Genetic and Genomic Resources for Grain Cereals Improvement

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 10. November 2015
  • |
  • 384 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802037-1 (ISBN)
 

Genetic and Genomic Resources For Cereals Improvement is the first book to bring together the latest available genetic resources and genomics to facilitate the identification of specific germplasm, trait mapping, and allele mining that are needed to more effectively develop biotic and abiotic-stress-resistant grains.

As grain cereals, including rice, wheat, maize, barley, sorghum, and millets constitute the bulk of global diets, both of vegetarian and non-vegetarian, there is a greater need for further genetic improvement, breeding, and plant genetic resources to secure the future food supply.

This book is an invaluable resource for researchers, crop biologists, and students working with crop development and the changes in environmental climate that have had significant impact on crop production. It includes the latest information on tactics that ensure that environmentally robust genes and crops resilient to climate change are identified and preserved.


  • Provides a single-volume resource on the global research work on grain cereals genetics and genomics
  • Presents information for effectively managing and utilizing the genetic resources of this core food supply source
  • Includes coverage of rice, wheat, maize, barley, sorghum, and pearl, finger and foxtail millets


Senior Scientist, Plant Breeding, Germplasm Evaluation Division, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Dehli, India
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 11,47 MB
978-0-12-802037-1 (9780128020371)
0128020377 (0128020377)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1 - Rice
  • 2 - Wheat
  • 3 - Barley
  • 4 - Oat
  • 5 - Sorghum
  • 6 - Pearl millet
  • 7 - Finger and foxtail millets
  • 8 - Proso, barnyard, little, and kodo millets
  • References
  • 1 - Rice
  • 1.1 - Introduction
  • 1.2 - Origin, distribution, and diversity
  • 1.3 - Germplasm exploration and collection
  • 1.3.1 - Germplasm introduction/acquisition
  • 1.3.2 - Collection of wild relatives
  • 1.3.3 - Wild species and its importance
  • 1.3.4 - Collection of trait-specific germplasm
  • 1.3.4.1 - Nerice rice
  • 1.3.4.2 - Medicinal (njavara) rice
  • 1.4 - Germplasm introduction
  • 1.5 - Germplasm conservation
  • 1.6 - Germplasm evaluation and utilization
  • 1.6.1 - Disease resistance
  • 1.6.2 - Insect resistance
  • 1.6.3 - Abiotic stress tolerance
  • 1.6.4 - Donors identified for different traits
  • 1.7 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 1.8 - Germplasm enhancement through wide crosses
  • 1.9 - Rejuvenation of cultivated germplasm
  • 1.10 - Sharing of germplasm
  • 1.11 - Registration of germplasm
  • 1.12 - Integration of genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement
  • 1.12.1 - Structural and functional genomic resources
  • 1.12.2 - Rice genome
  • 1.12.3 - Rice whole-genome sequencing
  • 1.12.3.1 - Cultivated rice
  • 1.12.3.2 - Wild rice
  • 1.12.4 - The Oryza map alignment project
  • 1.12.5 - Rice genome resequencing project (3000 accs.)
  • 1.12.6 - Plastome genome: plastid and mitochondrial genomes
  • 1.12.7 - Resequencing of rice genome
  • 1.12.8 - Structural genomics
  • 1.12.8.1 - Molecular marker
  • 1.12.8.2 - Gene identification and characterization
  • 1.12.8.2.1 - Conventional approaches: map-based cloning
  • 1.12.8.2.2 - Next-generational sequencing technology approach
  • 1.12.9 - Functional genomics
  • 1.12.10 - Mutant resources of rice
  • 1.12.10.1 - Mutants developed through physical and chemical mutagenesis
  • 1.12.10.2 - Mutants developed through insertional mutagenesis
  • 1.12.10.3 - T-DNA insertion mutagenesis
  • 1.12.10.4 - Transposon mutagenesis
  • 1.12.10.5 - Retrotransposon mutagenesis
  • 1.12.11 - Transcriptomic resources
