TV White Space Communications and Networks

 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 21. November 2017
  • |
  • 232 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100615-3 (ISBN)
 

TV White Space Communications and Networks summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this important aspect of wireless communication. Part One covers related technologies, while Part Two looks at policy, regulation and standardization issues. Part Three discusses the commercialization and potential applications of white space networks, rounding out a comprehensive book that provides a standard reference for those researching and commercializing white space networks.

  • Presents broad-ranging coverage of all the key issues in white space networks, including regulation, standards, technologies and commercial applications
  • Brings together an international group of experts to summarize the state-of-the-art
  • Builds on the results of the first trials of white space networks
  • Englisch
  • Kent
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 6,92 MB
978-0-08-100615-3 (9780081006153)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • TV White Space Communications and Networks
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • About the Editors
  • 1 TV White Space Developments in the UK
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 What Are TV White Spaces?
  • 1.3 What Does Available Mean?
  • 1.4 Why TV Band Spectrum Is Valued
  • 1.5 Origins of TVWS
  • 1.5.1 A Short History of Terrestrial TV in the United Kingdom
  • 1.6 The UK Road to TV White Spaces Regulation
  • 1.6.1 A Brief Overview of UK Spectrum Regulation
  • 1.6.2 Ofcom's Central Role in UK Spectrum Management
  • 1.6.3 Traditional Spectrum Management Uses Dedicated Allocations and Licensing
  • 1.6.4 Licence Exemption - Assumed Access Permission
  • 1.6.5 International Harmonisation of Spectrum Management
  • 1.6.6 UK TV White Spaces - The Enabling Regulations
  • 1.6.7 Basis of Protection for the Licensed Services
  • 1.6.8 Licence Exemption - The Default Access Model for TV White Spaces
  • 1.6.9 Determining Which Channels Would Be Available
  • Spectrum Sensing
  • Beacons
  • Geolocation Database
  • Ofcom Chose the Geolocation Database Approach
  • Determining the Transmitted Power Limits for White Space Devices
  • Geolocation Databases
  • Manually Con gurable Device Licences - An Interim Measure
  • Regulatory Requirements on Licence-Exempt Devices
  • The United Kingdom's Regulatory Journey Began in 2005/2006
  • 1.7 UK Industry Interest in TVWS Grew in Parallel With Regulatory Discussions
  • 1.7.1 Rural Broadband De cit Was a Driver of Interest in TVWS
  • 1.7.2 Spectrum Scarcity Was Another Driver
  • 1.8 Proving the Value and Workability of TV White Spaces
  • 1.9 TV White Spaces Trial on the Isle of Bute, Scotland (2011 Onwards)
  • 1.10 The Cambridge White Spaces Trial (2011 to 2012)
  • 1.10.1 Improving Broadband in a Rural Location
  • 1.10.2 Machine-to-Machine Communication
  • 1.10.3 Local Content Distribution
  • 1.10.4 Location-Based Services
  • 1.10.5 Input to Regulatory Working Groups
  • 1.11 Ofcom's TV White Spaces Pilot (2013-2014)
  • 1.12 Foundation of the Centre for White Space Communications
  • 1.13 Applying White Spaces: Meeting Challenge of Scottish Rural Coverage
  • 1.14 A Hybrid Access Technology Model Is Needed
  • 1.14.1 Point-to-Multipoint Architectures Can Lower Deployment Costs
  • References
  • Part I Technologies for TV White Space Networks
  • 2 TV White Space Spectrum Sharing Using Geolocation Databases
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Role of a Geolocation Database
  • 2.3 What Is Needed From Organisations Who Are Sharing
  • 2.4 When a Geolocation Database Can Help
  • 2.5 Interfaces of a Geolocation Database
  • 2.6 Current Solutions
  • 2.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Part II Policy, Regulation and Standardisation Issues
  • 3 Indoor-Outdoor TV White and Gray Space Availability: A U.S. Case Study
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.1.1 A Historical Review on TV White Space Ruling in the United States
  • 3.1.2 TV White Space and Grey Space
  • 3.2 Interference Protection in TV Bands
  • 3.2.1 Outdoor White Space
  • 3.2.2 Outdoor Grey Space
  • 3.3 From Outdoor to Indoor WS and GS, and the Impact of Built Environment
  • 3.3.1 Indoor White Space
  • 3.3.2 Indoor Grey Space
  • 3.4 A Case Study in San Francisco
  • 3.4.1 Set-Up
  • 3.4.2 Methodology
  • 3.4.3 Path Loss Models
  • 3.4.3.1 Longley-Rice Irregular Terrain Model
  • 3.4.3.2 Okumura-Hata Model
  • 3.4.3.3 Indoor Path Loss Model
