Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation

Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, July 17-21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA
 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 22. Juni 2017
  • |
  • XXI, 1160 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-319-60441-1 (ISBN)
 

This book discusses the latest advances in research and development, design, operation and analysis of transportation systems and their complementary infrastructures. It reports on both theories and case studies on road and rail, aviation and maritime transportation. The book covers a wealth of topics, from accident analysis, vehicle intelligent control, and human-error and safety issues to next-generation transportation systems, model-based design methods, simulation and training techniques, and many more. A special emphasis is given to smart technologies and automation in transport, as well as to user-centered, ergonomic and sustainable design of transport systems. The book, which is based on the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, held on July 17-21, Los Angeles, California, USA, mainly addresses transportation system designers, industrial designers, human-computer interaction researchers, civil and control engineers, as well as vehicle system engineers. Moreover, it represents a timely source of information for transportation policy-makers and social scientists dealing with traffic safety, management, and sustainability issues in transport.

weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Professor of Human Factors in Transport within Engineering and the Environment at the University of Southampton. He is conducting research into improving and optimising human performance in systems, especially with the introduction of new technology and automation. He also analyses accidents and make recommendations for accident prevention in the future

  • Intro
  • Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2017
  • Preface
  • Road and Rail
  • Aviation and Aerospace
  • Maritime
  • Contents
  • Aviation: Human Factors Safety in Aviation and Aerospace
  • Influencing Factors on Error Reporting in Aviation - A Scenario-Based Approach
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Error Reporting and Its Importance for Safety Management in Aviation
  • 2.1 An Integrated Threat Model
  • 2.2 Error Reporting
  • 2.3 Error Reporting as Part of Safety Management
  • 2.4 Hypotheses
  • 3 Materials and Methods
  • 3.1 Sample
  • 3.2 Instrument Development and Pretest
  • 3.3 Variables
  • 3.4 Procedure
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Descriptive Statistics
  • 4.2 Hypothesis Testing
  • 5 Discussion
  • 5.1 Implications for Safety Management and Further Investigations
  • References
  • Quantifying Pilot Contribution to Flight Safety During Hydraulic Systems Failure
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Experiment Design
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Simulator
  • 2.4 Training
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Failure Handling and Flight Path Control
  • 3.2 Checklist Usage
  • 3.3 Diversion Decision
  • 3.4 Workload
  • 3.5 Safety-of-Flight
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Perceptions and Affective Responses to Alternative Risk-Based Airport Security
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Effects of Selection Procedures on Perceptions of Equity and Safety
  • 3 The Effect of Security Automation on Perceptions of Safety and Equity
  • 4 Method
  • 4.1 Procedure
  • 4.2 Experimental Manipulation
  • 4.3 Emotion Elicitation
  • 4.4 Other Dependent Measures
  • 5 Results
  • 5.1 Analytical Approach
  • 5.2 The Experimental Effects on Security Attributes and Affective Responses
  • 5.3 Predicting Shame, Anger, and Decision
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Autonomous Stall Recovery Dynamics as a Prevention Tool for General Aviation Loss of Control
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction: Loss of Control in General Aviation
  • 2 Safety Enhancement via Training and System Knowledge
  • 3 Design Considerations in Aeronautical Autonomous Systems
  • 3.1 Training in Observation
  • 4 Autonomous Stall Recovery System: TRS Mark 2
  • 4.1 Ground Station Data Transfer for Training Purposes
  • 5 Conclusive Remarks
  • References
  • Planning of General Aviation Pilots Using Interviews
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature Review
  • 3 Method
  • 3.1 Participants
  • 3.2 Interview Design
  • 3.3 Analysis of Interview
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • HMIM: A Method to Study the Information and Control Flow Exchange in the Flight Deck
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Definitions
  • 2.1 Definition of HMIM
  • 2.2 Determination of Information Quantity
  • 2.3 Determination of Control Value
  • 3 Case Study
  • 3.1 Apparatus
  • 3.2 Setting
  • 3.3 Participants
  • 3.4 Procedure
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Characteristics of HMIM Sequences
  • 4.2 The Corresponding Vertical Deviations of the Glide Trajectories
  • 4.3 HMIM with NAS-TLX
  • 5 Discussion
  • References
  • Analyzing Positive and Negative Effects of Salience in Air Traffic Control Tasks
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Experimental Condition
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Measurement
  • 3 Experimental Result
  • 3.1 Level of Situation Awareness (SA)
  • 3.2 Instruction Timing
  • 3.3 Performance of Sub Tasks
  • 4 Discussion
  • 4.1 Verification of Hypothesis
  • 4.2 Effects of Salience for Novice Users on the ATC Tasks
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Engine Failure Induced Task Load Transient for Simulation Based Certification Aiding for Aircraft
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusions and Future Work
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • An Analysis of Human Factor Aspects in Operational Fuel Saving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Description of the Questionnaire
  • 2.2 Description of the Simulator Experiment
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Findings of the Online Survey
  • 3.2 Results of the Simulator Experiment
  • 4 Discussion and Implications
  • References
  • Transition from Conventionally to Remotely Piloted Aircraft - Investigation of Possible Impacts on Function Allocation and Information Accessibility Using Cognitive Work Analysis Methods
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Work Domain Analysis (Abstraction Hierarchy)
  • 2.2 Activity and Function Allocation Analysis (SOCA-CAT)
  • 2.3 Analysis of Decision Making and Classification of Information Sources (Decision Ladder)
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Abstraction Hierarchy
  • 3.2 Results of the Analysis of Function Allocation in an Airbus A320 Aircraft
  • 3.3 Results of the Analysis on Decision Making and Classification of Information Sources
  • 3.4 Function Reallocation for a Single Piloted RPA
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Workload and the En Route Controller - An Overblown Issue?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Definitions
  • 3 Why Does Workload Matter?
