Sexual Biology and Reproduction in Crustaceans

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 27. September 2016
  • |
  • 526 Seiten
 
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978-0-12-809606-2 (ISBN)
 

Sexual Biology and Reproduction in Crustaceans covers crustacean reproduction as it deals with the structural morphology of the gamete-producing primary sex organs, such as the testis and ovary, the formation and maturation of gametes, their fusion during fertilization, and embryonic development that lead to the release of larvae. Constituting a diverse assemblage of animals, crustaceans are best known by their common representatives, such as shrimps, lobsters, and crabs, but also include many more less familiar, but biologically important forms.

This work covers the variety of ways in which both male and female gametes are produced by evolving different sexual systems in crustaceans, the range of reproductive systems, and the accordingly, and highly diverse, mechanistic modes of sex determination. In addition, the book features such topics as genetic and environmental determinants in sex determination pattern, variability of mechanisms of fertilization among different species, the origin of different mating systems, the associated mating and brooding behaviors, and the adaptive ability to different environmental conditions with discussion on the evolutionary ecology of social and sexual systems in certain species, which have shown eusocial tendencies, similar to social insects.

Marine species occupying diversified ecological niches in tropical and temperate zones reproduce under definitive environmental conditions. Therefore, reproductive ecology of different crustaceans inhabiting different ecological niches also constitutes another important aspect of the work, along with yolk utilization and embryogenesis leading to release of different larval forms, which reflect on their aquatic adaptability.


  • Forms a valuable source of recent references on the current research in crustacean reproductive physiology
  • Covers various mating and breeding systems, providing illustrative examples for sexual selection, parental care of developing eggs and embryos, and the evolution of other reproductive behaviors
  • Features contributions written in the form of review articles, enabling readers to not only gain information in the respective subject, but also help them stimulate ideas in their chosen field of research
  • Includes a glossary created by the author to define technical terms
  • Demonstrates the ability of crustacean species to serve as useful model systems for other organisms, to investigate issues related to sexual conflict, mate choice, and sperm competition
  • Discusses techniques in endocrine research to help researchers in aquaculture develop protocols in the control of reproduction