  • 1.12.11.1 - Study of transcriptome composition
  • 1.12.11.1.1 - Sequencing of ESTs and FL-cDNA
  • 1.12.11.1.2 - Genomic tiling microarray analysis
  • 1.12.11.2 - Study of transcriptome dynamics
  • 1.12.11.2.1 - Microarray analysis
  • 1.12.11.2.2 - RNA-Seq analysis
  • 1.12.12 - Proteomic resources of rice
  • 1.12.13 - Rice systems biology
  • 1.13 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Further Readings
  • 2 - Wheat
  • 2.1 - Introduction
  • 2.2 - Evolution and origin of Triticum
  • 2.2.1 - Evolution
  • 2.2.2 - Origin and distribution of Triticum
  • 2.3 - Wheat genetic resources and gene pools
  • 2.4 - Genetic diversity and erosion from the traditional areas
  • 2.5 - Conservation of genetic resources
  • 2.5.1 - In situ conservation
  • 2.5.2 - Ex situ conservation
  • 2.6 - Processing to conservation
  • 2.6.1 - Characterization
  • 2.6.2 - Documentation
  • 2.6.3 - Multiplication and regeneration
  • 2.6.4 - Distribution
  • 2.7 - Role of genetic resources in wheat breeding
  • 2.7.1 - Increasing yield potential
  • 2.7.2 - Drought and heat tolerance
  • 2.7.3 - Resistance to diseases and insects
  • 2.7.4 - Resistance to salinity and micronutrients constraints
  • 2.7.5 - Improving grain quality
  • 2.8 - Strategies to enhance utilization of genetic resources
  • 2.8.1 - Focused identification of germplasm strategy
  • 2.9 - Utilization of gene introgression techniques
  • 2.9.1 - Hybridization and chromosome-mediated gene transfer
  • 2.9.2 - Use of 5B-deficient stocks
  • 2.9.3 - Use of appropriate genotypes of alien species
  • 2.9.4 - Direct gene transfer into wheat
  • 2.10 - Utilization of genomics
  • 2.11 - Future direction and prospects
  • References
  • 3 - Barley
  • 3.1 - Introduction
  • 3.2 - Origin
  • 3.3 - Domestication syndrome
  • 3.3.1 - Nonbrittle rachis
  • 3.3.2 - Six-rowed spike
  • 3.3.3 - Naked caryopsis
  • 3.3.4 - Reduced dormancy
  • 3.3.5 - Reduced vernalization
  • 3.3.6 - Photoperiod insensitivity
  • 3.4 - Distribution
  • 3.4.1 - Taxonomy
  • 3.4.2 - Gene pool
  • 3.4.2.1 - Primary gene pool
  • 3.4.2.2 - Secondary gene pool
  • 3.4.2.3 - Tertiary gene pool
  • 3.5 - Erosion of genetic diversity from the traditional areas
  • 3.6 - Germplasm evaluation and maintenance
  • 3.7 - Conservation of genetic resources
  • 3.7.1 - Ex situ conservation
  • 3.7.2 - In situ conservation
  • 3.7.3 - Utilization of wild relatives
  • 3.7.3.1 - H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum
  • 3.7.3.2 - Hordeum bulbosum
  • 3.8 - Limitation in germplasm use
  • 3.9 - Genomic resources
  • 3.9.1 - Genetic maps
  • 3.9.2 - QTL mapping
  • 3.9.2.1 - Mapping for yield and other related traits
  • 3.9.2.2 - Mapping for abiotic stress-tolerant genes
  • 3.9.2.3 - Mapping for biotic stress-tolerant genes
  • 3.9.3 - Association mapping
  • 3.9.4 - Comparative mapping and synteny
  • 3.9.5 - Marker-assisted selection
  • 3.9.6 - Genome sequencing
  • 3.10 - Future perspectives
  • References
  • 4 - Oat
  • 4.1 - Introduction
  • 4.2 - Origin, distribution, and diversity
  • 4.2.1 - Taxonomy
  • 4.2.2 - Diversity
  • 4.2.3 - Origin and distribution
  • 4.3 - Erosion of genetic diversity from the traditional areas
  • 4.4 - Status of germplasm resources conservation
  • 4.4.1 - Conservation of cultivated gene pool
  • 4.4.2 - Conservation of wild gene pool
  • 4.4.3 - In situ conservation
  • 4.4.4 - On-farm conservation
  • 4.4.5 - Access to genetic resources
  • 4.5 - Germplasm evaluation and maintenance
  • 4.6 - Use of germplasm in crop improvement
  • 4.6.1 - Yield
  • 4.6.2 - Lodging
  • 4.6.3 - Disease resistance
  • 4.6.4 - Pest resistance
  • 4.6.5 - Abiotic stress resistance
  • 4.6.6 - Grain quality
  • 4.6.6.1 - Protein
  • 4.6.6.2 - Lipids
  • 4.6.6.3 - Nonstructural carbohydrates
  • 4.6.6.4 - Fiber
  • 4.7 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 4.8 - Germplasm enhancement through wide crosses
  • 4.8.1 - Germplasm for target traits
  • 4.8.2 - Breaking the interspecific isolation barriers
