • Pre-trial conference
  • Entering the court
  • Conversations outside the court
  • Appearance and behaviour
  • Report writing
  • Reference
  • Recommended reading
  • Chapter 3 Anatomy and morphology
  • Dental anatomy and morphology
  • Morphogenetic fields
  • Additional teeth
  • Hypodontia
  • Shape anomalies
  • Peg lateral incisors
  • General head and neck anatomy
  • Temporomandibular joint (TMJ)
  • Infratemporal fossa
  • Pterygopalatine fossa
  • Mandibular nerve
  • Salivary glands
  • Oral cavity
  • Blood supply and lymphatic drainage of the orodental tissues
  • Osteology of the juvenile and adult craniofacial complex
  • Neurocranium
  • Frontal bone
  • Parietal bone
  • Occipital bone
  • Temporal bone
  • Sphenoid bone
  • Viscerocranium
  • Zygomatic bone
  • Lacrimal bone
  • Ethmoid bone
  • Inferior nasal concha
  • Vomer bone
  • Nasal bone
  • Maxilla
  • Palatine
  • Mandible
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Forensic pathology
  • The role of the forensic pathologist
  • The medico-legal autopsy
  • Post-mortem changes in the deceased
  • Decomposition
  • Radiological examination
  • External examination
  • Head
  • Trunk
  • Limbs
  • Internal examination
  • The face, head and neck
  • The thorax
  • The abdomen and pelvis
  • The genitalia
  • The limbs
  • Post-autopsy procedures
  • Injuries
  • Classification of injuries
  • Injury interpretation
  • Injury and cause of death
  • References
  • Recommended reading
  • Chapter 5 Human identification
  • Human identification
  • We have the right to our name when we die
  • Methods of identification
  • Human dentition
  • Teeth: the last tissue to disintegrate
  • Role of the primary identifiers
  • Visual
  • Fingerprints
  • DNA
  • Medical and anthropological
  • Ante-mortem dental data
  • Dental records or dental data?
  • Dental prostheses
  • Oral implants
  • Orthodontics
  • Radiographic images: facial sinuses and anatomical features within the bone
  • Superimposition
  • Facial reconstruction
  • Standards for acceptance of identification
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Mortuary techniques
  • The dental post-mortem
  • What is the purpose of the dental post-mortem?
  • Components of a dental post-mortem
  • Location
  • Facilities
  • Equipment - basic requirements
  • Ventilation
  • Lighting
  • Examination table
  • Oral health and safety - personal protection
  • Head hair
  • Face
  • Hands
  • Body covering
  • Footwear
  • 'Tools of the trade'
  • Photography
  • Capture device (camera and lens/es) and media
  • Producing and processing images
  • Organising images
  • Using images
  • Backup
  • Archiving
  • Depth of field
  • Fragments and single teeth
  • Radiographic equipment
  • CT scanning equipment
  • Teeth for DNA analysis
  • The 'what and how'
  • Organisation
  • Permissions
  • Examination and recording of the findings
  • The investigative examination
  • The identification examination
  • Detail
  • Written observations and charting
  • Recording of the findings
  • Stress
  • Legibility
  • Language
  • Errors
  • Abbreviations
  • Transcription
  • Charting
  • Clinical notes
  • Radiographic
  • Tissue thicknesses
  • Fragments and single teeth
  • Radiation safety
  • Photographic
  • Impressions
  • Age estimation
  • Condition of the remains
  • Complete body or a partial set of remains?
  • Incomplete and/or fragmented?
  • Are all the teeth and bone sections present?
