Global Perspective on Private Higher Education

Global Perspective on Private Higher Education
 
 
Chandos Publishing
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 21. März 2016
  • |
  • 370 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100898-0 (ISBN)
 

A Global Perspective on Private Higher Education provides a timely review of the significant growth of private higher education in many parts of the world during the last decade. The book is concurrent with significant changes in the external operating environment of private higher education, including government policy and its impact on the ongoing growth of the sector. The title brings together the trends relating to the growth and the decline of private higher education providers, also including the key contributing factors of the changes from 17 countries.


  • Provides a timely review of the significant growth of private higher education in many parts of the world during the last decade
  • Presents the significant changes in the external operating environment of private higher education
  • Brings together the trends relating to the growth and the decline of private higher education providers


Mahsood Shah is an Associate Professor with the University of Newcastle, Australia. In this role Mahsood is responsible for strengthening research capacity with staff who are engaged in teaching open access courses to young and mature age students from various equity groups. His research interests include higher education, student experience, student feedback, student retention and attrition, student engagement in quality assurance, international education, and private higher education.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
Elsevier Science
  • 3,38 MB
978-0-08-100898-0 (9780081008980)
0081008988 (0081008988)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • A Global Perspective on Private Higher Education
  • A Global Perspective on Private Higher Education
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Editors' biography
  • Contributors' biography
  • Preface
  • 1 - The issue of contractible quality, quality assurance, and information asymmetries in higher education
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Noncontractible quality and information imperfections
  • 1.3 Educational providers
  • 1.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • 2 - What role for private higher education in Europe? Reflecting about current patterns and future prospects
  • 2.1 Introduction1
  • 2.2 Private higher education in Europe-how did we get here?
  • 2.3 An overview of the private sector in European HE in the last 15years
  • 2.4 Some stylized facts on private higher education in Europe
  • 2.5 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • 3 - Private higher education in Italy
  • 3.1 Trends in the size of private higher education
  • 3.2 The main legal features of private and public universities
  • 3.3 The academics in the private and public sector
  • 3.4 Tuition fees
  • 3.5 The internal differentiation in the private sector
  • 3.6 The social make-up of public and private universities
  • 3.6.1 Sociodemographic characteristics
  • 3.6.2 Previous school career
  • 3.6.3 University studies
  • 3.6.4 Graduates' performance in higher education
  • 3.7 The occupational outcomes of graduates from private and public universities
  • 3.7.1 Theoretical motivation
  • 3.7.2 Occupational placement
  • 3.7.3 Type and level of occupation
  • 3.7.4 Job satisfaction
  • 3.8 The impact of graduating from a private university on labor market returns
  • 3.9 Conclusions
  • Appendix: data description
  • References
  • 4 - From growth to decline? Demand-absorbing private higher education when demand is over
  • 4.1 Introduction: European and global growth patterns in private higher education
  • 4.2 The changing public-private dynamics
  • 4.3 From the expanding privatized to the contracting publicly funded university
  • 4.4 Higher education expansion and projections for the future: educational contraction and private higher education
  • 4.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Data Appendix
  • 5 - Privately funded higher education providers in the UK: the changing dynamic of the higher education sector
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 The changing landscape of higher education in the United Kingdom
  • 5.3 Context for development of privately funded (or alternative) providers
  • 5.4 Mapping privately funded providers in the UK
  • 5.5 Some specific features of privately funded providers and provision in the UK
  • 5.6 Unbundling and varied public-private partnerships
  • 5.7 Students and privately funded providers
  • 5.8 Governance arrangements among privately funded providers
  • 5.8.1 Strategic control
  • 5.8.2 Board membership, size, and committees
