Creative Design Engineering

Introduction to an Interdisciplinary Approach
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 30. März 2016
  • |
  • 194 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804267-0 (ISBN)
 

Creative Design Engineering: Introduction to an Interdisciplinary Approach presents the latest information on a field that has traditionally been primarily concerned with how to make things. However, as technology has advanced, and we have no shortage of things, a new challenge for today's engineers is what to make. In tackling this, our approaches to engineering design have come under the spotlight.

This book presents solutions to this topic in different sections that highlight the basic concerns associated with innovation. First, design is considered a kind of universal human act. Second, it is an interdisciplinary approach that brings together perspectives from fields such as cognitive science and science of knowledge is adopted. Third, the scope of the discussion also includes the process of creating an initial idea for a new product (called the pre-design phase), as well as the use of the product in society (the post-design phase).

Design engineers and researchers in engineering design will find this a user-friendly route to understanding the importance of creativity to engineering and how to implement new techniques to improve design outcomes. The book has been translated from the original Japanese book titled Sozo Dezain Kogaku [Creative Design Engineering] (published by the University of Tokyo Press 2014).


  • Draws on research in industrial design, art, and cognitive science to present a concept of creativity which breaks free of traditional engineering thinking
  • Deconstructs design as a human activity to increase our understanding, helping us create outstanding engineering projects and systems
  • Includes discussion points to help the reader not only explore the concepts in the book, but also apply them to their own design contexts