  • 4 Current Methods for Mitigating Workload
  • 5 Measuring Workload
  • 6 HITL Scenario Design
  • 7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Data-Driven Pilot Behavior Modeling Applied to an Aircraft Offset Landing Task
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Model Development
  • 2.1 Offset Landing Task
  • 2.2 Input and Output Models Considerations
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Model Identification Techniques
  • 3.2 Analysis of the Maneuver
  • 3.3 Reevaluation of the Inputs - Single Landing
  • 3.4 Model Order and Complexity - Single Landing
  • 3.5 Evaluation of Multiple Landings
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Motion and Time Study on Space Maintenance Mission
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Present Study of Motion and Time Study
  • 3 Motion Study on Space Maintenance Mission
  • 4 Time Study on Space Maintenance Mission
  • 4.1 Steps of Time Study on Maintenance Mission
  • 4.2 Calculation Method of Observation Time
  • 5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Air Traffic Controller Additional Work Load as a Result of Aircraft Dynamic Separations
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Achieving Dynamic Wake Separations
  • 3 Air Traffic Controller Workload
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Habitability Issues in Long Duration Space Missions Far from Earth
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Psychological Highlights
  • 2.1 Psychological and Cognitive Issues
  • 2.2 Habitability Issues
  • 2.3 Questionnaire
  • References
  • Maritime
  • Identifying Gaps, Opportunities and User Needs for Future E-navigation Technology and Information Exchange
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Voyage Plans
  • 3.2 Hidden Closest Point of Approach Rules
  • 3.3 Automatic Identification System Information
  • 3.4 Draught
  • 3.5 Shallow Water Contours
  • 3.6 Pilot Scheduling
  • 3.7 Temporary Warnings to Mariners
  • 3.8 VTS Reporting
  • 3.9 Local Weather
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Inshore Navigation's Yacht: Study Cases of Sustainable and Ergonomic Yacht Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Inshore and Inland Slow Mobility in the Abruzzo Region
  • 3 Design Process
  • 4 Guidelines
  • 4.1 ByBoat
  • 4.2 Floating BBQ
  • 4.3 Muse
  • 4.4 Solar B
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • "A-Shaped" Mast Sailing Yacht: Technological Solution for Easy Navigation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Problems of the "Traditional" Sloop Sail Plan
  • 3 "A-Shaped" Mast. Short Description of the State of the Art
  • 4 The Experiment in the Wind Tunnel
  • 5 Case Study (Combination of "A-Shaped" Mast and Canting Keel)
  • 6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Assessing Sonar and Target Motion Analysis Stations in a Submarine Control Room Using Cognitive Work ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Interviews
  • 2.2 Observations
  • 3 Comparison of Abstraction Hierarchies
  • 3.1 Sonar
  • 3.2 TMA
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Visualization in Maritime Navigation: A Critical Review
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Conceptual Model of Maritime Navigation
  • 3 Methodology
  • 4 Results and Discussions
  • 5 Conclusions and Future Work
  • References
  • Gaps Between Users and Designers: A Usability Study About a Tablet-Based Application Used on Ship Br ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Mobile Application Design and Development
  • 3 Method
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Summary and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Driver Safety
  • ATV Safety in Agriculture: Injury, Illness, Analysis and Interventions
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Epidemiology
  • 3 Interventions
  • 4 Future Studies
  • References
  • Study of Spain's Vehicle Fleet Safety Level Based on the Results of Euro NCAP Tests
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Unification of the Database
  • 2.2 Make and Model Matching
  • 2.3 Commercial Name Matching
  • 2.4 Euro NCAP Rating Introduction and Assignation
  • 2.5 Euro NCAP and Vehicle Registration Database Match
  • 2.6 Database Maintenance
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Normalization of Vehicle Registration Database
  • 3.2 Euro NCAP Rating Assignation
  • 3.3 Database Study
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Effects of Actigraphically Acquired Sleep Quality on Driving Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pat ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Sample
  • 2.2 Study Procedures
  • 2.3 Measures
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Integrating Traffic Safety in Vehicle Routing Solution
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature Review
  • 3 Case Study
  • 4 Methodology
  • 4.1 Travel Time Cost Assessment
  • 4.2 Crash Risk Cost Assessment
  • 5 Integrated Travel Cost Function
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Structural Study of the Side Impact Test with a Fully-Instrumented Pole
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Pole Test Regulation
  • 3 Pole Design
  • 4 Construction of the Instrumented Pole
  • 5 Methodology
  • 6 Validation Test and Forces and Energy Analysis
