Marking Thought and Talk in New Testament Greek

New Light from Linguistics on the Particles 'hina' and 'hoti'
 
 
James Clarke & Co Ltd (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 28. Mai 2015
  • |
  • 242 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-227-90328-5 (ISBN)
 
This book uses insights from a modern theory of communication, Relevance Theory, to examine the function of the particle i(/na [SET IN SpIonic] in New Testament Greek. It claims that the particle does not have a lexical meaning of "in order that," contrary to accepted wisdom, but that it alerts the reader to expect an interpretation of the thought or attitude of the implied speaker or author. Evidence is adduced from pagan Greek and in particular the writings of Polybius, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, and Epictetus, as well as the New Testament. The implications of this claim give an opportunity for a fresh interpretation of many problematic texts.
  • Englisch
  • Cambridge
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • 2,30 MB
978-0-227-90328-5 (9780227903285)
0227903285 (0227903285)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Margaret G. Sim is an International Translation Consultant with SIL and has been lecturing in New Testament at Africa International University since 1992.
  • Front Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Information
  • Contents
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgements
  • Abbreviations
  • CHAPTER 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Background to Study
  • 1.2 Problem to be Addressed
  • 1.3 Review of Scholarly Opinion
  • 1.3.1 Classical Greek - Grammars
  • 1.3.2 Koine Greek
  • 1.3.2.1 TRADITIONAL GRAMMARS
  • 1.3.2.2 PARTICULAR PROPOSALS FOR THE USE OF hina
  • 1.3.2.3 ANALYSIS PRESENTED BY GREEK GRAMMARIANS
  • 1.4 Corpus
  • 1.5 Theoretical Basis for Book
  • 1.6 Arrangement of Chapters
  • 1.7 Summary
  • CHAPTER 2. Theoretical Basis for Study
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Relevance Theory
  • 2.2.1 General Background
  • 2.2.2 Delineation of Theory
  • 2.2.2.1 INFERENCES
  • 2.2.2.2 HOW INFERENCES ARE SAID TO BE DRAWN
  • 2.2.2.3 CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATION
  • 2.2.2.4 UNDERDETERMINACY
  • 2.2.2.4.1 SHARED CONTEXTUAL ASSUMPTIONS
  • 2.2.2.4.2 UNDERDETERMINACY IN PARTICIPLES
  • 2.2.2.4.3 UNDERDETERMINACY IN PARTICLES
  • 2.2.2.5 METAREPRESENTATION
  • 2.2.2.6 PROCEDURAL MARKERS
  • 2.2.2.7 OSTENSIVE BEHAVIOUR
  • 2.3 Purpose or Intention in Koine
  • 2.4 Summary
  • CHAPTER 3. Independent Clauses Introduced by hina
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Use of hina to Give an Answer to a Question
  • 3.3 Question and Answer by the Same Speaker
  • 3.3.1 Examples from Polybius and Epictetus
  • 3.3.2 New Testament Examples
  • 3.4 Expressing Desire and Intention
  • 3.4.1 Johannine Examples
  • 3.4.2 Examples from Orators and Rhetoricians
  • 3.4.2.1 DEMOSTHENES
  • 3.4.2.2 DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS
  • 3.4.3 Examples from Septuagint and Non-Literary Papyri
  • 3.4.3.1 SEPTUAGINT
  • 3.4.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE PAPYRI
  • 3.4.4 Examples from the Epistles
  • 3.5 Introducing a Quotation from the Old Testament
  • 3.6 Indicating Speaker's Interpretation
  • 3.7 Reporting the Thoughts or Speech of Others
  • 3.8 Summary
  • CHAPTER 4. Requests, Commands, Prayers Introduced by hina
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Authorial Choice
  • Table 1
  • 4.3. Synoptic Examples in Indirect Command
  • 4.3.1 Healing of Jairus' Daughter
  • Matthew 9:18
  • Mark 5:23
  • Luke 8:41, 42
  • 4.3.1.1 MATTHEW 9:18
  • 4.3.1.2 MARK 5:23
  • 4.3.1.3 LUKE 8:41, 42
  • 4.3.1.4 CONCLUSION
  • 4.3.2 The Healing of a Boy with a Demon: Matthew 17:15, 16
  • Mark 9:17, 18
  • Luke 9:38, 40
  • 4.3.2.1 MATTHEW 17:15, 16
