Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology

 
 
Academic Press
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 19. Januar 2016
  • |
  • 752 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-800576-7 (ISBN)
 

Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology, Second Edition, presents the latest knowledge on potato chemistry, including the identification, analysis, and uses of chemical components in potatoes. Beginning with a brief description of potato components, the book then delves into their role during processing, then presenting information on strategies for quality optimization that provides students, researchers, and technologists working in the area of food science with recent information and updates on state-of-the-art technologies.

The updated edition includes the latest information related to the identification, analysis, and use of chemical components of potatoes, carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate composition, cell wall chemistry, an analysis of glycoalkaloids, phenolics and anthocyanins, thermal processing, and quality optimization.

In addition, new and sophisticated methods of quality determination of potatoes and their products, innovative and healthy potato-based foods, the future of genetically modified potatoes, and the non-food use of potatoes and their products is discussed.


  • Includes both the emerging non-food uses of potato and potato-by-products as well as the expanding knowledge on the food-focused use of potatoes
  • Presents case studies on the problems, factors, proposed solutions, and pros and cons of each, allowing readers facing similar concerns and issues to effectively and efficiently identify an appropriate solution
  • Written by a global collection of experts in both food and non-food potato science
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 14,22 MB
978-0-12-800576-7 (9780128005767)
0128005769 (0128005769)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Advances in Potato Chemistry & Technology, Second Edition
  • Chemistry, Processing, and Nutritional Attributes of Potatoes-An Introduction
  • References
  • 1 - Potato Origin and Production
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Origin, Domestication, and Diversity
  • 2.1 Biosystematics and Evolution
  • 2.2 Wild Relatives
  • 2.3 Landraces
  • 3. Production in the Center of Origin
  • 4. Spread and Global Production Trends Outside the Center of Origin
  • 4.1 Spread of a New World Crop
  • 4.2 Production Trends
  • 5. Conservation in the Center of Origin
  • 5.1 Ex Situ Conservation
  • 5.2 On-Farm Conservation
  • 5.3 Ongoing Evolution
  • 6. Uses of Potato in the Center of Origin
  • 6.1 Traditional Uses
  • 6.2 Modern Uses
  • 7. Trend for Sustainable Conservation and Use
  • References
  • 2 - Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Potato
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Isolation of Potato Cell Walls
  • 3. Cell Wall Polysaccharides
  • 3.1 Cellulose
  • 3.2 Hemicelluloses
  • 3.2.1 Galactoglucomannan
  • 3.2.2 Glucuronoarabinoxylan
  • 3.2.3 Xyloglucan
  • 3.3 Pectin
  • 3.4 Potato Pectin Extraction and Structural Specificities
  • 3.5 Specific Recovery and Analysis of Potato RGI Pectic Domain
  • 4. Effects of Heating on Potato Cell Wall Polysaccharides
  • 5. Distribution of Pectin in Potato Tuber and Function in Cell Walls
  • 5.1 Tuber Formation and Histology
  • 5.2 Distribution of Pectin in Developing and Mature Potato Tuber
  • 5.3 Pectin Functions in the Wall
  • References
  • 3 - Structure of Potato Starch
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Polysaccharide Components of Potato Starch
  • 3. Starch Granules in Potato
  • 4. Phosphorylated Potato Starch