  • 5.8.3 Academic governance and staff/student involvement
  • 5.8.4 Information disclosure and reporting
  • 5.8.5 Governance codes
  • 5.9 Impact of privately funded providers on the UK higher education sector?
  • 5.10 Conclusions
  • References
  • 6 - The evolution of a new hybrid organizational form in Chinese higher education: an institutionalist analysis
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Theoretical framework and method
  • 6.3 Deinstitutionalization of the public monopoly in Chinese higher education
  • 6.4 The process of institutionalization of the new hybrid organizational form
  • 6.5 Growing fast in uncertainty
  • 6.6 Regulation and legitimacy
  • 6.7 Conflicts and contesting norms and cultures
  • 6.8 Solutions to incompatibility and new norms in the making
  • 6.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • 7 - A great leap forward: changes and challenges for private higher education in Hong Kong
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Rationales for privatization of higher education
  • 7.2.1 The trend toward massification
  • 7.2.2 The association between internationalization and commodification
  • 7.3 The pathways to privatization
  • 7.3.1 Introducing the self-financing sector
  • 7.3.2 Developing transnational higher education
  • 7.4 Challenges ahead
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • 8 - Private higher education institutions in Malaysia
  • 8.1 Preamble: the role of private higher education institutions (HEIs): historical background
  • 8.2 Mindsets of the ruling elites
  • 8.3 First mindset change
  • 8.4 Vision 2020 and national framework of development
  • 8.5 ICT literate knowledge society and the knowledge economy
  • 8.6 The multimedia Super Corridor and the digital era
  • 8.7 Multimedia Super Corridor and biotechnology initiatives
  • 8.8 Education development plan 2001-10: generating educational excellence through collaborative planning
  • 8.9 Private sector schools and private sector colleges and universities
  • 8.10 Edupreneurs and private universities
  • 8.11 Niches of knowledge creation in Malaysian universities COEs
  • 8.12 The vision and mission of the ministry of higher education (MOHE)
  • 8.13 Leading stakeholders of private university colleges and universities
  • 8.14 The second mindset change
  • 8.15 The review of curriculum
  • 8.16 Leadership and collaboration between public universities and private universities
  • 8.17 Improving the quality of higher education
  • 8.18 Learning outcomes in the MQF
  • 8.19 The quality assurance agenda
  • 8.20 SETARA: brief historical background
  • 8.21 Objective
  • 8.22 Framework and instrument design
  • 8.23 The framework of the instrument
  • 8.24 Rationale for the indicators in the instrument
  • 8.25 The National Accreditation Council and the Malaysian Qualifications Agency
  • 8.26 The way forward
  • 8.27 The educational goals
  • 8.28 Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015-25 (higher education)
  • 8.29 Conclusion
  • 8.30 Closure: food for thought?
  • References
  • 9 - Privatization in higher education in India: a reflection of issues
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Status of universities and government initiatives
  • 9.3 Private universities in India: need of the hour
  • 9.3.1 University Grant Commission Act, 1956, Section 2f: Definition of "University"
  • 9.4 Challenges and suggestions for the way forward
  • 9.5 National Assessment and Accreditation Council
  • 9.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • 10 - Policy and regulation of Australian private higher education
  • 10.1 Identifying the "private" in Australia's private higher education
  • 10.1.1 Private higher education as other and peripheral
  • 10.1.2 The organization of education in Australia
  • 10.2 Understanding the regulatory regime for Australian private higher education providers
  • 10.2.1 Defining policy and policy instruments
  • 10.2.2 The regulatory regime for private providers as a collection of policy instruments
  • 10.2.2.1 Neoliberalism and Australian higher education
  • 10.3 The first regulatory arrangements for private higher education
  • 10.4 States and centralized committees of control
  • 10.5 Changes to the regulatory regime
  • 10.5.1 Counting and categorizing private higher education providers
  • 10.5.1.1 Universities and private higher education providers
  • Anchor 709
  • 10.6 Further developments in private higher education policy
  • 10.7 Conclusion
  • 10.8 A last word: further deregulation of higher education proposed
  • References
  • 11 - Private higher education and graduate employability in Saudi Arabia
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Private higher education in Saudi Arabia
  • 11.3 Higher education and the labor market