  • 4.3.2.2 MARK 9:17, 18.
  • 4.3.2.3 LUKE 9:38, 40
  • 4.3.2.4 CONCLUSION
  • 4.3.3 The Healing of the Demon Possessed Man: Matthew 8:34
  • Mark 5:17
  • Luke 8:37
  • 4.3.3.1 MATTHEW 8:34
  • 4.3.3.2 MARK 5:17
  • 4.3.3.3 LUKE 8:37
  • 4.3.3.4 CONCLUSION
  • 4.3.4 Authorial Choice in Same Context
  • 4.4 Examples from Literary Koine
  • 4.4.1 Examples from Dionysius of Halicarnassus
  • 4.4.2 Examples from Polybius
  • 4.4.3 Examples from Epictetus
  • 4.5 Summary
  • CHAPTER 5. Noun Clauses Introduced by hina
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Review of Metarepresentation
  • 5.3 Explication of a Noun, Adjective or Demonstrative
  • 5.3.1 Adjectives in Stative Clauses
  • 5.3.1.1 NEW TESTAMENT EXAMPLES
  • 5.3.1.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE DISCOURSES OF EPICTETUS
  • 5.3.2 Nouns and Demonstratives in Stative Clauses
  • 5.3.3 Nouns in Non-Stative Clauses Complemented by hina Clauses
  • 5.3.3.1 NEW TESTAMENT EXAMPLES
  • 5.3.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS
  • 5.4 Noun Clauses with Impersonal Verbs
  • 5.5 Noun Clauses which Function as Object of Main Verb
  • 5.5.1 Examples from the New Testament
  • 5.5.2 Examples from Epictetus
  • 5.6 Prophetic Utterance Introduced by hina
  • 5.7 Summary
  • CHAPTER 6. Purpose Clauses Introduced by hina
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Purpose as Indicating Intention, and Beyond
  • 6.2.1 The Role of Context in Interpreting hina
  • 6.2.2 Purpose Attributed
  • 6.2.2.1 AUTHOR'S ACKNOWLEDGED ATTRIBUTION OF INTENT
  • 6.2.2.2 REPRESENTATION OF INTENTION OF SUBJECT
  • 6.2.2.3 PURPOSE FROM OBSERVABLE BEHAVIOUR
  • 6.2.2.4 INTERPRETATION OF BEHAVIOUR PATTERNS
  • 6.2.2.5 ATTRIBUTION OF INTENTION WITHOUT EVIDENCE
  • 6.3 Other Ways of Expressing Purpose
  • 6.4 Disputed Purpose Clauses
  • 6.5 Summary
  • CHAPTER 7. Investigating hoti
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Classical Greek
  • 7.2.1 Direct Speech
  • 7.2.2 Indirect Speech
  • 7.2.3 Causal Clauses
  • 7.3 Koine Greek
  • 7.3.1 Direct Speech
  • 7.3.2 Indirect Speech
  • 7.3.2.1 EXAMPLES FROM PAGAN WRITERS: EPICTETUS AND POLYBIUS
  • 7.3.2.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT
  • 7.3.3 Causal Clauses
  • 7.3.3.1 EXAMPLES FROM EPICTETUS AND POLYBIUS
  • 7.3.3.2 EXAMPLES FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT
  • 7.4 Summary
  • CHAPTER 8. Diachronic use of hina
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Classical Greek 500-300 BCE
  • Table 2
  • 8.3 Hellenistic Greek 300-150 BCE
  • 8.4 Graeco-Roman (150 BCE to 300 CE)
  • 8.4.1 Separation of Registers
  • 8.4.1.1 HIGH LEVEL OF LANGUAGE: DIONYSIUS AND LUKE-ACTS
  • 8.4.1.2 MORE COLLOQUIAL: EPICTETUS AND PAUL
  • 8.4.2 Trends in Hellenistic Becoming More Marked
  • 8.4.3 General Linguistic Changes
  • 8.4.3.1 PHONETIC CHANGES
  • 8.4.3.2 SYNTACTIC CHANGES
  • 8.4.4 Language of the New Testament
  • Table 3
  • 8.4.5 Explanations Advanced for Use of hina in New Testament
  • 8.5 Modern Greek
  • 8.6 Summary
  • CHAPTER 9. Conclusion
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 A Relevance Theoretic Approach to hina
  • 9.2.1 A Lexical Meaning for hina
  • 9.2.2 Taxonomic Approach to hina
  • 9.2.3 The Combination of hina and a Subjunctive Verb
  • 9.2.4 Diachronic Change in the Use and Frequency of hina
  • 9.2.5 Interpretation of hina Clauses
  • 9.3 Implications of Hypothesis
  • 9.3.1 Implications for Interpretation
  • 9.3.1.1 THE COMBINATION OF hina AND plhrw
  • 9.3.1.2 'IMPERATIVAL' hina
  • 9.3.1.3 THE COMBINATION OF wra WITH A FOLLOWING hina CLAUSE
  • 9.3.1.4 CAUSAL hina
  • 9.3.1.5 hina USED TO INTRODUCE 'RESULT' CLAUSES
  • 9.3.2 Implications for Teaching New Testament Greek
  • 9.4 Concluding Comments and Future Research
  • Bibliography
  • Back Cover

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