  • 5. Potato Starch Synthesis
  • 5.1 Sugar Activation and Regulation of Synthesis
  • 5.2 Chain Elongation
  • 5.3 Branching and Maturation Debranching
  • 5.4 Starch Phosphorylation
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References
  • 4 - Potato Proteins: Functional Food Ingredients
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Potato Proteins
  • 2.1 Chemical and Structural Properties
  • 2.1.1 Patatin
  • 2.1.2 Protease Inhibitors
  • 2.1.3 Others
  • 2.2 Nutritional and Health-Promoting Properties
  • 2.3 Functional Properties
  • 2.3.1 Solubility
  • 2.3.2 Emulsifying Properties
  • 2.3.3 Foaming Properties
  • 2.4 Potato Byproduct as a Source of Potato Proteins
  • 2.5 Extraction Methods of Proteins
  • 2.5.1 Combination: Thermal and Acidic Precipitation
  • 2.5.2 Precipitation Methods
  • 2.5.2.1 Salt Precipitation
  • 2.5.2.2 Ethanol Precipitation
  • 2.5.2.3 Ammonium Sulfate Precipitation
  • 2.5.2.4 Carboxymethyl Cellulose Complexation
  • 2.5.3 Ion Exchange
  • 2.6 Separation of Bioactive Proteins and Peptides
  • 2.7 Potential Application of Potato Proteins
  • 2.7.1 Biogeneration of Peptides through Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Potato Proteins
  • 3. Conclusion
  • References
  • 5 - Potato Lipids
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Chemical Composition of Potato Tuber
  • 2. Lipids of Potato
  • 2.1 Effect of Processing on Potato Lipids
  • 3. Lipids of Transgenic Potato Cultivars
  • 3.1 Total Lipids and Lipid Classes
  • 3.2 Fatty Acid Composition
  • 3.3 Sterol Composition
  • 3.4 Tocopherol Composition
  • References
  • 6 - Vitamins, Phytonutrients, and Minerals in Potato
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Potatoes, Nutrition, and the Food Debates
  • 3. Basic Potato Nutritional Content
  • 3.1 A Nutrient-Dense Food
  • 4. A Survey of Vitamins in Potatoes
  • 4.1 Vitamin C
  • 4.2 The Vitamin B Family: Biochemical Function and Content in Potato
  • 4.2.1 B1-Thiamin
  • 4.2.2 B3-Niacin
  • 4.2.3 B5-Pantothenic Acid
  • 4.2.4 B6-Pyridoxine
  • 4.2.5 B9-Folic Acid
  • 5. Glycoalkaloids
  • 5.1 GAs: Friends or Foes?
  • 5.2 GA Biosynthesis
  • 5.3 Factors That Increase GAs
  • 5.4 Types of Potato GAs
  • 5.5 Toxic Effects of GAs
  • 5.6 Health-Promoting Effects of GAs
  • 5.7 Future Needs in GA Research
  • 6. Potato Minerals
  • 6.1 Potassium
  • 6.2 Phosphorus
  • 6.3 Calcium
  • 6.4 Magnesium and Manganese
  • 6.5 Iron
  • 6.6 Zinc and Copper
  • 7. Potato Phenylpropanoids
  • 7.1 Chlorogenic Acid
  • 7.2 Flavonols, Anthocyanins, and Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides
  • 7.3 Browning
  • 8. Effect of Development on Tuber Phytonutrients
  • 9. Carotenoids
  • 10. Effect of Cooking on Phytonutrient Content
  • 11. The Role of Potatoes in Global Food Security
  • 12. Conclusion
  • References
  • 7 - Glycoalkaloids and Calystegine Alkaloids in Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Glycoalkaloids
  • 2.1 Abundance in the Tuber
  • 2.1.1 Agronomy
  • 2.1.2 Storage
  • 2.1.3 Processing
  • 2.1.4 Distribution
  • 2.1.5 Ratio of a-Chaconine to a-Solanine
  • 2.2 Toxicity
  • 2.3 Healthful Benefits
  • 2.4 Analysis
  • 2.4.1 Total Glycoalkaloid Analysis
  • 2.4.1.1 Gravimetric Analysis
  • 2.4.1.2 Colorimetry
  • 2.4.1.3 Immunoassay
  • 2.4.1.4 Biosensors
  • 2.4.1.5 Cell Assay
  • 2.4.2 Analysis of Individual Glycoalkaloids
  • 2.4.2.1 Thin-Layer Chromatography
  • 2.4.2.2 High-Performance Liquid Chromatography
  • 2.4.2.3 Mass Spectrometry
  • 3. Calystegine Alkaloids
  • 3.1 Abundance in the Tuber
  • 3.2 Toxicity
  • 3.3 Healthful Benefits
  • 3.4 Analysis
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 8 - Potato Starch and Its Modification
