Pro Tools All-in-One For Dummies

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 4. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 27. September 2018
  • |
  • 784 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-51449-7 (ISBN)
 
A complete Pro Tools reference - from recording to mixing to mastering Pro Tools has long been the recording industry's leading solution for capturing, mixing, and outputting audio. While it was once a tool known and used exclusively by engineers in pro studios, it is now readily available to anyone wishing to create their own recording. This updated edition of Pro Tools All-in-One For Dummies covers the features you'll encounter in both Pro Tools | First as well as the versions designed for next-level recording. It guides you through the very basics of recording, capturing both live and digital instruments, how to sweeten your sound in mixing, and how to tweak and output your final master. Now get ready to make some beautiful sounds! * Get up to speed with recording basics * Pick the Pro Tools version that works for you * Record acoustic audio * Get to know MIDI * Discover how to set compression and EQ * Sweeten your final product with mastering * Create a final file you can stream online Assuming no past experience with audio recording, this book shares the basics of recording and how to capture both live and digital instruments using Pro Tools.
4. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Überarbeitete Ausgabe
  • 29,69 MB
978-1-119-51449-7 (9781119514497)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Jeff Strong is a musician and recording engineer, as well as the founder of Brain Shift Radio (www.brainshiftradio.com) and president of the Strong Institute. He has owned or worked in a recording studio since 1985 and has released dozens of CDs.
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • About This Book
  • Foolish Assumptions
  • Icons Used in This Book
  • Beyond the Book
  • Where to Go from Here
  • Book 1 Getting Started with Pro Tools
  • Chapter 1 Discovering What You Need
  • Eyeing the Big Picture
  • Piping the Music into Pro Tools
  • Interpreting input devices
  • Deciphering direct boxes
  • Perusing the preamp
  • Meeting the Mixer
  • Managing the MIDI Controller
  • Recognizing the Recorder
  • Digital recorders
  • The computer
  • Signing On to Signal Processors
  • Equalizers (EQ)
  • Dynamic processors
  • Effects processors
  • Making Sense of Monitors
  • Headphones
  • Speakers
  • Mastering Media
  • CD
  • Computer files
  • Chapter 2 Configuring Your Computer
  • Using Pro Tools on a Mac
  • Understanding Mac system requirements
  • Setting system settings
  • Installing the program
  • Using Pro Tools on a PC
  • Understanding PC system requirements
  • Preparing to install Pro Tools software
  • Connecting your hardware
  • Installing the program
  • Keeping Bugs at Bay: Good Habits to Get Into
  • Back up your data often
  • Back up your system drive
  • Chapter 3 Choosing and Setting Up Your Hardware
  • Examining Audio Interface Specifications
  • Exploring Some Popular Audio Interfaces
  • Apogee
  • Focusrite Scarlett
  • M-Audio
  • Exploring Avid's Eleven Rack
  • Discovering the Eleven Rack input and outputs
  • Connecting your gear to an Eleven Rack
  • Examining Eleven Rack's guitar-processing features
  • Connecting Your Audio Interface
  • Connecting to a Windows computer
  • Connecting to a Macintosh computer
  • Chapter 4 Examining Software Basics
  • Keeping Software Straight
  • Looking at Pro Tools versions
  • Differences between Macs and PCs
  • Getting Set Up
  • Playing with the Playback Engine settings
  • Setting hardware settings
  • The ins and outs of inputs and outputs
  • Dealing with Sessions
  • Creating a new session
  • Opening sessions
  • Saving sessions
  • Creating a session template
  • Getting to Know Audio and MIDI Files
  • Understanding audio files
  • Meeting MIDI files
  • Finding your session files
  • Book 2 Understanding Recording Basics