  • 7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Neurobehavioural Evaluation of Rehabilitation Programs for Dangerous Drivers
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Different Learning Conditions and Their Impact on Hazard Perception Training
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Design
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Material
  • 2.4 Procedure
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion and Practical Implications
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Effects of Using a Cell Phone on Gaze Movements During Simulated Car Driving: Hand-Held and Hands-Fr ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Cell Phone Use Distraction on Driving and Traffic Safety
  • 1.2 Gaze Behavior
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Risky Behavior and the Attitudes Towards the Police Safety Operations in the Czech Republic
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Aim and Methods of the Study
  • 3 Sample
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion and Recommendation
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Does the Familiarity of Road Regulation Contribute to Driving Violation? A Simulated Study on Famili ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Individual Factors in Risk-Taking Behaviors
  • 1.2 The Effect of Road Familiarity on Risk-Taking Behavior
  • 1.3 The Present Study
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Familiarity of Road Intersections
  • 2.2 Measurement
  • 2.3 Sample
  • 2.4 Procedure
  • 2.5 Calculation
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Descriptive Statistics
  • 3.2 Explaining Mistakes in Questionnaire and Virtual Driving
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Research on Blinking-Luminescence Travel Support for Visually Impaired Persons
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experiment
  • 2.1 Blinking Pattern
  • 2.2 Experiment Outline
  • 2.3 Experiment Procedure
  • 2.4 Evaluation Method
  • 3 Experiment Result
  • 3.1 Result of Brain Wave Measurement
  • 3.2 Result of Sensory Test
  • 4 Consideration
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • An Emerging Framework to Inform Effective Design of Human-Machine Interfaces for Older Adults Using ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Review Method and Research Questions
  • 3 Emerging Principles
  • 3.1 Leading Generic HMI Design Principles that Could Inform the Development of a CAV in-Vehicle HMI ...
  • 3.2 Aging-Related Impairments that Should Be Considered in Regards to the Usability and Accessibilit ...
  • 3.3 Aging-Related Impairments Should Be Considered in Regards to the Functionality and Adaptability ...
  • 4 Conclusions and Future Directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Human-Machine Interaction
  • Identifying Difference Thresholds of Haptics and Acoustics of Control Devices
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Answer Options
  • 2.2 Transformed Up/Down Method
  • 2.3 Identification of Haptic and Acoustic Parameters
  • 2.4 Experimental Design
  • 2.5 Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Difference Thresholds
  • 3.2 Recommendations Concerning Tolerance Zones
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Digital Touchpoints in Campus Slow Traffic Service System
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Needs for Campus Slow Traffic
  • 2.1 Environmental Requirements
  • 2.2 Object-Oriented Needs
  • 2.3 Social Demands
  • 3 Service System Approach in Campus Slow Traffic
  • 4 Slow Traffic Service System of Jiading Campus
  • 4.1 Existing Problems in Campus Traffic
  • 4.2 User Research
  • 4.3 The Slow Traffic Service System Design
  • 5 Digital Touchpoints in the Service System
  • 5.1 Touchpoints Architecture
  • 5.2 Service-Oriented Landmarks
  • 5.3 Digital Touchpoints in the Three Sub-systems
  • 5.4 Technology Overview
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Cognitive Vehicle Design Guided by Human Factors and Supported by Bayesian Artificial Intelligence
  • Abstract
  • 1 Design Features of the Cognitive Vehicle
  • 2 Issues in Highly Automated Driving and Design Solutions
  • 3 Application of Bayesian Artificial Intelligence
  • 4 In-Vehicle Telematics Issues
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Assessing In-Vehicle Secondary Tasks with the NHTSA Visual-Manual Guidelines Occlusion Method
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Equipment
  • 2.2 Tasks Performed
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Data Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • The Benefit of Touchless Gesture Control: An Empirical Evaluation of Commercial Vehicle-Related Use Cases
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Functions and Use Cases
  • 2.2 Experimental Setup
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Objective and Subjective Data
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Participants
  • 3.2 Analysis of Driving Performance
  • 3.3 Analysis of Interaction Times
  • 3.4 Analysis of Physical Demand and Workload
  • 3.5 Analysis of Perceived Attractiveness and Usefulness
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • How Does Awareness Affect Performance in an Automotive Dual Task Condition?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Background
  • 1.2 What Is an Activity in an Automotive Context?