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Potato Starch versus Cereal Starches
  • 2.1 Morphology
  • 2.2 Composition
  • 2.3 Swelling Power and Solubility
  • 2.4 Pasting/Rheological Properties
  • 2.5 Gelatinization and Retrogradation: Thermal Properties
  • 3. Potato Starch Modification
  • 3.1 Physical Modification
  • 3.1.1 Heat/Moisture/Pressure/Sonication Treatments
  • 3.1.2 Pregelatinization
  • 3.2 Conversion
  • 3.2.1 Acid/Enzymatic Hydrolysis
  • 3.2.2 Oxidation/Bleaching
  • 3.3 Derivatization
  • 3.3.1 Common Types of Derivatization
  • 3.3.2 Extent of Derivatization
  • 3.3.3 Morphological Properties of Derivatized Potato Starch
  • 3.3.4 Physicochemical Properties of Derivatized Potato Starch
  • 3.3.5 Pasting/Rheological Properties of Derivatized Potato Starch
  • 3.3.6 Gelatinization and Retrogradation (Thermal Properties) of Derivatized Potato Starch
  • 4. Nutritional and Toxicological Aspects
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References
  • 9 - Colored Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Potatoes with Red and Purple Flesh
  • 3. Potato Antioxidants
  • 3.1 Polyphenols
  • 3.2 Anthocyanin Colorants
  • 3.3 Carotenoids
  • 3.4 Other Potato Antioxidants
  • 4. Colored Potato AOA
  • 5. Factors Influencing Levels of Beneficial Phytochemicals, AOA, and Antinutrients in Colored Potatoes
  • 5.1 Effect of Potato Varieties and Cultivars
  • 5.2 Effects of Growing Location, Climatic Conditions, and Cultivation Practice on Major Potato Antioxidants and AOA
  • 5.3 Effects of Peeling and Cooking Methods on the Bioactive Compounds of Colored Potatoes
  • 6. Health Benefits, Nutritional Aspects, and Use of Colored Potatoes
  • 7. Conclusions and Future Trends
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 10 - Postharvest Storage of Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Maturity of Tubers
  • 3. Growing Conditions Affecting Postharvest Storage
  • 3.1 Abiotic Factors
  • 3.1.1 Moisture
  • 3.1.2 Nutrient Status
  • 4. Harvesting and Handling Factors Affecting Postharvest Storage
  • 5. Pests and Diseases
  • 6. Biochemical Changes of Tubers During Storage
  • 6.1 Respiration
  • 6.2 Water Loss
  • 6.3 Sprouting
  • 6.4 Pests and Diseases
  • 6.5 Temperature
  • 6.6 Low-Temperature Sweetening (LTS)
  • 7. Storage Preparations and Conditions
  • 7.1 Storage Methods
  • 8. Storage Process
  • 8.1 Preharvest Storage Preparations
  • 8.2 Filling the Storage
  • 8.3 Equalization and Drying Phase
  • 8.4 Wound Healing/Curing
  • 8.5 Preconditioning Phase
  • 8.6 Cooling Period
  • 8.7 Holding Period
  • 8.8 Conditioning
  • 9. Management of Storage Environment
  • 10. Effect of Postharvest Storage on Processing and Nutritional Quality of Potatoes
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 11 - Organic Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Macroelements (N, P, K, Ca, Mg , S)
  • 2.1 Nitrogen
  • 2.2 Phosphorus
  • 2.3 Potassium
  • 2.4 Magnesium
  • 2.5 Sulfur
  • 2.6 Calcium
  • 3. Phenolic Compounds
  • 4. Carotenoids
  • 5. Glycoalkaloids
  • 6. Ascorbic Acid
  • 7. Conclusions
  • References
  • 12 - Potato Flavor
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Aroma and Flavor
  • 2.1 Raw Potatoes
  • 2.2 Effects of Cooking
  • 2.3 Boiled Potatoes
  • 2.4 Baked Potatoes
  • 2.5 Microwave-Baked Potatoes
  • 2.6 French Fries
  • 3. Identifying Flavor Compounds
  • 4. Taste
  • 4.1 Bitterness
  • 4.2 Sourness
  • 4.3 Sweetness
  • 4.4 Umami
  • 5. Texture
  • 6. Influence of Growth and Storage Environment on Flavor
  • 7. Combining Sensory Panels with Molecular and Metabolomics Approaches
  • 8. Summary
  • References
  • 13 - Microstructure, Starch Digestion, and Glycemic Index of Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Starch Digestion and GI of Potatoes