  • Chapter 1 Getting Connected: Setting Up Your Studio
  • Understanding Analog Connections
  • The ¼-inch analog plug
  • XLR
  • RCA
  • Delving In to Digital Connections
  • MIDI
  • AES/EBU
  • S/PDIF
  • ADAT Lightpipe
  • TDIF
  • USB
  • FireWire
  • Thunderbolt
  • Working Efficiently in Your Studio
  • Setting up your studio for comfort and efficiency
  • Taming heat and dust
  • Monitoring your monitors
  • Optimizing Your Studio
  • Sound isolation
  • Sound control
  • Chapter 2 Understanding Signal Flow
  • Meeting the Many Mixer Types
  • Analog mixer
  • Digital mixer
  • The computer control surface
  • Understanding Mixer Basics
  • Channel strip
  • Input jack
  • Insert jack
  • Trim knob
  • Equalization
  • Channel Auxiliary (Aux) Send knobs
  • Pre/Post switch
  • Pan knob
  • Mute switch
  • Solo switch
  • Assign switches
  • Faders
  • Routing/Busing Signals
  • Master fader
  • Sub (submix) faders
  • Solo/Mute switches
  • Control Room level knob
  • Phones knob
  • Auxiliary (Aux) Send knobs
  • Auxiliary (Aux) Return knobs
  • Aux Assign
  • Master Level meters
  • Deciphering Output Jacks
  • Master Out jack
  • Phones jack
  • Monitors jack
  • Direct Out jacks
  • Aux Return jacks
  • Making Life Easier with a Patch Bay
  • Chapter 3 Understanding the Pro Tools Windows
  • Tackling the Transport Window
  • Adjusting the Transport window
  • Basic controls
  • Counters
  • Expanded
  • MIDI controls
  • Synchronization
  • Track collaboration
  • Output meters
  • Examining the Edit Window
  • Taking a look at track controls
  • Examining edit modes
  • Taking a look at Track Collaboration tools
  • Zeroing in on Zoom controls
  • Elucidating edit tools
  • Looking at counter displays
  • Evaluating the Event Edit area
  • Additional Navigation Controls
  • Looking at lists
  • Rulers rule!
  • Managing the Mix Window
  • Checking out channel strips
  • Expanding the channel strips view
  • Looking at lists: The Mix Window variant
  • Working with Window Configurations
  • Creating window configurations
  • Recalling window configurations
  • Managing window configurations
  • Editing window configurations
  • Updating window configurations
  • Deleting window configurations
  • Chapter 4 Importing and Exporting Files
  • Importing into a Session
  • Importing audio files
  • Importing MIDI files
  • Importing tracks
  • Exporting from a Session
  • Exporting audio
  • Exporting MIDI
  • Managing Files
  • Compacting files
  • Deleting unwanted files
  • Backing up data
  • Book 3 Recording Live Audio and Acoustic Instruments
  • Chapter 1 Taking Care of Tracks
  • Understanding Tracks in Pro Tools
  • Track types
  • Track formats
  • Setting Up Tracks
  • Creating new tracks
  • Duplicating tracks
  • Naming tracks
  • Assigning inputs and outputs
  • Altering Your View of Tracks
  • Showing and hiding tracks
  • Assigning track color
  • Changing track size
  • Moving tracks around
  • Deleting tracks
  • Grouping Tracks
  • Keeping track of grouped track parameters
  • Defining group attributes
  • Enabling groups
  • Modifying groups
  • Soloing and Muting
  • Managing Track Voices
  • Assigning voices
  • Setting voice priority
  • Freeing up a voice from a track
  • Chapter 2 Understanding Microphones
  • Meeting the Many Microphone Types
  • Construction types
  • Polarity patterns
  • Assessing Your Microphone Needs
  • Deciding How Many Microphones and What Kind
  • Getting started
  • Movin' on
  • Going all out
  • Finding the Right Mic for the Situation
  • Partnering Mics with Preamps
  • Solid-state
  • Tube
  • Hybrid
  • Considering Compressors
  • Looking at Preamp, Compressor, and Equalizer Combos
  • Analyzing Some Microphone Accessories
  • Microphone cords
  • Stands
  • Pop filters
  • Caring for Your Microphones
  • Daily care for your mics
  • Storing your mics
  • Chapter 3 Miking: Getting a Great Source Sound
  • Tracing Typical Microphone Techniques
  • Spot miking
  • Distant miking
  • Ambient miking
  • Stereo miking
  • Mic combinations