  • 1.3 Situation Awareness in the Vehicle
  • 2 Study Design
  • 2.1 Experimental Design and Hypothesis
  • 2.2 Equipment and Setup
  • 2.3 Task Design - NRA and DRA
  • 2.4 Dependent Variables
  • 2.5 Participants and Procedure
  • 3 Results and Analysis
  • 3.1 Subjective
  • 3.2 Objective
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Intelligent Driving Interface Layout and Design Research
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Interviews on Layout Preference of Intelligent Driving Vehicles
  • 2.1 Interview Topics
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Interview
  • 2.4 Interview Findings
  • 3 Preference Studies on Layout of Intelligent Diving Cars
  • 3.1 Experiment Scheme
  • 3.2 Materials
  • 3.3 Participants
  • 3.4 Experiment Process
  • 3.5 Findings
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Human-Machine Interface Design Development for Connected and Cooperative Vehicle Features
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Materials
  • 2.3 Experimental Design and Procedure
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Emergency Electronic Brake Lights (EEBL)
  • 3.2 Emergency Vehicle Warning (EVW)
  • 3.3 Traffic Condition Warning and Road Works Warning (TCW, RWW)
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • How Does Eye-Gaze Relate to Gesture Movement in an Automotive Pointing Task?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Background
  • 3 Method
  • 3.1 Experimental Set-up and Logged Data
  • 3.2 Graphical User Interface
  • 3.3 Participants
  • 3.4 Driving Conditions and Procedure
  • 3.5 Considered Measures
  • 4 Results and Discussion
  • 5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Determination of Auditory Stimuli for the Auditory Variant of the Detection Response Task Method
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Work
  • 3 Methods
  • 3.1 Cognitive Task
  • 3.2 Auditory DRT Stimuli
  • 3.3 Design
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Perceptions Towards the Use of Intelligent Transport System Technologies by Earthquake Victims
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Sampling Method and Data Collection
  • 3 Multinomial Logistic Regression (MNLR) Analysis approach
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Interpretation of Results
  • 6 Discussion
  • 7 Conclusions
  • 8 Application of the Work
  • 9 Future Directions
  • References
  • Blind Driving by Means of a Steering-Based Predictor Algorithm
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Apparatus
  • 2.2 Track
  • 2.3 Participants
  • 2.4 Speed and Gearbox Settings
  • 2.5 New Algorithm for Issuing Feedback
  • 2.6 Experiment Design
  • 2.7 Dependent Variables
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Using Interior Design Principles to Improve the User's Perception of Vehicle Interiors: A Study on Visual Parameters
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Test Vehicles
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Visual Parameters
  • 2.4 Kansei Engineering
  • 2.5 Visual Parameter Evaluation
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Identified Visual Parameters
  • 3.2 Comfort, Cohesiveness and Spaciousness
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Possibility of Automobile Seat Evaluation with Seat Fidgets and Movements
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Material and Method
  • 2.1 Experimental Outline
  • 2.2 Test Seats
  • 2.3 Evaluation Method
  • 2.4 Participants
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Vibration Acceleration
  • 3.2 Discomfort Rating
  • 3.3 SFMs
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • A Study on the Relationship Between Passengers' Visual Searching Efficiency in Bus-Waiting Process a ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Researching Methods
  • 2.1 Optimization of Bus Face Design
  • 2.2 The Design of Experimental Scene
  • 2.3 Experimental Subjects
  • 2.4 Experimental Equipment
  • 2.5 Experimental Procedure
  • 3 Data Analysis
  • 3.1 Layout Analysis
  • 3.2 Text Color Analysis
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Vision and Driving Support for Shielded Vehicles - Implementation and Test of an Electronic Vision R ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Background
  • 1.2 Vision Replacement
  • 2 Camera-Monitor System Implementation
  • 2.1 Panorama Stitching
  • 2.2 Augmentation
  • 3 Vehicle Platform and Installation
  • 4 Evaluation Process
  • 5 Results
  • 5.1 Sample
  • 5.2 Results from Questionnaires and Interviews
  • 5.3 Eye Tracking (DL)
  • 6 Discussion
  • References
  • Measuring the Cognitive Demands of In-vehicle Dashboard and Centre Console Tasks
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Driving Simulation
  • 2.2 Subjective Review
  • 2.3 Participants
  • 3 Analysis Method
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Cognitive Load Assessment of Tractor Driver Based on Cognitive Task Workload Model
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Investigation
  • 4 Analysis
  • 4.1 Task Analysis
  • 4.2 Analysis of Time Occupied
  • 4.3 Analysis of Level of Action Load and Action-Set Switching
  • 5 Experiment
  • 5.1 Experiment Equipment
  • 5.2 Pulping Operation
  • 5.3 Pulping Operation vs. Seeding Operation
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Automation
  • A Review of Non-driving-related Tasks Used in Studies on Automated Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Overview of Non-driving-related Tasks
  • 3 Takeover Process Model
  • 4 Outlook
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Driverless Pods: From Technology Demonstrators to Desirable Mobility Solutions
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Kano Model
  • 3 Comfort Model
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Testing Scenarios for Human Factors Research in Level 3 Automated Vehicles
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Driver in a Level 3 Automated Vehicle