  • 3. Potato Microstructure and Starch Digestion
  • 3.1 Microstructural Characteristics of Potato and Starch Digestion
  • 3.1.1 Microstructural Characteristics of Potato
  • 3.1.2 Starch Digestion In Vitro and Microstructure of Digesta
  • 4. Rheology of Food Matrix and Starch Digestion
  • 4.1 Rheology (Flow Behavior) of Potato Digesta
  • 5. Formulated Foods and Starch Digestion
  • 5.1 Influence of Food Matrix Composition on Starch Digestion
  • 5.2 Influence of Food Processing on Starch Digestion
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 14 - Thermal Processing of Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Product versus Quality
  • 2.1 Composition
  • 2.2 Varietal Suitability for Processing
  • 2.3 Agrotechnical Practices and Conditions
  • 2.4 Technological Factors
  • 2.5 Quality Assessments of Raw and Processed Potatoes
  • 3. Processing versus Quality
  • 3.1 Main Preparatory Procedures
  • 3.1.1 Washing and Peeling
  • 3.1.2 Cutting
  • 3.2 Thermal Treatments Effects
  • 3.2.1 Blanching and/or Drying Methods
  • 3.2.2 Stepwise Blanching and PME Activity
  • 3.2.3 Freezing, Freezing-Thawing Cycles, and Thawing-Cooking
  • 3.2.4 Storage and Temperature Oscillation
  • 4. Softening Kinetics
  • 5. Quality Optimization
  • 5.1 Frozen Potatoes
  • 5.2 Frozen Mashed Potatoes
  • 5.3 Other Heat-Treated Potatoes
  • 6. Novel or Emerging Methods and Outlook for the Future
  • References
  • 15 - Fried and Dehydrated Potato Products
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Importance of Chemical Composition in Potato Processing
  • 3. Importance of Microstructure in Potato Processing
  • 4. Potato Processing: Important Derived Products
  • 4.1 Blanched Potatoes
  • 4.2 Cooked Potatoes
  • 4.3 Fried Potatoes
  • 4.4 Dehydrated Potatoes
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 16 - Textural Characteristics of Raw and Cooked Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cooking and Sensory Characteristics
  • 3. Textural Characteristics
  • 3.1 Texture Profile Analysis
  • 3.2 Stress Relaxation Model
  • 4. Rheological and Thermal Characteristics
  • 4.1 Rheology of Potatoes
  • 4.2 Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Potatoes
  • 4.3 Kinetics of Firmness Changes in Potato
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References
  • 17 - Mechanisms of Oil Uptake in French Fries
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physics of Cooling and Oil Uptake During Cooling
  • 2.1 Oil Uptake is a Problem of Pressure
  • 2.1.1 A First Description of Drying at a Product Scale
  • 2.1.2 Oil Capillary Pressure
  • 2.2 Variations in Total Pressure During Frying and Postfrying Cooling
  • 2.2.1 Pressure Gauge during Frying and Cooling
  • 2.2.2 Positive Pressure Gauge Prevents Oil from Entering the Product during Immersion Frying
  • 2.3 Oil Transport Resulting from Pressure Gradient
  • 2.3.1 Continuous Medium Approximations of Oil Transport: Considering Oil and Gas as Miscible Phases
  • 2.3.2 Oil and Gas as Immiscible Phases
  • 2.3.3 Variation of the Pressure Inside One Single Potato Cell: Effect of an Incondensable Phase (e.g., air)
  • 3. Typology of Defects Provoking Oil Uptake
  • 3.1 Natural Defects in Cellular Tissues
  • 3.2 Distribution of Cell Defects' Radii and Typical Oil Impregnation Profiles
  • 3.3 Summary of Defects Creating Pathways to Oil Percolation
  • 4. Multiscale Modeling of Oil Uptake
  • 4.1 Air Transport Mechanisms on the Cellular Scale
  • 4.2 Experimental Penetration Kinetics
  • 4.3 Extensions of the Proposed KMC Approach
  • 5. Deviations to Generally Accepted Oil Uptake Mechanisms
  • 5.1 Experimental Setup
