Practical Guide to Project Planning

A Step-by-step Approach
 
 
The Stationery Office Ltd (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 5. April 2016
  • |
  • 98 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-11-708286-1 (ISBN)
 
No matter which project management framework you are using, effective planning is crucial for success. This publication leads you through each stage of the planning process: defining, designing, developing and delivery, highlighting the practical steps for each. Role responsibilities, requirements and objectives are discussed in detail with case studies included to highlight the practical applications. This title has been written by authors who have been involved with numerous global consultations in project management. Using a step-by-step approach, the authors share the knowledge, experience and expertise for developing and delivering successful plans for project management.
  • Englisch
  • London
978-0-11-708286-1 (9780117082861)
0117082864 (0117082864)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • A Practical Guide to Project Planning - A Step-by-step Approach
  • Contents
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • About this guide
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Guiding principles of planning
  • 1.1.1 A consistent approach for all projects
  • 1.1.2 Transparency about obstacles
  • 1.1.3 Plans should be metrics-driven
  • 1.1.4 Involve stakeholders in the development
  • 1.1.5 Change must be controlled
  • 1.2 Project roles in planning
  • Table 1.1 Overview of roles and responsibilities in project planning
  • 1.3 Stages of planning
  • Figure 1.1 The four main stages of planning
  • 1.3.1 Defining the Plan
  • 1.3.2 Designing the Plan
  • 1.3.3 Developing the Plan
  • 1.3.4 Delivering the Plan
  • 1.4 Planning process overview
  • 2 Defining the Plan
  • Figure 2.1 Inputs, activities and outputs of Defining the Plan
  • 2.1 Establish objectives
  • 2.1.1 Technique
  • 2.1.2 Example
  • 2.2 Engage stakeholders
  • Table 2.1 Examples of objectives for the training course project
  • 2.2.1 Technique
  • Table 2.2 Communications stages
  • 2.2.2 Example
  • Table 2.3 Stakeholder support for the training course project's objectives
  • 2.3 Gather the business requirements
  • 2.3.1 Technique
  • 2.3.2 Example
  • Table 2.4 Requirements of the training course project
  • 2.4 Identify and analyse obstacles
  • 2.4.1 Technique
  • 2.4.2 Example
  • Table 2.5 Log of possible obstacles to the training course project
  • 2.5 Catalogue requirements
  • 2.5.1 Technique
  • 2.5.2 Example
  • Table 2.6 Requirements and categories for the training course project
  • Table 2.7 Example of requirements with multiple categories
  • 2.6 Establish priorities
  • 2.6.1 Technique
  • 2.6.2 Example
  • Table 2.8 Analysis of the requirements for the training course project
  • Table 2.9 Requirements and priorities for the training course project
  • 2.7 Role responsibilities for Defining the Plan
  • 3 Designing the Plan
  • 3.1 Map the journey
  • Figure 3.1 Inputs, activities and outputs of Designing the Plan
  • Table 3.1 Overview of the tools used in Designing the Plan
  • 3.1.1 Technique
  • 3.1.2 Example
  • Figure 3.2 Outcome model for training course project
  • 3.2 Identify outputs
  • Figure 3.3 Sequence model for the identification of products
  • 3.2.1 Technique
  • Figure 3.4 An example of a mind map for the training course project
  • 3.2.2 Example 1 - a product breakdown structure in mindmap format
  • 3.2.3 Example 2 - a product breakdown structure inhierarchical format
  • Figure 3.5 An example of the hierarchical format for the training course project
  • Table 3.2 Output 1 - Materials pack for the training course project
  • 3.3 Product sequencing
  • 3.3.1 Technique
  • 3.3.2 ExampleAgain using the training
  • Figure 3.6 A sequence of outputs produced by turning the hierarchical format on its side
  • 3.4 Develop specifications
  • 3.4.1 Technique
  • Table 3.3 The headings (or fields) to include in a product description
  • 3.4.2 Example
  • Table 3.4 A product description for the training course project
  • 3.5 Role responsibilities for Designing the Plan
  • 4 Developing the Plan
  • Figure 4.1 The project plan and its subsets
  • 4.1 Stage overview
  • Figure 4.2 Stage plans and associated plans