  • 3 Testing Scenarios in Human Factors Research
  • 4 Taxonomy of Testing Scenarios
  • 5 Recommended Testing Scenarios
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Autonomous Vehicles: Reliability of Their Perception of the World Around Them and the Role of Human ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Levels of Technological Advances
  • 3 Issues of Accuracy and Reliability
  • 4 The Cognitive Vehicles
  • 5 Bayesian Artificial Intelligence
  • 6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Connecting Rural Road Design to Automated Vehicles: The Concept of Safe Speed to Overcome Human Errors
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 AVs and Road Design/Safety
  • 2.1 Driving Automation in the Future
  • 2.2 The Influence on Road Safety
  • 2.3 Different Scenarios for Road Design and Operation
  • 2.4 AVs and Tire-Road Friction Estimation
  • 3 The Safe Speed
  • 3.1 The Friction Diagram Method
  • 3.2 The Safe Speed in the Traditional Design
  • 3.3 The Safe Speed for the Autonomous Vehicle
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • A Longitudinal Simulator Study to Explore Drivers' Behaviour During Highly-Automated Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Automation
  • 1.2 Overview of Methodological Approach
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Activities and Artefacts
  • 3.2 Posture
  • 3.3 Trust and Situation Awareness
  • 3.4 Further Considerations
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Understanding and Applying the Concept of "Driver Availability" in Automated Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Take-Over Process Model and Terminologies
  • 3 The Concept of Driver Availability
  • 4 Modelling Driver Availability
  • 4.1 Modeling Framework
  • 4.2 Assessing the Current Driver State by Drive State Monitoring
  • 4.3 Predicting the Target Driver State
  • 5 Applications
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • What to Expect of Automated Driving: Expectations and Anticipation of System Behavior
  • Abstract
  • 1 User Centered Research for New In-Vehicle Technology
  • 2 Understanding Expectations
  • 2.1 Method
  • 2.2 Results
  • 3 Initial Information and Degree of Freedom
  • 3.1 Method
  • 3.2 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • The Design of a Vibrotactile Seat for Conveying Take-Over Requests in Automated Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Conditionally Automated Driving and the Take-Over Process
  • 1.2 Vibrotactile Displays in Conditionally Automated Driving
  • 1.3 Use Cases of a Vibrotactile Seat in Conditionally Automated Driving
  • 1.4 Aim of This Study
  • 2 Design of the Vibrotactile Seat
  • 2.1 Requirements of the Vibrotactile Seat
  • 2.2 Signal Architecture
  • 2.3 Hardware
  • 2.4 Participants
  • 2.5 Apparatus
  • 2.6 Procedure
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Learning from the Best - Naturalistic Arbitration for Cooperative Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction and Theoretical Background
  • 2 Methodology
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Action Intentions
  • 3.2 Conflict Concerning Direction of Movement
  • 3.3 Conflict Concerning Velocity of Movement
  • 3.4 Interaction Resources
  • 4 Transfer to Automated Vehicles and Cooperative Driving
  • 4.1 Use Cases of Cooperative Driving
  • 4.2 Exemplary Interaction Pattern for Arbitration
  • 5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Modelling the Dynamics of Driver Situation Awareness in Automated Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Dynamics of Building Situation Awareness
  • 2.1 Model Architecture
  • 2.2 Model Verification
  • 3 SA Real-Time Monitoring with Eye-Tracking Data
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Evaluation of an Autonomous Vehicle External Communication System Concept: A Survey Study
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Intention Indicator
  • 2.2 Survey Design
  • 2.3 Participants
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Demographics
  • 3.2 Concept Identification
  • 3.3 Concept Comparison
  • 4 Conclusion and Discussion
  • References
  • Machine Learning and Big Data Analytics in Support of Fleet Safety During Severe Weather
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Idaho National Laboratory Mission Support Services
  • 3 Near-Real Time Weather Forecasting
  • 3.1 Increased Resolution
  • 3.2 Increased Accessibility
  • 3.3 Driver Benefit
  • 3.4 Communication Technology
  • 4 Method
  • 5 Research Goals
  • 6 Summary and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • A Study on the Human and the Automation in Automated Driving: Getting to Know Each Other
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Automated and Cooperative Driving
  • 2.1 Vehicle Guidance
  • 2.2 Levels of Assistance and Automation
  • 2.3 Cooperative Guidance and Control
  • 3 Addressed Use Cases and Experimental Data
  • 3.1 Driving Situation
  • 3.2 Experimental Data
  • 4 Assessing the Driver's Intention Using Neural Networks
  • 4.1 Theoretical Background
  • 4.2 A Neural Network for Cooperative Guidance and Control
  • 4.3 Finding an Optimal Network
  • 5 Results
  • 6 Discussion and Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • How Automation Level and System Reliability Influence Driver Performance in a Cut-In Situation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Experimental Setup and Realization
  • 2.2 Hypothesis and Parameters
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Looking at Drivers and Passengers to Inform Automated Driver State Monitoring of In and Out of the Loop
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Driving Route
  • 2.3 Procedures
  • 2.4 Apparatus
  • 2.5 Eye-Tracking Data Measurement/Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Saccade Amplitude
  • 3.2 Eye Blinks
  • 3.3 Eccentricity