  • 11.4 Subjects offered
  • 11.5 The use of English language for instruction
  • 11.6 Practical learning, assessment, and structured work experience
  • 11.7 Structured work experience (internship)
  • 11.8 Career center
  • 11.9 Extracurricular activities
  • 11.10 Conclusion
  • References
  • 12 - The obstacles and challenges of private education in the Sultanate of Oman
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Background
  • 12.3 History of higher education in Oman
  • 12.4 Privatization of education
  • 12.5 Privatization of higher education in the Sultanate of Oman
  • 12.6 Development
  • 12.7 Modes of delivery and programs offered
  • 12.8 Governmental higher education institutions
  • 12.9 Obstacles and challenges
  • 12.10 Conclusion
  • References
  • 13 - The rise of private higher education in Kurdistan
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Factors contributing to the sharp increase in private higher education
  • 13.3 Distinguishing features of private higher educations
  • 13.4 Admissions criteria and student selection at private universities
  • 13.5 Why do students study at private universities?
  • 13.6 Staff-student ratio and quality of academic staff
  • 13.7 Gender inequity
  • 13.8 Regional inequity
  • 13.9 Economic inequity
  • 13.10 The status of private universities before 2009
  • 13.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • 14 - The new state of private universities in Latin America
  • 14.1 The expansive stage of private higher education in Latin America (1980-2000)
  • 14.1.1 Growth with challenges
  • 14.2 The new stage of private education in Latin America (2000-10)
  • 14.3 Conclusions
  • References
  • 15 - Trends in private higher education: the case of Kenya
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Brief history of higher education in Kenya
  • 15.3 Growth of private higher education in Kenya
  • 15.4 University accreditation in Kenya
  • 15.5 Way forward
  • 15.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • 16 - Private universities in Nigeria: prevalence, course offerings, cost, and manpower development
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Structural adjustment program
  • 16.3 Frequent strikes in and closure of federal universities
  • 16.4 The growing demand for university education
  • 16.5 It is common practice all over the world
  • 16.6 Purpose of the study
  • 16.7 Method of investigation
  • 16.8 Data analysis
  • 16.9 Faculty research, productivity, and the presence of journals edited from the university
  • 16.10 Discussion
  • 16.11 Access
  • 16.12 Cost: tuition and fees
  • 16.13 Accreditation
  • 16.14 Course offerings/academic areas of study
  • 16.15 Faculty qualification/training and research
  • 16.16 Conclusion
  • References
  • 17 - Quality and accreditation of private higher education in Ghana
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Ghana as a case study
  • 17.2.1 Background to private higher education in Ghana
  • 17.2.2 Policy reformulation in Ghana/Ghana's University Rationalization Committee
  • 17.2.3 National Accreditation Board of Ghana
  • 17.2.4 Ghana's higher education categories
  • 17.3 Challenges
  • 17.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • 18 - The gainful employment rule and for-profit higher education in the United States
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Gainful employment and access to postsecondary education
  • 18.3 Policies and events leading to the proposed rule
  • 18.4 Purpose and formal provisions of gainful employment
  • 18.5 Defining gainful employment
  • 18.6 Assessing gainful employment
  • 18.7 Institutional reactions to the gainful employment rule
  • 18.7.1 The for-profit higher education sector
  • 18.7.2 The public higher education sector
  • 18.7.3 The private nonprofit education sector
  • 18.8 Policy process
  • 18.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • 19 - Higher education: the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Impact of globalization and internationalization on PHE
  • 19.3 National socioeconomic needs and priorities, job churning and workforce preparation demands as drivers supporting the expan...
  • 19.4 Issues impacting PHE: credibility (legitimacy), quality, quality assurance, and regulatory compliance
  • 19.4.1 Credibility (legitimacy)
  • 19.4.2 Quality
  • 19.4.3 Quality assurance
  • 19.4.4 Regulatory compliance
  • 19.5 Capacities and techniques of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) and PHE: impact and challenge
  • 19.6 Perceived value held by students and other stakeholders
  • 19.7 A counter perspective to PHE growth
  • 19.8 Where to from here?
  • 19.9 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • Y
  • Z
  • Back Cover

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