  • Skeletal remains
  • Incinerated remains
  • Decomposed remains
  • Mummification
  • Immersion
  • Procedure - putting it all together
  • Initial examination
  • Photographic and radiographic examination
  • Access and reflection
  • Intact skulls and mandible
  • Fragmented skulls and mandible
  • Reflection technique
  • Floor of the mouth and tongue
  • Access the maxilla and the oral cavity
  • Resection
  • Bite mark and other pattern recording
  • Reporting recording of results
  • Reports
  • Summary
  • Reference
  • Chapter 7 Age assessment
  • Introduction
  • Some history of age assessment
  • A brief review of dental development
  • Developments in dental-age assessment
  • Current age-estimation methods
  • Australasian specific research in dental age estimation
  • Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Bite marks
  • Introduction
  • Describing bite marks
  • Bite marks are physical evidence
  • Class characteristics
  • Individual characteristics
  • Anatomical locations of bite marks
  • Types of bite marks
  • Not everything is a bite mark
  • Conclusions based on the description of the injury
  • The process of biting and how it relates to bite marks
  • The individuality of the dentition and its transfer to the bite mark
  • The individuality of the human dentition
  • Accuracy of transfer of dental features to bitten tissues
  • Imaging in bite mark cases
  • Avoiding distortions due to perspective
  • Avoiding distortions due to parallax
  • Photographic lighting
  • File format for image files
  • Using alternative light sources
  • Imaging the dental casts for comparison
  • A note on the use of the ABFO No 2 bite mark scale
  • Undertaking the case
  • Case selection
  • The clinical appointments
  • Bite mark analysis
  • Bite mark comparison
  • Presenting bite mark evidence in court
  • Sources of potential distortion and error in bite mark cases
  • Distortions due to tissue properties and movement of a bitten body part
  • Distortions due to evidence collection
  • Distortions due to poor imaging
  • Potentially controllable variables
  • Potentially uncontrollable variables
  • Limitations of bite mark analysis and reporting the outcomes of bite mark comparisons
  • Can we determine the age of the biter from the injury arch dimensions?
  • Can we visually age bite marks?
  • Swabbing for DNA
  • Materials required
  • Method
  • Conclusion
  • Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Forensic odontology in disaster victim identification
  • Disasters and disaster planning
  • Disaster victim identification
  • DVI planning and organisation
  • DVI and forensic odontology
  • Forensic odontology DVI planning
  • DVI operations
  • DVI documentation
  • Health and safety during DVI operations
  • DVI phase 1: the Scene phase
  • The role of the forensic odontologist at the scene
  • Human remains at the scene
  • Recovery of remains
  • DVI phase 2: the Post-mortem phase
  • Mortuary
  • Post-mortem process
  • Personal property and effects documentation
  • Skin friction ridge analysis
  • Forensic pathology examination
  • Post-mortem radiography
  • Post-mortem DNA
  • Anthropology
  • Post-mortem odontology examination
  • Radiology and photography
  • Teeth for DNA
  • Age assessment
  • Odontology quality review
  • Staffing in the mortuary
  • Equipment and PPE in the mortuary
  • DVI phase 3: the Ante-mortem phase
  • Missing persons database (list)
  • Ante-mortem data collection
  • Ante-mortem skin friction ridge records
  • Ante-mortem DNA
  • Ante-mortem dental records
  • Ante-mortem equipment
  • DVI phase 4: the Reconciliation phase
  • Skin friction ridge comparison (reconciliation)
  • DNA reconciliation
  • Odontology reconciliation
  • Detailed reconciliation
  • Formalisation of identification
  • DVI phase 5: the Debrief
  • Administrative arrangements and information management
  • DVI and the people
  • Forensic odontology team organisation
  • Responsibilities
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Forensic anthropology
  • The scope of forensic anthropology
  • Assessment of ancestry
  • Importance of assessment of ancestry
  • Approaches
  • Tooth size and non-metric traits
  • Assessment of sex
  • Approaches
  • Sexual dimorphism in the dentition
  • Sexual dimorphism in juveniles
  • Assessment of age
  • Methods of ageing juvenile and young adults (30 years)
  • Comparative anatomy
  • Historical remains
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Applied forensic sciences
  • Introduction
  • Crime scene protocols
  • Forensic entomology
  • Forensic microbial aquatic taphonomy
  • The use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy in forensic investigations
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Odontology opinions
  • Introduction
  • General principles
  • Types of opinions
  • Identification of dental structures
  • Injuries sustained to the teeth or other oral structures
  • Injuries caused by teeth
  • Child abuse
  • Anatomical/morphometric comparisons
  • Age estimation
  • Tooth selection and sampling for DNA
  • Oral pathology
  • Dental malpractice
  • Report writing
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Forensic odontology management
  • Introduction
  • Administration
  • Education
  • Research
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Application of post-mortem computed tomography to forensic odontology
  • Introduction
  • Computed tomography and medico-legal death investigation
  • Application of PMCT to odontology
  • Computed tomography and Disaster Victim Identification (DVI)
  • Triage of multiple deceased in DVI
  • CT and dental identification in DVI
  • Logistics and infrastructure
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Index
  • Supplemental Images
  • EULA

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