  • 4 Discussion/Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Taxonomy of Traffic Situations for the Interaction between Automated Vehicles and Human Road Users
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Communication
  • 2.1 Explicit Communication
  • 2.2 Implicit Communication
  • 3 Approaches to Cluster Traffic Situations
  • 4 Taxonomy of Traffic Situations for the Interaction between Automated Vehicles and Human Road Users
  • 5 Application
  • 6 Limitations
  • 7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Effect of Warning Levels on Drivers' Decision-Making with the Self-driving Vehicle System
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Experiment Design
  • 2.3 Experiment Equipment
  • 2.4 Experiment Procedures
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 The Non-takeover Rate
  • 3.2 The Average Decision Time
  • 3.3 The Average Speed
  • 3.4 The Lateral Offset
  • 4 Summary and Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Does Shifting Between Conditionally and Partially Automated Driving Lead to a Loss of Mode Awareness?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods and Apparatus
  • 2.1 Simulation and Vehicle Automation
  • 2.2 Non-driving-Related Tasks
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Human-Machine Interface
  • 2.5 Dependent and Independent Variables
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 4.1 Effect of Mode Transition on Mode Awareness
  • 4.2 Effect of Different HMI Concepts on Mode Awareness
  • 5 Summary
  • References
  • Information Expectations in Highly and Fully Automated Vehicles
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Study Design
  • 2.3 Facilities and Traffic Scenarios
  • 2.4 Measures
  • 2.5 Procedure and Participant Instructions
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Obtaining Design Requirements from the Public Understanding of Driverless Technology
  • Abstract
  • 1 Background and Motivation
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Semi-structured Interviews
  • 2.2 Two Focus Groups
  • 2.3 The Interpreted Outcomes Analysis
  • 2.4 The Concepts and Requirements Insights
  • 3 Discussion and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Manual Takeover and Handover of a Simulated Fully Autonomous Vehicle Within Urban and Extra-Urban Se ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Implications
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Infrastructure and Road Safety
  • Driving Performance, Adaptation, and Cognitive Workload Costs of Logo Panel Detection as Mediated by ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Aging and Driving
  • 1.2 Motivation
  • 1.3 Hypotheses
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Prior Study
  • 2.2 Apparatus
  • 2.3 Participants
  • 2.4 Experimental Design
  • 2.5 Procedures
  • 2.6 Statistical Data Analyses
  • 3 Result
  • 3.1 Adaptation Behavior
  • 3.2 Driving Performance
  • 3.3 Cognitive Workload
  • 3.4 Correlation Analysis
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Comparison Between Young Male Drivers' Self-assessed and Objectively Measured Driving Skills
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Equipment and Materials
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Data Preparation and Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Identification of Criteria for Drivers' State Detection
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction and Theoretical Background
  • 2 Possible Drivers' States
  • 2.1 Definition of Involvement Levels
  • 2.2 Definition of Minimal Requirements for Drivers' Involvement
  • 3 Criteria for Drivers' State Detection
  • 3.1 Initial Experimental Study
  • 4 Summary and Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • A Real Case-Based Study Exploring Influence of Human Age and Gender on Drivers' Behavior and Traffic Safety
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Proposed Methodology
  • 3 Survey Results Description
  • 3.1 Demographics of Participants
  • 3.2 Driving Behaviors Analysis
  • 3.3 Crash History Analysis
  • 4 Results and Discussion
  • 4.1 Driving Behavior Versus Gender
  • 4.2 Driving Behavior Versus Age
  • 4.3 Correlation Analysis: Driving Behavior Versus Injury Severity
  • 4.4 Correlation Analysis: Driving Behavior Versus Car Damage Severity
  • 5 Implications and Conclusion
  • References
  • Verification of Installed Position of LED Block Equipped with Projections to Indicate Travel Direction
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experiment Conditions
  • 2.1 LED Block with Direction Location
  • 2.2 Experiment Method
  • 2.3 Experiment Procedure
  • 3 Experiment Result
  • 4 Considerations
  • 5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Do End Users Really Have a Place in the Design Arena When Safe Design Is Critical?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 End-User Participation
  • 3.2 The End-User Contribution
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Seat Belts Unfastened: Non-seat Belt Use in the Czech Republic
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Design
  • 2.2 Methods
  • 2.3 Sample
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Descriptive Statistics
  • 3.2 Model Predicting Non-seat Belt Use
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • The Effect of See-Through Truck on Driver Monitoring Patterns and Responses to Critical Events in Truck Platooning
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Apparatus
  • 2.3 Two-Truck Platooning System
  • 2.4 Experimental Design and Test Procedure
  • 2.5 Dependent Variables
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Gaze Behavior
  • 3.2 Response to the Critical Event
  • 4 Conclusion and Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Vulnerable Road Users
  • Driver-Cyclist Interaction Under Different Bicycle Crossroad Configurations
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Road Scenario
  • 2.2 Apparatus
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 Participants
  • 3 Data Processing