  • Figure 4.3 Inputs, activities and outputs of Developing the Plan
  • Table 4.1 Overview of the tools used in Developing the Plan
  • 4.2 Develop estimates
  • 4.2.1 Estimating techniques: basic
  • 4.2.2 Estimating techniques: advanced
  • 4.2.3 Simple example
  • Table 4.2 Three-point estimation example
  • 4.2.4 Advanced example
  • 4.3 Review risk
  • 4.3.1 Technique
  • 4.3.2 Example
  • Figure 4.4 Mapping risks against likelihood and impact
  • Table 4.3 Risk assessment for different scenarios
  • 4.4 Set tolerances
  • Figure 4.5 Major areas of control in a project
  • 4.4.1 Technique
  • 4.4.2 Example
  • Table 4.4 A simple contingency plan for setting up a helpline
  • 4.5 Define the stages
  • 4.5.1 Technique
  • 4.5.2 Example
  • Table 4.5 Lifecycle stages in setting up a helpline service
  • 4.6 Identify milestones
  • 4.6.1 Technique
  • 4.6.2 Example
  • Table 4.6 Examples of milestones for the helpline project
  • 4.7 Develop the schedule
  • 4.7.1 Technique: resource planning
  • Table 4.7 Tasks, activities and resources associated with a work package
  • 4.7.2 Example: resource planning
  • Table 4.8 Work package example for an office move
  • 4.7.3 Technique: critical path analysis
  • Figure 4.6 A product sequence diagram for the helpline example
  • 4.7.4 Example: critical path analysis
  • Table 4.9 Products required and interdependencies
  • Figure 4.7 Information to fill in for each task box in critical path analysis
  • Figure 4.8 Data mapped into the product sequence diagram and the resultant critical path
  • 4.7.5 Technique: Gantt chart
  • 4.7.6 Example: Gantt chart
  • 4.7.7 Finalizing the resource plan
  • Figure 4.9 Gantt chart example
  • 4.8 Design the controls
  • 4.8.1 Technique
  • 4.8.2 Example
  • 4.9 Role responsibilities for Developing the Plan
  • Table 4.10 Factors to consider in designing controls for risk management
  • Figure 4.10 Risk identification and analysis
  • 5 Delivering the Plan
  • Table 5.1 Overview of the tools used in Delivering the Plan
  • 5.1 Stage overview
  • Figure 5.1 Inputs, activities and outputs of Delivering the Plan
  • Figure 5.2 Cycle of activities for the final stages of a project
  • 5.2 Establish controls
  • 5.2.1 Technique
  • Table 5.2 Steps for change control
  • 5.2.2 Example
  • Table 5.3 Example of a change request
  • 5.3 Manage stakeholders
  • 5.3.1 Technique
  • 5.3.2 Example
  • Table 5.4 Stakeholder support mapped to project objectives (April)
  • Table 5.5 Stakeholder support mapped to project objectives (July)
  • Table 5.6 Change in stakeholder support from April to July
  • 5.4 Manage time
  • Figure 5.3 Graph of change in stakeholder support from April to July
  • 5.4.1 Technique
  • 5.4.2 Example
  • Table 5.7 Variation report for planned versus actual time
  • 5.5 Manage cost
  • 5.5.1 Technique
  • 5.5.2 Example
  • Table 5.8 Variation report for planned versus actual cost
  • 5.6 Manage quality
  • 5.6.1 Technique
  • Table 5.9 Review techniques for quality assurance
  • 5.6.2 Example
  • Table 5.10 Example of what to include in a quality report
  • 5.7 Capture lessons learned
  • 5.7.1 Technique
  • 5.7.2 Example
  • Table 5.11 An example of the key information for a lesson learned
  • 5.8 Role responsibilities for Delivering the Plan
  • Appendix 1 Summary of plans
  • Table A1.1 Summary of plans
  • Appendix 2 Project planning summary
  • A2.1 Introduction
  • A2.2 Overarching objective
  • A2.3 Plan definition (business requirements)
  • A2.3.1 Objectives
  • A2.3.2 Stakeholder analysis
  • A2.3.4 Categorized and prioritized business requirements
  • A2.3.5 Obstacles to be faced
  • A2.4 Plan design (outcome design)
  • A2.4.1 Outcome model
  • A2.4.2 Project output breakdown structure
  • A2.4.3 Product descriptions
  • A2.5 Plan development (product build)
  • A2.5.1 Schedule estimate and plan for contingency
  • A2.5.2 Stage plan
  • A2.5.3 Milestone plan
  • A2.5.4 Resource plan
  • A2.5.5 Project schedule
  • A2.5.6 Delivery controls
  • A2.5.7 Risk management
  • A2.6 Plan delivery
  • A2.6.1 Issue management and change control
  • A2.6.2 Stakeholder management
  • A2.6.3 Time management
  • A2.6.4 Cost management
  • A2.6.5 Quality management
  • A2.6.6 Capturing lessons learned
  • Index

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