Professor Subramoniam DSc, FNA is Senior Scientist at the Centre for Climate Change Studies, Sathyabama University, Chennai, India. For the past four decades, he has been consistently working and publishing on various aspects of crustacean reproductive biology. He has authored or co-authored nearly 100 journal contributions in addition to scientific reviews and book chapters, and he has taught Developmental Biology and Reproductive Biology to MSc students of Madras University for 30 years. He has also been past Professor and Head of the Dept. of Zoology at Madras, and has received multiple national and international awards over his career, beginning with the Indo-US Fellowship Award/ Senior Fulbright Program in 1986-1987 to visit and work at the University of California, Bodega Marine Laboratory. He has continued to participate in international conferences and workshops including in the UK, US, Germany, France, Belgium, Sweden, Canada, Japan, Philippines, and Singapore.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 7,65 MB
978-0-12-809606-2 (9780128096062)
0128096063 (0128096063)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Sexual Biology and Reproductionin Crustaceans
  • Sexual Biology and Reproduction in Crustaceans
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 - Sex Determination
  • 1.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 1.2 MODES OF SEX DETERMINATION
  • 1.2.1 Genetic Sex Determination
  • 1.2.2 Polygenic Sex Determination
  • 1.3 SEX DETERMINATION IN CLAMP SHRIMP
  • 1.4 SEX-LINKED GENES AND SEX DETERMINATION IN ARTEMIA SALINA
  • 1.5 EPIGENETIC FACTORS ON SEX DETERMINATION
  • 1.5.1 Influence of Environmental Factors on Sex Determination
  • 1.5.1.1 Influence of Temperature, Nutrition, and Parasitism
  • 1.5.1.2 Influence of Photoperiod
  • 1.5.2 Influence of Cytoplasmic Sex Factors on Sex Determination
  • 1.6 EVOLUTION OF SEX-DETERMINING MECHANISM IN ISOPODS
  • 1.6.1 Genetic Sex Determination
  • 1.6.2 Cytoplasmic Sex Determination in Isopods
  • 1.6.3 Intragenomic Conflicts in Isopods
  • 1.7 AMPHIPODS
  • 1.8 DECAPODS
  • 1.9 HORMONAL REGULATION OF SEX DETERMINATION IN CRUSTACEA
  • 2 - Sex Differentiation
  • 2.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 2.2 GONAD DIFFERENTIATION
  • 2.3 FEMALE DIFFERENTIATION IN ORCHESTIA GAMMARELLUS
  • 2.3.1 Secondary Sexual Characteristics
  • 2.4 MALE SEX DIFFERENTIATION IN ORCHESTIA GAMMARELLUS
  • 2.4.1 External Male Characteristics
  • 2.5 SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION IN ISOPODS
  • 2.6 SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION IN DECAPODA
  • 2.7 DISCOVERY OF ANDROGENIC GLAND
  • 2.8 ROLE OF ANDROGENIC GLAND IN MALE SEX DIFFERENTIATION
  • 2.9 ANDROGENIC GLAND HORMONE
  • 2.9.1 Chemical Nature
  • 2.9.2 Isolation of Insulin-like Androgenic Gland Hormone
  • 2.9.3 Silencing of Mr-IAG
  • 2.10 MOLECULAR BASIS OF SEX DIFFERENTIATION
  • 2.10.1 dmrt Gene Expression
  • 2.10.2 Doublesex (Dsx) Gene
  • 2.10.3 Tra Homologue Genes
  • 3 - Sexual Systems
  • 3.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 3.2 GONOCHORISM
  • 3.3 HERMAPHRODITISM
  • 3.3.1 Nonfunctional Hermaphroditism
  • 3.3.2 Sequential Hermaphroditism
  • 3.3.3 Protandric Hermaphroditism
  • 3.3.3.1 Caridean Shrimp
  • 3.3.3.2 The Anomuran Crab Emerita asiatica
  • 3.4 PROTANDRIC SIMULTANEOUS HERMAPHRODITISM
  • 3.5 PROTOGYNY
  • 3.6 ECOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIONARY IMPORTANCE OF SEQUENTIAL HERMAPHRODITISM
  • 3.7 ANDRODIOECY
  • 3.8 INTERSEXUALITY IN CRUSTACEA
  • 3.8.1 Copepods
  • 3.8.2 Amphipods
  • 3.8.3 Decapods
  • 3.9 GYNANDROMORPHISM IN CRUSTACEA
  • 3.9.1 Gynandromorphism in Decapods
  • 3.9.2 Branchiopoda: Anostracans
  • 3.9.3 Methyl Farnesoate Control of Gynandromorphism
  • 3.10 PARTHENOGENESIS
  • 3.10.1 Parthenogenesis in Artemia salina
  • 3.10.2 Parthenogenesis in Daphnia Species
  • 3.10.3 Facultative Parthenogenesis in the Crayfish Orconectes limosus
  • 3.10.4 Parthenogenesis in Marbled Crayfish
  • 4 - Mating Systems
  • 4.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 4.2 FACTORS INFLUENCING MATING SYSTEM
  • 4.2.1 Anisogamy
  • 4.2.2 Availability of Breeding Females