  • 4.8.3 - Further improvement of oat interspecific derivatives
  • 4.9 - Integration of genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement
  • 4.9.1 - Wild species diversity
  • 4.9.2 - Cultivated species diversity
  • 4.9.3 - Genetic linkage mapping
  • 4.9.4 - Molecular breeding
  • 4.10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 5 - Sorghum
  • 5.1 - Introduction
  • 5.2 - Origin, distribution, and diversity
  • 5.3 - Erosion of genetic diversity from the traditional areas
  • 5.4 - Status of germplasm resource conservation
  • 5.5 - Germplasm evaluation and maintenance
  • 5.6 - Use of germplasm in crop improvement
  • 5.7 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 5.8 - Germplasm enhancement through wide crosses
  • 5.9 - Integration of genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement
  • 5.9.1 - Molecular markers and genotyping, genetic maps and trait mapping, molecular breeding
  • 5.9.2 - Association mapping
  • 5.10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 6 - Pearl millet
  • 6.1 - Introduction
  • 6.2 - Origin, distribution, and diversity
  • 6.2.1 - Taxonomy and diversity
  • 6.2.1.1 - Sections
  • 6.2.1.2 - Genepool
  • 6.2.1.3 - Races
  • 6.2.1.4 - Genomic relationships
  • 6.3 - Erosion of genetic diversity and gene flow
  • 6.4 - Germplasm resources conservation
  • 6.5 - Germplasm characterization and evaluation
  • 6.5.1 - Agronomic traits
  • 6.5.2 - Abiotic stress tolerance
  • 6.5.3 - Biotic stress tolerance
  • 6.5.4 - Seed nutritional quality
  • 6.5.5 - Source of male sterility
  • 6.6 - Germplasm regeneration and documentation
  • 6.6.1 - Intercrossing
  • 6.6.2 - Cluster bagging
  • 6.6.3 - Selfing
  • 6.6.4 - Genepools
  • 6.7 - Gap analyses of germplasm
  • 6.8 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 6.9 - Germplasm uses in pearl millet improvement
  • 6.9.1 - Cultivated germplasm
  • 6.9.2 - Wild relatives
  • 6.9.3 - Chromosome segment substitution lines
  • 6.10 - Genomic resources in management and utilization of germplasm
  • 6.11 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 7 - Finger and foxtail millets
  • 7.1 - Introduction
  • 7.2 - Origin, distribution, diversity, and taxonomy
  • 7.2.1 - Finger millet
  • 7.2.2 - Foxtail millet
  • 7.3 - Erosion of genetic diversity from the traditional areas
  • 7.4 - Status of germplasm resource conservation
  • 7.5 - Germplasm evaluation and maintenance
  • 7.5.1 - Agronomic traits
  • 7.5.2 - Grain nutrients
  • 7.5.3 - Biotic stress
  • 7.5.4 - Abiotic stress
  • 7.5.4.1 - Drought
  • 7.5.4.2 - Heat stress
  • 7.5.4.3 - Salinity
  • 7.5.4.4 - Lodging
  • 7.5.4.5 - Waterlogging
  • 7.6 - Use of germplasm in crop improvement
  • 7.7 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 7.8 - Germplasm enhancement through wide crosses
  • 7.9 - Integration of genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement
  • 7.9.1 - Molecular markers and genome sequence
  • 7.9.2 - Genetic maps
  • 7.10 - Utilization of genetic and genomic resources
  • 7.11 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 8 - Proso, barnyard, little, and kodo millets
  • 8.1 - Introduction
  • 8.2 - Origin, distribution, taxonomy, and diversity
  • 8.3 - Erosion of genetic diversity from the traditional areas
  • 8.4 - Status of germplasm resource conservation
  • 8.5 - Germplasm evaluation and maintenance
  • 8.5.1 - Germplasm evaluation
  • 8.5.1.1 - Agronomic traits
  • 8.5.1.2 - Nutritional traits
  • 8.5.1.3 - Biotic stress
  • 8.5.1.4 - Abiotic stress
  • 8.6 - Use of germplasm in crop improvement
  • 8.6.1 - Development of core collection
  • 8.7 - Limitations in germplasm use
  • 8.8 - Germplasm enhancement through wide crosses
  • 8.9 - Integration of genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement
  • 8.10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Subject Index
  • Back Cover

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