  • 3.4.4 Indoor Versus Outdoor White Space
  • 3.4.4.1 Minimum Separation Distance
  • 3.4.4.2 Indoor White Space Availability
  • 3.4.5 Indoor Versus Outdoor Grey Space
  • 3.4.5.1 Conditions for Rooftop TV Antenna Protection
  • 3.4.5.2 Minimum Separation Distance
  • 3.4.5.3 Indoor Grey Space Availability
  • 3.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • Appendix 3.A FCC Operation Rules
  • References
  • 4 TV White Space Developments in the European Union
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The Status of UHF Band in Europe
  • 4.3 Standardisation Framework in Europe
  • 4.4 Developments With Geolocation Databases
  • 4.5 Extension of the TVWS Concept to Other Bands
  • 4.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • 5 TV White Space Technology for Affordable Internet Connectivity
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Barriers in Connecting Rural India
  • 5.3 TV White Space: A Potential Solution
  • 5.3.1 TV White Space Availability and Usage in India
  • 5.3.2 TV White Space Standards
  • 5.4 A Wireless Broadband Network for Rural India
  • 5.4.1 Technology Requirements in Rural Areas
  • 5.4.2 Rural Broadband Network Architecture
  • 5.4.3 TV White Space Testbed in India
  • 5.5 Regulatory Regimes to Access TV White Space
  • 5.6 Economic Model
  • 5.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • 6 TV White Space Spectrum Administration
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Energy-Aware Resources Management Through an Optimum Data Exchange Scheme
  • 6.2.1 Broker-Based Energy-Ef cient CR Networking Architecture
  • 6.2.2 Algorithms for Ef cient Exploitation of TVWS
  • 6.2.3 Secondary Terminal Resource Exchange, Using Delay-Constrained and Terminal-Aware Energy Model
  • 6.3 Performance Evaluation Analysis, Experimental Results and Discussion
  • 6.3.1 Experimental Test-Bed Description and Technical Speci cations
  • 6.3.2 Simulation Results and Discussion
  • 6.4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Part III Commercialisation and Applications of White Space Networks
  • 7 TV White Space Network Trials
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.1.1 Technical Work in the CEPT/ECC SE43 Group
  • 7.2 WISE - White Space Test Environment for Broadcast Frequencies
  • 7.2.1 Geolocation and PMSE Databases
  • 7.2.2 Radio Environment Mapping Algorithms for the Geolocation Database
  • 7.2.3 Device Emission Class Measurements
  • 7.3 Measurements Contributed to CEPT/ECC SE43
  • 7.3.1 Protection Ratio Measurements in Reference Geometries De ned in ECC Report 159
  • 7.3.1.1 Field Measurements in Outdoor Reference Geometry
  • 7.3.1.2 Field Measurements in Indoor Reference Geometry
  • 7.3.2 PMSE Wireless Microphone Measurements
  • 7.4 Application Pilot Trials
  • 7.4.1 Video Surveillance Trial
  • 7.4.1.1 TVWS Video Surveillance System Set-Up
  • 7.4.1.2 Long-Term Measurements for the TVWS Video Surveillance System
  • 7.4.2 Public Transport Application Pilot Trial
  • 7.4.2.1 Ticket Sales Trial
  • 7.4.2.2 Transit Information Screen Trial
  • 7.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 8 Techno-Economic Evaluation for TV White Spaces
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Method for Techno-Economic Evaluation
  • 8.2.1 Scenario Description
  • 8.2.1.1 Geographical Area and Population
  • 8.2.1.2 System Overview
  • 8.3 Network Infrastructure
  • 8.3.1 Radio Link Budget
  • 8.3.2 Coverage and Capacity Analysis
  • 8.3.3 Required Number of BSs
  • 8.3.4 Core and Transport Network Dimensioning
  • 8.4 Deployment Costs
  • 8.5 Results and Discussion
  • 8.5.1 NPV, CAPEX and OPEX for Deployment Scenarios 1 and 2
  • 8.5.2 Sensitivity Analysis for Deployment Scenarios 1 and 2
  • 8.5.3 NPV, CAPEX and OPEX for Deployment Scenario 3
  • 8.5.4 Sensitivity Analysis for Deployment Scenario 3
  • 8.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • 9 Applications of TV White Space Networks and Cognitive Radio Techniques to Satellite Communications
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Cognitive Radio Techniques in Satellite Communications
  • 9.2.1 Spectrum Sharing Scenarios
  • 9.2.2 Cognitive Radio Techniques
  • 9.2.2.1 Spectrum Sensing
  • 9.2.2.2 Databases
  • 9.2.2.3 Beamforming and Smart Antennas
  • 9.2.2.4 Beam Hopping
  • 9.2.2.5 Frequency and Power Allocations
  • 9.3 Recent Regulatory Approaches
  • 9.4 LSA for Satellite Operators
  • 9.4.1 LSA System Architecture
  • 9.4.2 Important Design Criteria
  • 9.4.3 Example Use Case: C Band (3.6-3.8 GHz)
  • 9.5 Business Aspects
  • 9.6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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