  • 4.2.3 Female Receptivity
  • 4.3 INFLUENCE OF MOLTING ON MATING SYSTEM
  • 4.4 LIFE HISTORY VARIATION AND MATING SYSTEM
  • 4.5 TYPES OF MATING SYSTEMS
  • 4.5.1 Monogamy
  • 4.5.1.1 Stomatopods
  • 4.5.1.2 Pair-Forming Parasitic Pea Crabs
  • 4.5.1.3 Desert Isopod Hemilepistus reaumuri
  • 4.5.1.4 Caridean Shrimps
  • 4.6 SOCIAL MONOGAMY
  • 4.6.1 Symbiotic Shrimp Pontonia margarita
  • 4.6.2 Snapping Shrimp
  • 4.6.3 Crab Planes major
  • 4.7 EUSOCIALITY IN SPONGE-DWELLING SNAPPING SHRIMP SYNALPHEUS
  • 4.8 SOCIAL MONOGAMY TO EUSOCIALITY
  • 4.9 BROMELIAD CRABS
  • 4.10 POLYGAMY
  • 4.11 POLYGYNY
  • 4.11.1 Scramble-Competition Polygyny
  • 4.11.2 Host Defense Polygyny
  • 4.11.3 Female-Centered Polygyny
  • 4.12 POLYANDRY
  • 4.13 POLYGYNANDRY
  • 4.14 AGGREGATIONAL MATING IN SAND CRABS
  • 4.15 MATING SYSTEMS IN HERMAPHRODITES
  • 5 - Mating Behavior
  • 5.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 5.2 PURE SEARCHING
  • 5.2.1 Female-Centered Competition
  • 5.2.2 Resource-Centered Competition
  • 5.3 MATE GUARDING
  • 5.3.1 Mate Guarding in Decapoda
  • 5.3.2 Mate Guarding in Amphipods
  • 5.3.3 Mate Guarding in Isopods
  • 5.4 ALTERNATIVE MATING STRATEGY
  • 5.5 MALE MORPHOTYPES AND ALTERNATIVE MATING TACTICS
  • 5.6 MATING CONTESTS
  • 5.6.1 Intersexual Conflict of Reproductive Interests
  • 5.6.2 Female Mate Choice
  • 6 - Sex Pheromones
  • 6.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 6.2 TYPES OF PHEROMONE
  • 6.2.1 Sex Pheromones in Brachyuran Crabs
  • 6.2.1.1 Chemical Nature
  • 6.2.2 Lobsters and Crayfishes
  • 6.2.3 Caridean Shrimps
  • 6.2.3.1 Chemical Nature of Contact Pheromones
  • 6.2.4 Amphipods
  • 6.3 CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • 7 - Reproductive Cycle and Environmental Control
  • 7.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 7.2 PATTERNS OF REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE
  • 7.3 CONTINUOUS REPRODUCTION
  • 7.4 SEMIANNUAL REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE
  • 7.5 ANNUAL REPRODUCTION
  • 7.6 IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE
  • 7.7 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AFFECTING REPRODUCTION
  • 8 - Oogenesis
  • 8.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 8.1.1 Morphology of Female Reproductive System
  • 8.1.2 Structure of the Ovary
  • 8.2 CHELICERATE AND MANDIBULATE TYPE OF OVARY
  • 8.3 OOGENESIS
  • 8.3.1 Oocyte Proliferation
  • 8.3.2 Follicle Cells
  • 8.3.3 Nurse Cells
  • 8.4 OOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION
  • 8.5 BIOGENESIS OF YOLK
  • 8.6 ENDOGENOUS YOLK SYNTHESIS
  • 8.7 EXOGENOUS YOLK SYNTHESIS
  • 8.8 VITELLOGENIN
  • 8.8.1 Phylogenetic Analysis of Vg
  • 8.8.2 Vg Gene Expression and Yolk Synthesis
  • 8.8.3 Vitellogenin Receptor and Yolk Protein Uptake
  • 8.9 YOLK PROCESSING
  • 8.10 CRUSTACEAN LIPOVITELLIN
  • 8.11 CORTICAL ROD FORMATION
  • 9 - Endocrine Regulation of Vitellogenesis
  • 9.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 9.2 EYESTALK INHIBITORY HORMONES
  • 9.3 VITELLOGENESIS-INHIBITING HORMONE
  • 9.4 ANDROGENIC HORMONE
  • 9.5 GONAD-STIMULATING HORMONES
  • 9.5.1 Vitellogenesis-Stimulating Hormones
  • 9.5.2 Stimulatory Action of CHH Peptides
  • 9.5.3 Biogenic Amines and Opiod Peptides
  • 9.5.4 Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
  • 9.5.5 Vertebrate-Type Gonadotropins
  • 9.5.6 Bursicon
  • 9.5.7 Prostaglandins
  • 9.5.8 Vg-Stimulating Ovarian Hormone
  • 9.5.9 Methyl Farnesoate
  • 9.5.10 Steroidal Control of Vitellogenesis
  • 9.5.10.1 Ecdysteroids
  • 9.5.10.2 Vertebrate Steroids
  • 9.6 FUTURE PERSPECTIVES ON APPLICATION OF ENDOCRINE RESEARCH TO CRUSTACEAN AQUACULTURE
  • 10 - Yolk Utilization and Embryonic Nutrition
  • 10.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 10.2 EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT
  • 10.3 BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANALYSIS
  • 10.4 LIPID UTILIZATION IN EMBRYOS AND LARVAE
  • 10.5 YOLK PROTEINS
  • 10.5.1 Breakdown of Lipovitellin
  • 10.5.2 Yolk Utilization in Emerita asiatica
  • 10.6 ENERGY UTILIZATION
  • 10.7 ENZYME ACTIVITY DURING YOLK PROTEIN DEGRADATION
  • 10.8 CAROTENOID METABOLISM