  • 4 Data Analysis and Results
  • 4.1 Drivers' Initial Speed
  • 4.2 Distance from the Bicycle Crossroad Where the Yielding Maneuver Begins
  • 4.3 Drivers' Minimum Speed
  • 4.4 Distance from the Bicycle Crossroad Where the Yielding Maneuver Ends
  • 4.5 Average Deceleration Rate
  • 4.6 Outcomes of the Questionnaire
  • 5 Discussion
  • 5.1 Effects of the Countermeasures
  • 5.2 Effects of the Cyclist Condition
  • 6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Operational and Safety Analysis of Signage and Pavement Marking Treatments in Puerto Rico Dynamic Toll Lane Using a Driving Simulator
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Objective
  • 3 Hypothesis
  • 4 Methodology
  • 4.1 Literature Review
  • 4.2 Experimental Design
  • 4.3 Development of Scenarios
  • 4.4 Subject Drivers
  • 4.5 Data Collection
  • 4.6 Analysis of Results
  • 4.7 Conclusions
  • 4.8 Future Work
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Is the Driving Behaviour of Young Novices and Young Experienced Drivers Under Alcohol Linked to Their Perceived Effort and Alertness?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experimental Protocol
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Effect of Alcohol
  • 3.2 Effect of Experience
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Injury Severity Analysis in Vehicle-Pedestrian Crashes
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Prior Studies on Vehicle-Pedestrian Crash Injury Severity
  • 3 Data Description
  • 4 Injury Severity Analysis
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Driving Simulation and Test Track
  • Motion Sickness Measurements for Young Male Adults in Vitality, Endurance, Profiles and Sensitivity
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Subjects
  • 2.2 Procedure
  • 2.3 Equipment
  • 2.4 Statistical Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Modeling the Real World Using STISIM Drive® Simulation Software: A Study Contrasting High and Low Lo ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experimental Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Equipment
  • 2.3 Questionnaires
  • 2.4 Procedure
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Immersion and Presence
  • 3.2 Workload
  • 3.3 Speed Profiles
  • 3.4 Lessons Learnt and Future Work
  • 3.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • What Driving Abilities Do Racing Video Games Stimulate? Rating the Levels of Realism Experienced in Commercial Racing Video Games
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Rating the Driving Experience
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Sample
  • 2.2 Driving Experience Analysis - Rating Grid (DEA-RG)
  • 2.3 Calculation
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Environmental Realism
  • 3.2 Driving Realism
  • 3.3 Accident Realism
  • 3.4 Overall Driving Experience Realism
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Multivariate Differences in Driver Workload: Test Track Versus On-Road Driving
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Factor Analysis
  • 2.1 Hidden Structure - On Road Data
  • 2.2 Hidden Structure - Test Track Data
  • 3 Driver Workload: Test Track Versus On-Road Driving
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Eco-Driving
  • Range Makes All the Difference? Weighing up Range, Charging Time and Fast-Charging Network Density as Key Drivers for the Acceptance of Battery Electric Vehicles
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Work and Questions Addressed
  • 3 Methodology
  • 3.1 Questionnaire Design and Conjoint Analysis
  • 3.2 Data Acquisition and Analysis
  • 3.3 Sample
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Relative Importance of Charging Network Attributes
  • 4.2 Choice Simulations
  • 4.3 BEV Experience
  • 5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • 6 Limitations and Further Research
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Fast-Charging Stations or Conventional Gas Stations: Same Difference? - Variations of Preferences and Requirements
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Questions Addressed
  • 3 Methodology
  • 3.1 Questionnaire Design
  • 3.2 Data Acquisition, Preparation and Analysis
  • 4 Sample
  • 5 Results
  • 5.1 Contrasting Gas Stations and Charging Stations
  • 5.2 Requirements on Fast-Charging Stations
  • 6 Discussion and Conclusion
  • 7 Limitations and Outlook
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Fuzzy Logic Based Merging Gap Acceptance Model Incorporating Driving Styles and Drivers' Personalities
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Fuzzy Logic Based Model with Drivers' Personalities
  • 3 Model Calibration and Validation
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Rail Passengers
  • Providing Improved Crowding Information to Provide Benefits for Rail Passengers and Operators
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology: Stated Preference Surveys
  • 3 Analysis of Stated Preference Surveys
  • 3.1 Willingness to Wait for a Later Train
  • 3.2 Carriage Choice
  • 4 Use of Data to Provide Crowding Information
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • User Experience Evaluation on Ticket Gage of Subway Station: A Repertory Grid Approach
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Background
  • 3 Methods
  • 3.1 An Overview of User Experience Evaluation Methods
  • 3.2 Repertory Grid Technique (RGT)
  • 3.3 An Example Study Using RGT: User Experience Evaluation on Ticket Gate of Subway Station
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Elements Selection
  • 4.2 Constructs Elicitation
  • 4.3 Analysis of Repertory Grid Data
  • 4.4 Interpretations and Presentation of the Result
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • A Study on Quantitative Evaluation of Relationship Between Longitudinal Shock and Ride Comfort by Tr ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Background
  • 1.2 Purpose