  • Taming Transients
  • Setting your levels properly
  • Placing mics properly
  • Compressing carefully
  • Setting Up Your Mics: Some Suggestions
  • Vocals
  • Backup vocals
  • Electric guitar
  • Electric bass
  • Acoustic guitars and such
  • Horns
  • Piano
  • Strings
  • Drum set
  • Hand drums
  • Percussion
  • Chapter 4 Preparing to Record
  • Recognizing Record Modes
  • Non-Destructive Record mode
  • Destructive Record mode
  • Loop Record mode
  • QuickPunch Record mode
  • Dealing with Disk Allocation
  • Enabling Recording
  • Record-enabling
  • Using Latch Record Enable mode
  • Running Record Safe mode
  • Setting Levels
  • Setting a Record Range
  • Monitoring Your Tracks
  • Setting up monitoring
  • Choosing a monitor mode
  • Linking and unlinking Record and Playback faders
  • Adjusting monitoring latency
  • Using low-latency monitoring
  • Creating a Click Track
  • Getting a click track the easy way
  • Getting a click track the hard way
  • Setting the tempo
  • Choosing the meter
  • Enabling a click track
  • Setting up tempo and meter events
  • Chapter 5 Recording Audio
  • Recording Tracks
  • Recording a single track
  • Managing multiple tracks
  • Using pre- and post-rolls
  • Playing Back Your Tracks
  • Playing recorded tracks
  • Setting scrolling options
  • Listening to playback loops
  • Using the Scrub feature
  • Doing Additional Takes
  • Starting over from scratch
  • Punching in and out
  • Loop recording
  • Using QuickPunch
  • Overdubbing: Recording additional tracks
  • Recording to playlists
  • Auditioning takes
  • Getting Rid of Unwanted Takes
  • Canceling your performance
  • Undoing your take
  • Clearing the file from the Audio Clips list
  • Book 4 Recording Electronic Instruments with MIDI
  • Chapter 1 Understanding Electronic Instruments and MIDI
  • Meeting MIDI
  • Perusing MIDI ports
  • Understanding MIDI channels
  • Appreciating MIDI messages
  • Managing modes
  • General MIDI
  • Getting Started with MIDI
  • Sound generators
  • Samplers
  • Chapter 2 Preparing to Record MIDI
  • Setting Up Your MIDI Devices
  • Enabling MIDI devices in Mac OS X
  • Enabling MIDI devices in Windows
  • Running MIDI Thru
  • Managing the MIDI Input filter
  • Quantizing your inputs
  • Offsetting MIDI tracks
  • Getting Ready to Record
  • Creating MIDI and instrument tracks
  • Setting inputs, outputs, and MIDI channels
  • Creating a click track
  • Chapter 3 Recording Electronic Instruments with MIDI
  • Recording MIDI Performances
  • Enabling recording for MIDI and instrument tracks
  • Setting the Wait for Note option
  • Monitoring MIDI inputs
  • Hearing instrument tracks
  • Recording MIDI and instrument tracks
  • Retroactively recording MIDI and instrument performances
  • Playing Back Your Tracks
  • Playing recorded tracks
  • Setting scrolling options
  • Changing sounds
  • Getting Rid of Unwanted Takes
  • Canceling your performance
  • Undoing your take
  • Clearing the file from the Clips list
  • Overdubbing MIDI Performances
  • Using MIDI Merge/Replace
  • Punching in and out
  • Punching MIDI on the fly
  • Loop recording
  • Recording System-Exclusive Data
  • Book 5 Editing Your Performances (Audio and MIDI)
  • Chapter 1 Audio Editing Basics
  • Understanding Pro Tools Editing
  • Nondestructive editing
  • Editing during playback
  • Getting to Know Clip Types
  • Viewing Clips
  • Selecting the track view
  • Adjusting the track height
  • Assigning clip-name and time-location displays
  • Zooming in and out
  • Understanding Edit Modes
  • Setting grid resolution
  • Displaying grid lines
  • Working (Okay, Playing) with Playlists
  • Creating a new playlist
  • Duplicating a playlist
  • Deleting a playlist
  • Renaming playlists
  • Assigning a playlist to a different track
  • Choosing playlists
  • Using the Audio Clips List
  • Selecting clips
  • Using the Audio Clips list drop-down menu
  • Displaying clip information
  • Managing Undos
  • Setting levels of Undo
  • Performing Undos