  • 10.9 EMBRYONIC ECDYSTEROIDS
  • 10.10 VERTEBRATE STEROIDS
  • 11 - Spermatogenesis
  • 11.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 11.2 MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM
  • 11.2.1 Morphology of the Testis
  • 11.3 SPERMATOGENESIS
  • 11.3.1 Spermatogenesis in Brachyuran Crabs
  • 11.4 SPERMIOGENESIS
  • 11.4.1 Acrosome Formation in the Shrimp Sicyonia ingentis
  • 11.5 SPERM MORPHOLOGY
  • 11.5.1 Decapod Spermatozoa
  • 11.5.2 Reptantian Spermatozoa
  • 11.5.2.1 Ultrastructure of Crab Spermatozoa
  • 11.5.2.2 Anomuran Sperm
  • 11.5.2.3 Lobster Spermatozoa
  • 11.5. 3 Natantian Sperm
  • 11.5.3.1 Dendrobranchiate Spermatozoa
  • 11.5.3.2 Caridean Shrimp Sperm
  • 11.6 SPERM MORPHOLOGY IN THALASSINIDEA
  • 11.7 FLAGELLATE SPERMATOZOA OF CIRRIPEDES
  • 11.8 MOTILE SPERMATOZOA OF THE OSTRACOD CYPRIDOPSIS
  • 11.9 NONMOTILE SPERMATOZOA OF ARTEMIA
  • 11.10 SPERM STRUCTURE AND SPERMATOGENESIS IN COPEPODA
  • 11.11 REMIPEDE SPERM
  • 11.12 ENDOCRINE REGULATION OF SPERM PRODUCTION
  • 12 - Spermatophore and Sperm Transfer Mechanisms
  • 12.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 12.2 SPERMATOPHORE MORPHOLOGY
  • 12.2.1 Spermatophore Morphology and Diversity in Decapods
  • 12.2.1.1 Brachyuran Crabs
  • 12.2.1.1.1 Origin of Spermatophores
  • 12.2.1.1.2 Chemical Composition of Spermatophores and Seminal Plasma
  • 12.2.1.1.3 Sperm Transport in Decapods
  • 12.2.2 Anomura
  • 12.2.2.1 Morphological Diversity
  • 12.2.2.1.1 Paguroidea
  • 12.2.2.1.2 Spermatophores of Hippidae
  • 12.2.3 Macrura
  • 12.2.3.1 Lobsters
  • 12.2.3.1.1 The Origin of Spermatophores
  • 12.2.3.1.2 Spermatophore Composition and the Mode of Attachment
  • 12.2.3.2 Crayfish Spermatophore
  • 12.2.4 Penaeoid Shrimps
  • 12.2.5 Caridean Shrimp
  • 12.2.6 Copepoda
  • 12.2.6.1 Origin of Spermatophore
  • 12.2.6.2 Chemical Composition of Spermatophore
  • 12.2.7 Peracarids
  • 12.2.8 Spermatophores in Other Crustaceans
  • 12.3 FUNCTIONAL ATTRIBUTES AND EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVES
  • 13 - Accessory Reproductive Glands
  • 13.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 13.2 FEMALE DUCTAL GLANDS
  • 13.3 OVIDUCTAL GLANDS OF CIRRIPEDES
  • 13.4 NATURE OF OVISAC SECRETION
  • 13.5 DISINTEGRATION OF SAC WALL
  • 13.6 SPERMATHECA
  • 13.6.1 Spermatheca of Primitive Brachyurans
  • 13.6.2 Spermatheca of Higher Brachyuran Crabs
  • 13.6.3 Secretory Activity of Spermatheca
  • 13.6.4 Spermatheca in Nonmalacostracans
  • 13.7 SHELL GLANDS IN ANOSTRACA
  • 13.7.1 Egg Shell Formation in Streptocephalus dichotomus
  • 13.8 INTEGUMENTAL GLANDS
  • 13.9 CEMENT GLANDS OF CRAYFISH
  • 13.9.1 Cement Gland of Stomatopods
  • 13.10 MALE ACCESSORY SEX GLANDS
  • 13.10.1 Male Accessory Glands in Brachyuran Crabs
  • 13.10.2 Male Accessory Gland of Stomatopods
  • 13.11 ACCESSORY GLAND SECRETIONS: A FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION
  • 14 - Fertilization
  • 14.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 14.2 RESUMPTION OF MEIOTIC MATURATION
  • 14.3 MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF MEIOTIC MATURATION
  • 14.4 HORMONAL CONTROL OF MEIOTIC MATURATION
  • 14.5 EGG ACTIVATION
  • 14.5.1 Cortical Reaction
  • 14.5.1.1 Cortical Reaction in Penaeus aztecus
  • 14.5.1.2 Mg2+-Dependent Egg Activation in Sicyonia ingentis
  • 14.5.1.3 Cortical Reaction and Hatching Envelope Formation
  • 14.5.1.4 Cortical Reaction in Crabs
  • 14.5.1.5 Cortical Reaction in Lobster and Crayfish
  • 14.6 ELECTRICAL EVENTS AT EGG ACTIVATION
  • 14.6.1 Electrical Response to Egg Activation in Crab
  • 14.6.2 Electrical Response in Lobster Eggs
  • 14.6.3 Electrical Response in the Prawn P. serratus
  • 14.7 SPERM ACTIVATION
  • 14.7.1 Sperm Capacitation
  • 14.7.2 Acrosome Reaction
  • 14.7.2.1 Acrosome Reaction in the Marine Shrimp Sicyonia ingentis
  • 14.7.2.2 Acrosome Reaction in the Penaeid Shrimp Penaeus monodon
  • 14.7.2.3 Acrosome Reaction in Homarus americanus
  • 14.7.2.4 Acrosome Reaction in Crabs
  • 14.8 SPERM-EGG INTERACTION AND PRONUCLEAR FUSION
  • Glossary
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Back Cover

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