  • 1.3 Study Structure
  • 2 Analysis of Braking Patterns
  • 3 Construction of an Evaluation Method
  • 3.1 Experiment I: Evaluation of One-Step Braking
  • 3.2 Experiment II: Evaluation of the Three Stages of Various Braking Patterns
  • 3.3 Study of an Evaluation Method Based on an Ordinal Scale, for All 40 Braking Patterns
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Guidelines for Electronic Systems Designed for Aiding the Visually Impaired People in Metro Networks
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Previous Work
  • 4 Development
  • 5 Results
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Public Transport
  • A Comparison of Auditory and Visual in-Vehicle Stop Signals in Philippine Public Road-Based Transportation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Background of the Study
  • 1.2 Rationale
  • 2 Problem Statement
  • 3 Review of Related Literature
  • 3.1 Sources of Distraction and Signal Perception
  • 3.2 Auditory Displays and the Design of an Alarm Signal
  • 3.3 Visual Displays and Light
  • 4 Methodology
  • 4.1 Determination of Signals
  • 4.2 Participants
  • 4.3 Set-up and Calibration
  • 4.4 Procedure
  • 4.5 Summary and Analysis of Data
  • 5 Results and Discussion
  • 5.1 Significance of the Type of Signal
  • 5.2 Pairwise Comparisons
  • 6 Conclusion
  • 7 Areas for Further Study
  • References
  • Measuring Mobility and Transport Services: The METPEX Project
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Background
  • 3 Metpex
  • 3.1 Method
  • 3.2 Higher Level Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • From Task Analysis to Innovation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Physical and Cognitive Tasks
  • 3 Technical Solution vs Acceptable Workload
  • 4 Solution Design
  • 5 Tests with Drivers
  • 5.1 Methodology
  • 5.2 Head-Up Display with Speed
  • 5.3 Head-Up Display with Speed and Eco-Drive Information
  • 6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Driving Automation and Human Factors Issues
  • Three Driver and Operator Behaviour Models in the Context of Automated Driving - Identification of Issues from Human Actor Perspective
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Human Behavioral Models
  • 2.1 Motivational Theories
  • 2.2 The Human as the Information Processor
  • 2.3 Practice Theory Approach and Core Task Model
  • 3 Method
  • 3.1 Procedure
  • 3.2 Definition of Automation Scenarios and Use Cases
  • 4 Findings of Human Issues in Automated Driving
  • 4.1 Summary - A List of Issues Identified
  • 5 Discussions
  • 6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • The Right Moment for Braking as Informal Communication Signal Between Automated Vehicles and Pedestrians in Crossing Situations
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Older Drivers and Driving Automation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Road Transport System and the Older Driver
  • 2.1 The Road Transport System as a Safety Critical System
  • 2.2 Older Drivers
  • 3 Autonomous Vehicles and Driving Automation
  • 3.1 The Long Run Towards Driving Automation
  • 3.2 Levels of Automation
  • 3.3 The Older Driver and Driving Automation
  • 4 Final Remarks
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Rail Safety and Design
  • A Comparison of Three Systemic Accident Analysis Methods Using 46 SPAD (Signals Passed at Danger) Incidents
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Objectives
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Incident Factor Classification System
  • 3.2 AcciMap
  • 3.3 Human Factors Analysis and Classification System
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Understanding Railway Employees' Perceptions of Senior Managers' Safety Commitment
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Unique Influence of Senior Managers
  • 3 Signaling Theory
  • 4 Method
  • 4.1 Participants
  • 4.2 Materials and Measures
  • 4.3 Procedure
  • 4.4 Qualitative Analysis
  • 5 Results
  • 5.1 Themes
  • 6 Discussion
  • 6.1 Study Purpose
  • 6.2 Answering the Research Question
  • 6.3 Practical Implications
  • 6.4 Study Limitations and Conclusion
  • References
  • Proposal of Ergonomic Intervention in Horizontal Traffic Signaling
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Cognitive Ergonomics and Traffic Signs
  • 1.2 The Anamorphosis - Definition and Constructive Principles
  • 2 Development and Results
  • 3 Conclusion
  • References
  • Road and Rail: Transportation Logistics
  • Collective Cars in Cities: Optimal Management in Real Time Through DES Approach
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 System Approach - Study Scope
  • 3 Building Data
  • 4 Performance Measurement
  • 4.1 Network Statistics
  • 4.2 Client Waiting Time
  • 4.3 Client Abandonment Rate
  • 4.4 Quality of Service
  • 4.5 Vehicle Occupancy
  • 4.6 Vehicle Activity
  • 5 Discussion-Future Work
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Human Factors in the Design of Automated Transport Logistics
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Work
  • 2.1 Technology Acceptance Models
  • 2.2 Learnings from Human Factors Engineering
  • 3 Eliciting Relevant Automated Transport Logistics Scenarios
  • 3.1 Exploring the Field in a World Café Setting
  • 3.2 Detailing Scenarios in Semi-Structured Interviews
  • 4 Examining the Role of Technology Acceptance Within the Gained Transportation Logistics Scenarios
  • 4.1 Technology Acceptance Aspects Discussed Within the World Café
  • 4.2 Technology Acceptance Aspects Observed in the Interviews
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Erratum to: Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation
  • Erratum to: N.A. Stanton (ed.), Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation, Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing 597, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-60441-1
  • Author Index

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