Toshiharu Taura is the dean and a professor at the Organization of Advanced Science and Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Departments at Kobe University. He started studying what is known as engineering design based on his experience as a mechanical engineer, but with a particular interest in including the viewpoints of industrial design, art, technology, and cognitive science. He is a key figure in the Design Creativity academic field and has led interdisciplinary discussions on this topic. In particular, he founded the Design Creativity Special Interest Group, as part of the Design Society, in 2007. He established the conference on Design Creativity and organized the First International Conference on Design Creativity in 2010 in Kobe, Japan. The series successfully continued to the Second Conference in 2012 in Glasgow, U.K., and the Third Conference in 2015 in Bangalore, India. He also launched the International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation in 2013, and serves as its editor in chief. Taura was a member of Advisory Board of the Design Society from 2007 to 2013, and is a fellow of the Design Research Society.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 9,96 MB
978-0-12-804267-0 (9780128042670)
0128042672 (0128042672)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 - Purpose of Creative Design Engineering
  • 1.1 - Science and technology, products, and society
  • 1.2 - Perspectives on design: analytical and synthetic methods
  • 1.3 - The main questions: why do we design and why are we able to design?
  • 1.4 - The design cycle model: pre-design phase, design phase, and post-design phase
  • 1.5 - Requisite knowledge
  • 1.6 - Structure of this book
  • References
  • Chapter 2 - Motive of Design and the Design Cycle Model
  • 2.1 - Social motive and personal motive
  • 2.2 - Outer motive and inner motive
  • 2.3 - The design cycle model and missing links
  • 2.3.1 - Categories of the Pre-design Phase
  • 2.3.1.1 - Continuous Pre-design Phase
  • 2.3.1.2 - Semi-continuous Pre-design Phase
  • 2.3.1.3 - Non-continuous Pre-design Phase
  • 2.3.2 - Categories of the Design Phase
  • 2.3.2.1 - Original Design
  • 2.3.2.2 - Adaptive Design
  • 2.3.2.3 - Variant Design
  • 2.3.3 - Categories of the Post-design Phase
  • 2.3.3.1 - Continuous Post-design Phase
  • 2.3.3.2 - Semi-continuous Post-design Phase
  • 2.3.3.3 - Non-continuous Post-design Phase
  • 2.3.4 - Aspects of the Design Cycle Model
  • 2.4 - Continuous and non-continuous design cycles
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Aspects of Motive of Design: One Form of Inner and Outer Motive
  • 3.1 - One form of inner motive: complex networks of expanding associations
  • 3.1.1 - Network Structure of the Impression Process
  • 3.1.2 - Network Structure of the Concept Generation Process
  • 3.1.3 - The Association Process in Overcoming the Missing Links in Inner Motive
  • 3.2 - One form of outer motive: latent functions and latent fields
  • 3.2.1 - Functions and Fields
  • 3.2.2 - Inferring Latent Functions and Latent Fields
  • 3.2.3 - Latent Functions in Overcoming the Missing Links in Outer Motive
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - The Metaphor Method: Theory and Methodology of Concept Generation (First Method)
  • 4.1 - Theoretical framework of concept generation using metaphors
  • 4.2 - Methodology of concept generation using property mapping
  • 4.3 - The practice of design using property mapping
  • 4.3.1 - Designing Artifacts Referring to Living Things
  • 4.3.2 - The Spaghetti Tower Design as an Example of the Use of Metaphors
  • 4.3.3 - Function Design Using Property Mapping
  • 4.4 - Multiple loops of design using metaphors
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - The Blending Method: Theory and Methodology of Concept Generation (Second Method)
  • 5.1 - Concept generation using blending
  • 5.2 - Theoretical framework of concept generation using blending
  • 5.2.1 - Blending
  • 5.2.2 - An Overview of General Design Theory
  • 5.2.3 - General Design Theory and Concept Generation Using Blending
  • 5.2.4 - Concept Generation and General Design Theory
  • 5.3 - Alignable difference and nonalignable difference
  • 5.4 - The practice of concept generation using blending
  • 5.4.1 - An Example of Design Using Concept Blending
  • 5.4.2 - Function Design Using Blending
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - Using Thematic Relations: Theory and Methodology of Concept Generation (Third Method)
  • 6.1 - Taxonomic and thematic relations
  • 6.2 - The role of thematic relations in design
  • 6.3 - Methodology and practice of design using thematic relations
  • 6.3.1 - Methodology of Design Using Thematic Relations
  • 6.3.2 - The Practice of Design Using Thematic Relations
  • 6.4 - Function design using thematic relations
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Abduction and Concept Generation
  • 7.1 - Deduction, induction, and abduction
  • 7.2 - Abduction and design
  • 7.2.1 - Hypothesis Generation and Abduction
  • 7.2.2 - Concept Generation and Abduction
  • 7.2.3 - Content and Abduction
  • 7.3 - The relationship between abduction and metaphor
  • References
  • Chapter 8 - Basic Principles of Concept Generation
  • 8.1 - The validity of categorizing concept generation methods into three types
  • 8.2 - First-order concept generation and high-order concept generation
  • 8.3 - The significance of performing high-order concept generation
  • 8.4 - Divergent thinking in creative design
  • 8.5 - Analytical concept generation and synthetic concept generation
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Methodology of Conceptual Design
  • 9.1 - An overview of design methodology
  • 9.2 - Function decomposition
  • 9.3 - Searching for solution principles
  • 9.4 - Firming up into concept variants by combining solution principles
  • 9.5 - Evaluating concept variants
  • Reference
  • Chapter 10 - Basic Principles of Conceptual Design
  • 10.1 - Theoretical framework of conceptual design
  • 10.2 - Characteristics and methodology of function decomposition
  • 10.2.1 - Characteristics of Function Decomposition
  • 10.2.2 - Vertical and Horizontal Decomposition of Functions
  • 10.2.3 - Function Decomposition Using a Hierarchical Lexical Database
  • 10.3 - Function decomposition matrix
  • 10.4 - Analytical function decomposition and synthetic function decomposition
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Competencies Required for Creative Design Thinking and Their Transfer
  • 11.1 - Competencies required for creative design thinking
  • 11.1.1 - The Competency for Determining the Boundaries of Systems Internally or Externally
  • 11.1.2 - The Competency for Abstraction
  • 11.1.3 - The Competency for Going Back and Forth in Time
  • 11.2 - Transferring the competencies required for creative design thinking
  • 11.2.1 - Tacit Knowledge
  • 11.2.2 - History Base for Vicarious Experiences of Creative Design Thinking
  • References
  • Chapter 12 - From Product Design to Technology Design
  • 12.1 - The relationship between science and technology and design
  • 12.2 - Interactions of science and technology and its products with society
  • 12.2.1 - Science and Technology, and Art and Culture
  • 12.2.2 - Science and Technology, and Social Systems
  • 12.2.3 - Science and Technology, and the Cognition Process
  • 12.3 - Analytical and synthetic acceptance
  • 12.4 - Design of technology
  • Reference
  • Chapter 13 - The Meaning of Creative Design Engineering
  • 13.1 - Why do we design?
  • 13.2 - Why are we able to design?
  • 13.3 - The meaning of design in engineering
  • 13.3.1 - What is Correctness in Engineering Education?
  • 13.3.2 - The Limitations of Predicting Product Behavior
  • 13.3.3 - Traits Required of Those Who Design
  • Reference
  • Epilogue
  • Subject Index
  • Back Cover

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