Advances in Agronomy

 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Februar 2019
  • |
  • 308 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-817407-4 (ISBN)
 

Advances in Agronomy, Volume 154 continues the legacy of this leading series and first-rate source for the latest research in agronomy. Each volume contains an eclectic group of reviews by leading scientists throughout the world. As always, the subjects covered are rich, varied and exemplary of the abundant subject matter addressed by this long-running serial. Chapters in this updated volume include

Experiments, Uptake Mechanisms and Functioning of Si foliar fertilization - A Review Focusing on Maize, Rice and Wheat, Pre-drought Priming: A Key Drought Tolerance Engine in Support of Grain Development in Wheat, Bio-Waste Management in Sub-Tropical Soils of India, and more.

  • Includes numerous, timely, state-of-the-art reviews on the latest advancements in agronomy
  • Features distinguished, well recognized authors from around the world
  • Builds upon this venerable and iconic review series
  • Covers the extensive variety and breadth of subject matter in the crop and soil sciences
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 18,70 MB
978-0-12-817407-4 (9780128174074)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Advances in Agronomy
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Genesis of seleniferous soils and associated animal and human health problems
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Selenium: A toxic element and an essential nutrient
  • 3. Selenium geochemistry
  • 3.1. Selenium in magmatic (igneous) rocks
  • 3.2. Selenium in metamorphic and sedimentary rocks
  • 4. Genesis of seleniferous soils
  • 4.1. Weathering of rocks and minerals
  • 4.2. Impact of climate
  • 4.3. Topographical features
  • 4.4. Anthropogenic activities
  • 4.4.1. Metal-processing industries
  • 4.4.2. Selenium-based industries
  • 4.4.3. Burning of fossil fuels
  • 4.4.4. Inorganic and organic fertilizer inputs
  • 4.4.5. Sewage sludge
  • 4.4.6. Agricultural use of selenium as an insecticide
  • 4.4.7. Se-contaminated underground water
  • 5. Distribution of seleniferous soils in the world
  • 5.1. United States of America
  • 5.2. Canada
  • 5.3. Mexico
  • 5.4. India
  • 5.5. Colombia
  • 5.6. Ireland and England
  • 5.7. Australia
  • 5.8. Israel
  • 5.9. China
  • 5.10. South Korea
  • 5.11. Iran
  • 6. Selenium in the environment, food, and human/animal tissues
  • 6.1. Selenium in soils
  • 6.2. Selenium in water bodies
  • 6.3. Selenium in food products commonly consumed by humans
  • 6.4. Daily dietary selenium intake
  • 6.5. Selenium in human/animal tissues
  • 7. Seleniferous soils and health implications for plants, animals, and humans
  • 7.1. Plants
  • 7.2. Animals
  • 7.3. Birds
  • 7.4. Humans
  • 8. Conclusions and future research needs
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Research and innovation priorities as defined by the Ecophyto plan to address current crop protection transf ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Thematic area I: Pest monitoring-From observation to decision-making
  • 2.1. Optimizing and enhancing the pest monitoring system
  • 2.2. From pest risk assessment to decision-making
  • 2.3. Broadening the scope of monitoring
  • 2.3.1. Weeds
  • 2.3.2. Beneficial organisms
  • 2.3.3. Unintended effects on functional biodiversity
  • 3. Thematic area II: Designing and developing IPM solutions for crop protection
  • 3.1. Formalizing and illustrating the design of IPM approaches
  • 3.2. Filling knowledge gaps and producing the references necessary for establishing decision trees for IPM
  • 3.3. Developing agro-ecological modeling tailored to the design of IPM strategies
  • 3.4. Making better use of existing experimental facilities and developing a new generation of experiments, surveys and ob ...
  • 3.5. Understanding the implications and impacts of IPM at the farm scale
  • 4. Thematic area III: Diversification of control methods and limitation of phytosanitary inputs
  • 4.1. Cultivated genetic material, seeds and plants
  • 4.1.1. Integrating the use of new species in crops
  • 4.1.2. Identification of new levers related to plants to limit phytosanitary inputs
  • 4.1.3. Identifying new ways for the deployment and combination of these species and their varietal traits
  • 4.2. Biocontrol
  • 4.2.1. Diversifying and improving the biocontrol offer
  • 4.2.2. Improving the reliability of biocontrol solutions through the evaluation of their performances and their unintende ...
  • 4.2.3. Developing IPM strategies with an enhanced use of biocontrol
  • 4.2.4. Facilitating and encouraging farmers´ adoption of biocontrol
  • 4.3. Developing and combining tools for precision agriculture
  • 5. Thematic area IV: Ensuring the sustainable efficacy of protection methods and the robustness of cropping systems with ...
  • 5.1. Sustainable management to prevent the circumvention of control methods
  • 5.1.1. Designing and managing varietal resistance with sustainability as the objective
  • 5.1.2. Prevention of pesticide resistance linked to changes in chemical control
  • 5.1.3. Sustainable management of biological controls and agronomic practices
  • 5.1.4. The rationale for IPM with the aim of sustainable efficacy
  • 5.2. Monitoring and predicting changes in pest populations
  • 5.2.1. Rapid identification methods to improve monitoring of pest emergence
  • 5.2.2. Intervention strategies made possible by real-time detection of pest emergence
  • 5.2.3. Characterization of the risks of new pests becoming established
  • 5.3. Promoting arbitration in favor of sustainability
  • 6. Thematic area V: Socio-economic dimensions of transitions to crop protection more frugal in pesticide use-Changes in p ...
  • 6.1. The farmer inscribed in a trajectory of changing practices
  • 6.2. The dynamics of co-innovation and the role of networks
  • 6.3. The functioning of the socio-technical system and possibilities for change
  • 6.4. Territorial scale
  • 6.5. Non-agricultural issues
  • 6.6. Transition processes and modes of governance
  • 7. Thematic area VI: Public policy incentive schemes and their mobilization to encourage farmers to reduce pesticide use
  • 7.1. The articulation between public policy incentives to reduce pesticide use and other policies
  • 7.2. The construction of innovative agro-environmental contracts
  • 7.3. Advice and support for transition
  • 7.4. Public policy evaluation and experimentation
  • 8. Thematic area VII: From use to impacts-Indicators
  • 8.1. Reminder of the general framework and the current situation with regard to Ecophyto
  • 8.2. Identification and prioritization of research needs
  • 9. Thematic area VIII: Exposure to chemical PPPs and effects on human health
  • 9.1. Evaluation of epidemiological surveillance tools/systems for exposed populations and development of research using t ...
  • 9.2. Estimating health risks for occupationally exposed populations
  • 9.3. Producing data on exposure of people working in agriculture, in real-life situations involving the use of chemical PPPs
  • 9.4. Developing and evaluating preventive actions which reduce exposure
  • 10. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Uncertainties in soil physicochemical factors controlling phosphorus mineralization and immobilization pro ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The phosphorus cycle
  • 3. Mineralization and immobilization of phosphorus
  • 4. General factors influencing phosphorus mineralization and immobilization
  • 4.1. Temperature
  • 4.2. Moisture and aeration
  • 4.3. Soil pH
  • 4.4. Soil parent material and order
  • 4.5. Nitrogen-phosphorus dynamics
  • 5. Effects of environmental systems on phosphorus biogeochemistry
  • 5.1. Forest systems
  • 5.1.1. Microbial biomass
  • 5.1.2. Phosphatase activity
  • 5.1.3. Vegetation type
  • 5.1.4. C:P ratio
  • 5.1.5. Intensity of management
  • 5.2. Agricultural systems
  • 5.2.1. Microbial biomass
  • 5.2.2. Phosphatase activity
  • 5.2.3. Vegetation type
  • 5.2.4. C:P ratio
  • 5.2.5. Intensity of management
  • 5.3. Other environmental systems
  • 5.3.1. Microbial biomass
  • 5.3.2. Phosphatase activity
  • 5.3.3. Vegetation type
  • 5.3.4. C:P ratio
  • 5.3.5. Intensity of management
  • 6. Summary and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter Four: Seasonal crop yield forecast: Methods, applications, and accuracies
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. A description of seasonal yield forecast methods
  • 2.1. Surveys
  • 2.2. Statistical models
  • 2.2.1. Statistical models using agrometeorological data
  • 2.2.2. Seasonal forecast based on statistical models using remote sensing data
  • 2.3. Use of crop simulation models in crop yield forecasts
  • 2.3.1. Direct use of remote sensing data to initialize model or to force simulated LAI development
  • 2.3.2. Updating of state variables
  • 2.3.3. Reinitialization of the model
  • 2.3.4. Re-calibration of the model
  • 2.3.5. Model inversion to derive biophysical parameters
  • 3. Discussions
  • 3.1. Geographies of yield forecast applications
  • 3.2. Accuracy of the methods
  • 3.3. Advantages and limitations of the methods
  • 3.4. Key components of an improved yield forecasting system
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Ditch-buried straw return: A novel tillage practice combined with tillage rotation and deep ploughing in ri ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Rice-wheat rotation systems
  • 1.2. Tillage-related issues
  • 1.3. Straw residue-related issues
  • 1.4. Ditch-buried straw return
  • 2. Straw incorporation capability
  • 3. Soil physical processes
  • 3.1. Soil structure
  • 3.2. Soil water
  • 3.3. Soil temperature
  • 4. Soil carbon sequestration and emission
  • 4.1. Straw-remained carbon
  • 4.2. Soil organic carbon
  • 4.3. Machinery energy consumption
  • 4.4. Greenhouse gas emission
  • 5. Soil nutrient
  • 5.1. Nitrogen
  • 5.2. Phosphorus
  • 5.3. Potassium
  • 6. Soil microbial processes
  • 6.1. Soil enzymatic activity
  • 6.2. Glomalin-related soil protein
  • 6.3. Soil microbial activity and respiration
  • 6.4. Soil microbial community
  • 7. Pest and disease control
  • 8. Agronomic traits
  • 8.1. Seedling establishment and growth
  • 8.2. Grain productivity
  • 9. Future direction
  • 10. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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