  • Knowing when you can no longer Undo
  • Chapter 2 Selecting Material to Edit
  • Selecting Track Material
  • Selecting part of a clip
  • Selecting across multiple tracks
  • Selecting an entire clip
  • Selecting two clips and any space between them
  • Selecting an entire track
  • Selecting all clips in all tracks
  • Selecting on the fly
  • Selecting with the Selection Indicator fields
  • Selecting objects using the Object Grabber tool
  • Making a selection with the Tab to Transients function
  • Making Changes to Your Selection
  • Changing a selection's length
  • Nudging selections
  • Extending selection lengths
  • Moving and extending selections between tracks
  • Managing Memory Locations
  • Dealing with the New Memory Location dialog box
  • Creating memory locations
  • Getting to know the Memory Locations window
  • Recalling memory locations
  • Editing memory locations
  • Playing Selected Material
  • Playing your selection
  • Using pre- and post-rolls
  • Auditioning start and end points
  • Looping your selection's playback
  • Chapter 3 Getting into Editing
  • Editing Clips
  • Creating clips
  • Healing clips
  • Placing clips in tracks
  • Using clip synch points
  • Aligning clips
  • Trimming clips
  • Moving clips
  • Locking clips
  • Quantizing clips
  • Muting/unmuting clips
  • Splitting stereo tracks
  • Examining Edit Commands
  • Using the Cut command
  • Using the Copy command
  • Clearing selections
  • Performing a paste
  • Using the Duplicate command
  • Performing a repeat
  • Exploring Elastic Audio
  • Enabling Elastic Audio
  • Viewing Elastic Audio events
  • Quantizing audio tracks
  • Chapter 4 Adding to Your Audio Editing Palette
  • Signing On to the Smart Tool
  • Using the Smart tool in Waveform view
  • Using the Smart tool in Automation view
  • Perusing the Pencil Tool
  • Creating a copy of the original file
  • Using the Pencil tool to redraw a waveform
  • Silencing Selections
  • Stripping silence
  • Inserting silence
  • Performing Fades and Crossfades
  • Dealing with the Fades dialog box
  • Creating crossfades
  • Fading in and out
  • Creating batch fades
  • Cleaning Up Your Session
  • Consolidating selections
  • Removing unused clips
  • Compacting a file
  • Chapter 5 Editing MIDI Data
  • Working with MIDI and Instrument Tracks
  • Taking a look at track views
  • Selecting track material
  • Recognizing clips
  • Setting MIDI patches on tracks
  • Dealing with Note Chasing
  • Editing MIDI in the Edit Window
  • Perusing the Pencil tools
  • Custom note duration
  • Adding MIDI events
  • Deleting MIDI data
  • Changing MIDI events
  • Editing program data
  • Changing continuous controller data
  • Using the Smart tool
  • Exploring MIDI Events
  • Exploring the MIDI Event List window
  • Editing in the MIDI Event List
  • Chapter 6 Performing MIDI Operations
  • Getting Used to the MIDI Operations Window
  • Performing MIDI Event Operations
  • Grid/Groove Quantize
  • Change Velocity
  • Change Duration
  • Transpose
  • Select/Split Notes
  • Input Quantize
  • Step Input
  • Restore Performance
  • Flatten Performance
  • Recognizing MIDI Real-Time Properties
  • Book 6 Mixing
  • Chapter 1 Mixing Basics
  • Understanding Mixing
  • Managing Levels as You Work
  • Getting Started Mixing Your Song
  • Mixing In Pro Tools
  • Using a control surface
  • Using a MIDI controller
  • Using a digital mixer
  • Using an analog mixer
  • Using the Stereo Field
  • Left or right
  • Front or back
  • Adjusting Levels: Enhancing the Emotion of the Song
  • Dynamics
  • The arrangement
  • Tuning Your Ears
  • Listening critically
  • Choosing reference music
  • Dealing with ear fatigue
  • Making several versions
  • Chapter 2 Setting Up Your Mix
  • Revisiting the Mix Window
  • Getting to Know Signal Flow
  • Rounding Out Your Routing
  • Using a Master fader
  • Adding auxiliary inputs
  • Inserting inserts
  • Turning off the effect in an insert
  • Setting up sends
  • Accessing Output Windows
  • Tackling Track Output windows