  • 5.2 Typical Results with t0=0and t1=1min
  • 5.3 Generalization for t0>0 and t1=1min
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 18 - Acrylamide in Potato Products
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Pathways for Acrylamide Formation
  • 1.2 Occurrence of Acrylamide in Foods and Dietary Exposure Assessment
  • 1.3 Health Risks and Risk Assessment
  • 2. Aspects Affecting Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Products and Possible Mitigation Strategies
  • 2.1 Potato Cultivar
  • 2.2 Soil Properties and Fertilization
  • 2.3 Climatological Conditions and Maturity of the Tuber
  • 2.4 Potato Storage
  • 2.5 Quality Control of Incoming Potatoes
  • 2.6 Cutting
  • 2.7 Blanching Process
  • 2.8 Use of Additives or Processing Aids
  • 2.9 Drying
  • 2.10 Frying
  • 3. Additives or Processing Aids-from Lab Tests to Industrial Scale
  • 4. Evolution of Risk Management
  • 5. Future Outlook
  • References
  • 19 - Advanced Analytical Techniques for Quality Evaluation of Potato and Its Products
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Analytical Techniques
  • 2.1 Dry Matter and Specific Gravity
  • 2.2 Starch
  • 2.3 Protein
  • 2.4 Sugars
  • 2.5 Acrylamide
  • 2.6 Phenolic Compounds and Carotenoids
  • 3. Quality Evaluation
  • 3.1 Texture
  • 3.2 Sensory
  • 3.3 Color
  • 3.4 Glycemic Index
  • 3.5 Damage
  • 4. Advanced Techniques
  • 4.1 Microscopy
  • 4.2 X-Ray Analysis and DSC
  • 4.3 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)
  • 4.4 Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS)
  • 4.5 Microwave Heating
  • 4.6 Imaging Systems
  • 5. Final Remarks
  • References
  • 20 - The Role of Potatoes in Biomedical/Pharmaceutical and Fermentation Applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Biomedical Applications
  • 3. Pharmaceutical Applications
  • 4. Fermentation Applications
  • 5. Other Applications
  • 5.1 Animal Feed
  • 5.2 Technical Applications
  • 5.3 Functional Food
  • References
  • 21 - Novel Applications of Potatoes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Biodegradable Packaging
  • 3. Fiber-Reinforced Biodegradable Composites for Constructive Parts in Aerospace, Automotive, and Other Areas
  • 4. Edible Films
  • 5. Textiles and Paper
  • 6. Starch Spherulites and Nanocrystals
  • 7. Potato Waste Utilization and Other Miscellaneous Uses
  • References
  • 22 - Potato Proteomics: A New Approach for the Potato Processing Industry
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Proteomics Techniques-An Overview
  • 3. Proteomics in Food Nutrition and Processing
  • 4. Potato Proteomics and Quality Improvement
  • 4.1 Transgenic Potatoes-Meeting Specific Demands
  • 4.2 Potato Pathogens and Tuber Quality
  • 4.3 Proteomics and Stress Adaptation in Potatoes
  • 4.4 Postharvest Proteomics
  • 4.5 Proteomics of Potato Subcellular Compartments
  • 4.5.1 Biomass and Vitamin Production
  • 4.5.2 Starch
  • 4.5.3 Protein Content
  • 5. Getting the Best of Potato-Perspectives of Proteomics Applied to Product Quality
  • 5.1 Crop and Genotype-Specific Adaptation
  • 5.2 Protein Synthesis and Transport
  • 5.3 Peroxisomes-A Site of Hormone and Biotin Biosynthesis
  • 5.4 How Are Tubers Made?
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 23 - Potatoes and Human Health
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nutrient Contributions
  • 3. Dietary Guidance
  • 4. Obesity
  • 5. Diabetes
  • 6. Immune Function and Inflammation
  • 7. Cardiovascular Disease
  • 8. Cancer
  • 9. Gastrointestinal Health
  • 10. Chronic Kidney Disease
  • 11. Consumer Benefits
  • 12. Conclusions
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

145,12 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok