Advances in Agronomy

 
 
Elsevier Book Series (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 8. August 2016
  • |
  • 296 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-805171-9 (ISBN)
 

Advances in Agronomy continues its reputation as a leading reference and first-rate source for the latest research in agronomy. Each volume contains an eclectic group of reviews by leading scientists throughout the world.

Five volumes are published yearly, ensuring that the authors' contributions are disseminated to the readership in a timely manner.

As always, the subjects covered are varied and exemplary of the myriad of subject matter dealt with by this long-running serial.


  • Includes numerous, timely, state-of-the-art reviews on the latest advancements in agronomy
  • Features distinguished, well recognized authors from around the world
  • Builds upon this venerable and iconic review series
  • Covers the extensive variety and breadth of subject matter in the crop and soil sciences
0065-2113
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 17,99 MB
978-0-12-805171-9 (9780128051719)
012805171x (012805171x)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One - Functional Relationships of Soil Acidification, Liming, and Greenhouse Gas Flux
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Soil acidification and liming
  • 2.1 Processes of Soil Acidification
  • 2.1.1 Natural Ecosystems
  • 2.1.2 Managed Ecosystems
  • 2.2 Effects of Soil Acidification
  • 2.2.1 Plant Nutrients
  • 2.2.2 Heavy Metals
  • 2.3 Amelioration of Soil Acidification
  • 3 Liming and greenhouse gas emission
  • 3.1 Carbon Dioxide
  • 3.1.1 Effect of Liming on Soil Organic Carbon
  • 3.1.2 Chemical Processes and CO2 Emission
  • 3.1.3 Biological Processes and CO2 Emission
  • 3.1.4 Lime-Induced Root Activity and Dissolved Organic Carbon
  • 3.2 Nitrous Oxide
  • 3.2.1 Processes Contributing to N2O Emission
  • 3.2.2 Molecular Microbial-Ecology of N2O Emission
  • 3.2.3 Soil pH and N2O and N2 Emissions
  • 3.3 Methane
  • 3.3.1 Soil pH and CH4 Oxidation
  • 4 Conclusions and future research needs
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter Two - Ideotype Root System Architecture for Maize to Achieve High Yield and Resource Use Efficiency in Intensive Cropping Systems
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Root system and root system architecture of maize
  • 3 Root system architecture for efficient N acquisition
  • 4 Root system architecture for efficient P acquisition
  • 5 Root system architecture for efficient water acquisition
  • 6 Root system architecture for high plant density and root-lodging resistance
  • 7 Root anatomical structure and the cost for root system establishment
  • 8 Models of the ideotype root system architecture for maize in the intensive cropping systems
  • 9 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter Three - Environmental Impact of Organic Agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Current State of Organic Agriculture
  • 3 Effects of Organic Agriculture on Soil Carbon Stocks
  • 3.1 Soil Inorganic Carbon Stock
  • 3.2 Soil Organic Carbon Stock
  • 3.2.1 Comparisons of Conventional and Organic Farming Systems
  • 3.2.1.1 Metaanalyses
  • 3.2.1.2 Soil Profile Studies
  • 3.2.1.3 Long-Term Experiments
  • 3.2.1.4 Organic Fertilizers
  • 3.2.1.5 Tropical Regions
  • 3.2.2 Comparisons of Organic Farming Systems
  • 3.2.2.1 Long-Term Experiments
  • 3.2.2.2 Livestock Husbandry and Animal Manure
  • 3.2.2.3 Soil Tillage and Green Manure
  • 3.2.2.4 Organic Fertilizers
  • 4 Soil-Derived Greenhouse Gas Fluxes Under Organic Agriculture
  • 4.1 Carbon Dioxide
  • 4.1.1 Comparisons of Conventional and Organic Farming Systems
  • 4.1.2 Comparisons of Organic Farming Systems
  • 4.2 Nitrous Oxide
  • 4.2.1 Comparisons of Conventional and Organic Farming Systems
  • 4.2.1.1 Metaanalyses
  • 4.2.1.2 Organic Fertilizers
  • 4.2.2 Comparisons of Organic Farming Systems
  • 4.2.2.1 Organic Fertilizers
  • 4.2.2.2 Catch Crops
  • 4.2.2.3 Tillage
  • 4.3 Methane
  • 4.3.1 Comparisons of Organic Farming Systems
  • 4.3.1.1 Organic Fertilizers
  • 4.3.1.2 Tillage
  • 5 Effects of Organic Agriculture on Yield
  • 5.1 Tropics and Subtropics
  • 5.2 Corn
  • 5.3 Rice
  • 5.4 Wheat
  • 6 Implications of Organic Agriculture for the Environment
  • 6.1 Soil Quality
  • 6.2 Air Quality
  • 6.3 Water Quality
  • 6.4 Biodiversity
  • 6.5 Energy Use
  • 6.6 Land Requirement
  • 7 Conclusions
  • 7.1 Pros
  • 7.2 Cons
  • References
  • Chapter Four - Monitoring and Modeling Soil Change: The Influence of Human Activity and Climatic Shifts on Aspects of Soil Spatiotemporally
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Soil Properties Most Susceptible to Anthropogenic Activity and Climate Change
  • 2.1 Anthropogenic Activity
  • 2.2 Climatic Shifts
  • 3 Methods of Measuring and Monitoring Soil Change
  • 3.1 Space-For-Time-Substitution/Chronosequences/Paired-Sites
  • 3.2 Long-Term Soil Experiments
  • 3.3 Soil Monitoring Networks
  • 3.3.1 Model-Based Sampling Strategies
  • 3.3.2 Design-Based Sampling Strategies
  • 3.3.3 Nonstatistical Monitoring Programs
  • 3.4 Legacy Data
  • 3.4.1 Utilizing Legacy Data Without Resampling
  • 3.4.2 Utilizing Legacy Data With Resampling
  • 3.4.2.1 New Site
  • 3.4.2.2 Same Site
  • 3.4.3 Utilizing Archived Soil Samples
  • 3.4.4 Laboratory Test Database
  • 3.5 Summary of Methods to Monitor/Measure Soil Change
  • 4 Challenges in Monitoring Soil Change
  • 4.1 Detecting a Change in Soil Properties
  • 4.1.1 Soil Spatial Variation
  • 4.1.2 Magnitude of Change
  • 4.1.3 Covariance Between Surveys and Returning to Sampling Sites
  • 4.2 Operational Issues and Sample Support
  • 4.3 Disentangling Effects of Climate and Land use
  • 5 Modeling Soil Change Into the Future
  • 6 Conclusions and Future Research Needs
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Five - Agronomic Effectiveness of Zinc Sources as Micronutrient Fertilizer
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Importance of Zn for Plants and Humans
  • 2.1 Zinc in Soils
  • 2.1.1 Soil Solution Zn
  • 2.1.2 Soil Solid Phase Zn and Reactions Controlling Zn Availability
  • 2.2 Zinc Deficiency in Soils and its Correction
  • 3 Sources of Zn for Fertilizer Production
  • 4 Types of Zn Fertilizers
  • 4.1 Zn Applied as a Single Nutrient
  • 4.1.1 Inorganic Compounds
  • 4.1.2 Synthetic Chelates
  • 4.1.3 Natural Organic Complexes
  • 4.1.4 Inorganic Complexes
  • 4.2 Zinc Applied as a Compound
  • 4.2.1 Zinc-N-P-K Fertilizer Technology
  • 4.2.2 Manures and Biosolids
  • 5 Chemical Reactions of Zn Fertilizers
  • 5.1 Chemical Reactions of Zn as Single Nutrient Fertilizer
  • 5.2 Chemical Reactions of Zn-Enriched Fertilizers
  • 5.2.1 Reactions of Zn With Macronutrient Compounds
  • 5.2.2 Chemical Reactions of Zn-Enriched Fertilizers Applied to the Soil
  • 6 Extraction Methods to Estimate Zn Fertilizer Effectiveness
  • 7 Agronomic Effectiveness of Zn Fertilizers
  • 7.1 Biofortification
  • 7.2 Fertilizer Zn Effectiveness in Soil
  • 7.2.1 Placement Effect
  • 7.2.2 Source Effect
  • 7.2.2.1 Physical Form
  • 7.2.2.2 Water Solubility
  • 7.2.2.3 Total Zn Content
  • 7.2.2.4 Granule Size
  • 7.2.3 Application Rate
  • 7.2.4 Residual Effectiveness
  • 7.3 Foliar Zn
  • 7.4 Seed Treatment
  • 8 New Technologies to Improve Zn Fertilizer Efficiency
  • 8.1 Nanotechnology in Zn Fertilizers
  • 8.2 Other Technologies
  • 9 Conclusions and Future Needs
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Index
  • Back cover

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