  • Setting up the Send Output window
  • Playing with Plug-ins
  • Real Time Plug-ins
  • Using AudioSuite offline plug-ins
  • Using AudioSuite plug-ins to process an audio clip
  • Processing with External Effects
  • Creating a hardware insert
  • Connecting your external device
  • Routing your track
  • Chapter 3 Using Equalization
  • Exploring Equalization
  • Parametric
  • Low-shelf/high-shelf
  • Low-pass/high-pass
  • Dialing In EQ
  • Inserting an EQ plug-in in a track
  • Perusing Pro Tools EQ options
  • Equalizing Your Tracks
  • General EQ guidelines
  • Equalizing vocals
  • Equalizing guitar
  • Equalizing bass
  • Equalizing drums
  • Equalizing percussion
  • Equalizing piano
  • Equalizing horns
  • Chapter 4 Digging into Dynamics Processors
  • Connecting Dynamics Processors
  • Introducing Compressors
  • Getting to know compressor parameters
  • Getting started using compression
  • Using compression
  • Looking into Limiters
  • Understanding limiter settings
  • Setting limits with the BF-76 limiter
  • Introducing Gates and Expanders
  • Getting to know gate parameters
  • Getting started using gates
  • Getting started using an expander
  • Detailing the De-Esser
  • Setting Up Side Chains
  • Setting up a side chain
  • Using a side chain
  • Chapter 5 Singling Out Signal Processors
  • Routing Your Effects
  • Inserting effects
  • Sending signals to effects
  • Rolling Out the Reverb
  • Seeing reverb settings
  • Getting started using reverb
  • Detailing Delay
  • Digging into delay settings
  • Getting started using delay
  • Creating Chorus Effects
  • Chapter 6 Automating Your Mix
  • Understanding Automation
  • Audio tracks
  • Auxiliary input tracks
  • Instrument tracks
  • Master fader tracks
  • MIDI tracks
  • Accessing Automation Modes
  • Setting Automation Preferences
  • Enabling Automation
  • Suspending or enabling automation across all tracks
  • Suspending automation for an individual track
  • Writing Automation
  • Writing automation on a track
  • Writing plug-in automation
  • Writing send automation
  • Viewing Automation
  • Drawing Automation
  • Thinning Automation
  • Automatically thinning data
  • Using the Thin command
  • Editing Automation Data
  • Using editing commands
  • Editing with (surprise!) the edit tools
  • Chapter 7 Making Your Mix
  • Submixing by Recording to Tracks
  • Mixing in-the-Box
  • Examining bounce options
  • Performing the bounce
  • Using an External Master Deck
  • Book 7 Mastering
  • Chapter 1 Mastering Basics
  • Demystifying Mastering
  • Processing
  • Sequencing
  • Leveling
  • Getting Ready to Master
  • Paying a Pro, or Doing It Yourself
  • Hiring a Professional Mastering Engineer
  • Chapter 2 Mastering Your Music
  • Considering General Guidelines
  • Setting Up a Mastering Session
  • Optimizing Dynamics
  • Perfecting Tonal Balance
  • Balancing Levels
  • Mastering Your Mix
  • Making the most of your bits
  • Settling on a sample rate
  • Choosing a bounce mode
  • Sequencing Your Songs
  • Book 8 Getting Your Music to the Masses
  • Chapter 1 Putting Your Music on CD and Vinyl
  • Getting into CD Burning
  • Purchasing CD-Rs
  • Recording Your Music to CD-R
  • Dealing with diversity: Using different CD recorders
  • Burning for mass production
  • Making Multiple Copies
  • Making copies yourself
  • Having someone else making copies
  • Pressing Vinyl
  • Promoting Your Music
  • Chapter 2 Getting Your Music on the Internet
  • Understanding Downloadable Music Files
  • Bit rate
  • Mode
  • Creating MP3 Files
  • Choosing encoding software
  • Encoding your music
  • Setting Up Your Own Music Website
  • Checking out musician-friendly hosting services
  • Designing your site
  • Putting Your Music on a Music Host Site
  • Engaging in Social Media Networking
  • Offering Free Downloads
  • Selling Your Music Digitally
  • Licensing Your Music
  • Podcasting
  • Selling Your CDs
  • Promoting Your Music
  • Connecting with an Email Newsletter
  • Index
  • EULA

Chapter 1

Discovering What You Need


IN THIS CHAPTER

Understanding the components of a home studio

Discovering how each component contributes to the final sound

Whether you use a PC- or Mac-based system for your Pro Tools studio, your home recording system of choice employs much of the same basic technology. In fact, your simple Pro Tools studio consists of the same basic components as a typical, million-dollar, professional studio complex.

In this chapter, you discover the purpose of each component of a home recording studio, and you also discover how each of these components relates to the quality of sound you ultimately get from your studio. This knowledge will help you to spend the right amount of money on the right stuff. (See Book 1, Chapter 2 and Book 2, Chapter 1 for more on purchasing gear.)

Eyeing the Big Picture


In spite of what you may surmise from this chapter - with its long list of equipment - you need only a few things to do multitrack recording with Pro Tools. This simple list comprises instruments and microphones (called input devices), a computer, a compatible audio interface, Pro Tools software, and monitors (speakers, to you home stereo enthusiasts). No matter how complicated your system becomes and how many pieces of gear you end up accumulating, your studio will still consist of these basic parts.

This chapter breaks down recording systems into the components they have to have, but you may not need to purchase every component separately to get a great-sounding system. Many of these components come bundled together. For example, your audio interface will likely include preamps - or you may find speakers that come with a power amp inside them.

Piping the Music into Pro Tools


As you begin to build your home studio, you'll notice a long list of components - okay, go ahead and call them "extras" - lurking within the Top Five basics of your studio: input devices, computer, interface, software, and monitors. In this section, I focus on these details of input devices so you can understand just what roles they play in your system.

As you get more and more involved in recording, you'll find you can add almost any of these components to your existing system to expand and enhance what you can do.

Interpreting input devices


All your expensive recording gear is useless if you have nothing to plug in to it. This is where the input device comes into play. An input device is, simply, any instrument, microphone, or sound module that produces or delivers a sound to the recorder.

Instruments

An electric guitar, a bass, a synthesizer, and drum machines are typical instruments that plug in to the interface and represent most of the input devices that you use in your studio. A synthesizer and drum machine can plug directly into the Line In inputs of your interface, whereas an electric guitar or a bass needs a direct box (or its equivalent) to plug in to first. (In the case of a Avid interface, you need to use one of the inputs that has a preamp.)

A direct box is an intermediary device that allows you to plug your guitar directly into a mixer without going through your amp first. (For more on direct boxes, see the upcoming section, "Deciphering direct boxes.") Check out Figure 1-1 for an example of an instrument-input device.

FIGURE 1-1: An instrument-input device, which you can plug right into the mixer.

Microphone

You use a microphone (mic) to record the sound of a voice or a purely acoustic instrument - sound sources that, last time I checked, can't be plugged directly into the interface. A microphone converts sound waves into electrical energy that can be understood by the interface. I detail the several types of microphones in Book 3, Chapter 2. Check out Figure 1-2 for a look at a microphone.

FIGURE 1-2: Use a microphone when your instrument can't plug in to the mixer directly.

Sound modules

Sound modules are special kinds of synthesizers and/or drum machines. What makes a sound module different from a regular synthesizer or drum machine is that these contain no triggers or keys that you can play. Instead, sound modules are controlled externally by another synthesizer's keyboard or by a Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) controller (a specialized box designed to control MIDI instruments). Sound modules have MIDI ports (MIDI jacks) to enable you to connect them to other equipment.

Often sound modules are rack-mountable, meaning they have screw holes and mounting ears so you can put them into an audio component rack. Some controllers, however, are not rack-mountable; Figure 1-3, for example, shows a drum module that rests on a stand or tabletop.

FIGURE 1-3: The sound module can be plugged right into the mixer but has to be played by another source.

Deciphering direct boxes


A direct box (or DI box, short for Direct Induction) is used to connect a guitar or bass directly into the mixer without having to run it through an amp first. A direct box's purpose is twofold:

  • To change the guitar's impedance level so that the mixer can create the best sound possible
  • To change the nature of the connection from unbalanced (quarter-inch) to balanced (XLR) so that you can use a long cord without creating electrical noise between instrument and mixer

    For more on cord types as well as balanced versus unbalanced signals, see Book 2, Chapter 1.

For most home recordists, the main purpose of a direct box is to act as an impedance transformer. You're unlikely to need a long run of cords from your guitar to your mixer. Without a direct box changing your impedance levels, your guitar signal may sound thin or have excess noise.

Perusing the preamp


Microphones produce a lower signal level than line-level devices (synthesizers, for example); thus they need to have their signal level increased. For this purpose, you need a preamp, a device that boosts a microphone's output. Preamps can be internal or external, meaning they can reside within your mixer or be a separate unit that you plug in between your microphone and mixer.

The preamp is one of the most crucial elements of a recording system because using one can affect your instrument's sound significantly. Most professional recording studios have a variety of preamps to choose from, and engineers use particular preamps depending upon the type of sound they're trying to capture.

The three basic types of preamps available are solid-state, tube, and hybrid. (You can find out more about preamps in Book 3, Chapter 2.)

Solid-state

Solid-state preamps use transistors to boost the level of the microphone or instrument. Top-quality (expensive) solid-state preamps are generally designed to produce a sound that's clear and accurate (George Massenburg Labs and Crane Song brands, for instance). Solid-state preamps can also be designed to add a pleasing distortion to the music (Neve and Neve-clone preamps, for example). Many recording professionals prefer the clear and accurate sound of a solid-state preamp for acoustic or classical music or any situation where capturing a very natural sound is important. The preamps in nearly all audio interfaces are solid-state. Although not as high in quality as many of the more expensive external preamps, they are certainly serviceable for most purposes and allow you to create top-quality music when you use them correctly. (I show you how to do this in Book 3, Chapter 2.)

Tube

Since the beginning of the digital recording revolution, professionals have complained about the harshness of digital recording. As a result, many digital-recording pros prefer classic tube preamps because they can add warmth to the recording. This "warmth" is actually distortion, albeit a pleasing one. All-tube preamps are generally very expensive, but they're highly sought after among digital recording aficionados because of their sound. Tube preamps work well with music when you want to add color to the sound (that is, not produce an accurate representation of the original source sound). No wonder they show up a lot in rock and blues - and they're great for recording drums. You can also find tube preamps that are clean and open - much like the high-end solid-state preamps that I describe earlier - such as those made by Manley Labs.

Hybrid

A hybrid preamp contains both solid-state and tube components. Most of the inexpensive tube preamps that you find in the marketplace are actually hybrids. (These are also called starved-plate designs because the tubes don't run the same level of voltage as the expensive tube designs.) These types of preamps are usually designed to add the classic tube warmth to your instrument's sound. How much the sound is colored by the tubes - and how pleasing that colored sound is to the listener's ears - will depend upon the quality of the preamp. Most hybrid preamps allow you to dial in the amount of character (pleasing...

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Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat ePUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


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ePUB mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
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