Researching Religious Education: Classroom Processes and Outcomes

 
 
Waxmann Verlag GmbH
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 1. Dezember 2017
  • |
  • 424 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF ohne DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-8309-8719-2 (ISBN)
 
The question of how research on structures and outcomes in Religious Education can be carried out successfully is of current interest in many countries. Next to the more traditional historical, analytical and, more recently, international comparative approaches, empirical research in religious education has been able to establish itself as a major approach to this field. Moreover, the contemporary discussion about comparative evaluation in schools has raised a number of questions which also refer to Religious Education. What competences can pupils acquire in this subject? Does Religious Education really support the acquisition and development of the competences aspired? Are there differences in this respect between different forms of Religious Education or between different approaches to teaching?
With contributions from eight European countries, the volume brings together approaches and research experiences that try to follow this lead by offering new and empirically based perspectives for the future improvement of teaching and learning in this school subject.
Whoever is interested in improving the practice of Religious Education then, will not be able to bypass the question of researching processes and outcomes - an insight which also refers to a small but growing number of studies in this field which can be identified in several countries.
  • Englisch
  • 4,34 MB
978-3-8309-8719-2 (9783830987192)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Book Cover / Buchtitel [Seite 1]
1.1 - Contents / Inhalt [Seite 5]
2 - Introduction (Friedrich Schweitzer, Reinhold Boschki) [Seite 9]
2.1 - 1. The focus on processes and outcomes in Religious Education [Seite 9]
2.2 - 2. The wider background: religious education as a research discipline [Seite 11]
2.3 - 3. Aims of the volume [Seite 13]
2.4 - 4. The institutional research context for religious education at the University of Tübingen [Seite 14]
2.5 - 5. How the volume developed [Seite 15]
2.6 - 6. The breakdown of the book [Seite 16]
2.7 - 7. Terminology [Seite 16]
2.8 - 8. A note of thanks [Seite 17]
2.9 - References [Seite 17]
3 - Nested Identity and Religious Education Some Methodological Considerations (James C. Conroy) [Seite 23]
3.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 23]
3.2 - 2. The nature of the task [Seite 25]
3.3 - 3. Methodological Overview [Seite 27]
3.4 - 4. The Professionals - Delphi [Seite 31]
3.5 - 5. Being in Schools - An Ethnographic Approach [Seite 34]
3.6 - 6. The Iterative Process [Seite 39]
3.7 - 7. Conclusions [Seite 40]
3.8 - References [Seite 41]
4 - How Can Religion and Lifeworld Come into Dialogue with Each Other? A Research Project by the Essen Religious Education Research Group (Rudolf Englert) [Seite 43]
4.1 - 1. The origins of the study [Seite 43]
4.2 - 2. The aim of the project [Seite 44]
4.3 - 3. Strategic decisions [Seite 45]
4.4 - 4. Basic characteristics of the research design [Seite 46]
4.5 - 5. The research instruments [Seite 47]
4.5.1 - a) The rating instrument [Seite 47]
4.5.2 - b) The instrument of the expertise of correlation [Seite 50]
4.5.3 - c) The instrument of the case analysis [Seite 52]
4.6 - 6. Selected results of the study [Seite 53]
4.6.1 - a) A practice-based typology of patterns of orchestration in Religious Education [Seite 53]
4.6.2 - b) The observation of a tendency towards a descriptive rather than personally engaging type of Religious Education [Seite 54]
4.6.3 - c) The observation of weaknesses in the field of cognitive activation [Seite 54]
4.7 - References [Seite 55]
5 - Measuring Religious Competence: The Berlin Study (Henning Schluß, Joachim Willems, Christine Salmen) [Seite 57]
5.1 - 1. Background [Seite 57]
5.2 - 2. The Study [Seite 58]
5.2.1 - The Model of Religious Competence [Seite 58]
5.2.2 - The Construction of Testable Tasks [Seite 60]
5.3 - 3. The Survey [Seite 62]
5.4 - 4. Further results [Seite 65]
5.5 - 5. Implementation [Seite 69]
5.6 - References [Seite 70]
6 - Researching Selective Traditions in Religious Education in Swedish Middle School. Delayed Meetings with "the World", its Religions, and Existential Dimensions (Christina Osbeck) [Seite 73]
6.1 - 1. Research context [Seite 74]
6.1.1 - Social Studies and Religious Education [Seite 74]
6.1.2 - Selections within the Religious Education field [Seite 76]
6.2 - 2. Methodology of the empirical study [Seite 77]
6.2.1 - Selective traditions [Seite 77]
6.2.2 - Purpose, research questions and material [Seite 77]
6.3 - 3. Selective traditions concerning content I: Religious Education and the other Social Studies subjects [Seite 78]
6.3.1 - Teachers' perspectives concerning the balance of the Social Studies subjects [Seite 79]
6.3.2 - Selections in Social Studies subjects reflected in pupils' perspectives on important content [Seite 79]
6.4 - 4. Selective traditions concerning content II: Religious Education and selections within the subject [Seite 80]
6.4.1 - Teachers' perspectives concerning the balance of content within Religious Education [Seite 81]
6.4.2 - Selections in Religious Education reflected in pupils' perspectives on important content [Seite 82]
6.5 - 5. Selective traditions concerning working methods: Religious Education and selections within the subject [Seite 83]
6.5.1 - Teachers' perspectives concerning frequently used working methods in Religious Education [Seite 83]
6.5.2 - Selections in Religious Education reflected in pupils' perspectives on important working methods [Seite 84]
6.6 - 6. Concluding discussion [Seite 84]
6.7 - References [Seite 87]
7 - Researching Approaches to Religious Education. The Example of Performative Religious Education (Martina Kumlehn) [Seite 89]
7.1 - 1. The project in the context of empirical research [Seite 89]
7.2 - 2. The project in the context of the debate on performative Religious Education [Seite 90]
7.3 - 3. Research design and methodology [Seite 91]
7.4 - 4. Illustrative insights into a case example [Seite 94]
7.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 101]
7.6 - References [Seite 102]
8 - Religious Education and Dialogue in Contextual Perspective. A Comparative Case Study in Hamburg and Duisburg (Germany) (Thorsten Knauth, Dörthe Vieregge) [Seite 105]
8.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 105]
8.2 - 2. Methodology, methods, and terminology [Seite 107]
8.3 - 3. Results [Seite 109]
8.3.1 - Similarities at the semantic level [Seite 109]
8.3.2 - Differences at the pragmatic level [Seite 110]
8.3.3 - Differences at the syntactic level and the impact of the contextual setting [Seite 111]
8.4 - 4. Discussion: balancing tensions as a key task of dialogical practice [Seite 113]
8.5 - References [Seite 114]
9 - Video Analysis. Opening the Black Box of Teaching Religious Education (Ulrich Riegel) [Seite 117]
9.1 - 1. The Technique of Video Analysis [Seite 117]
9.1.1 - 1.1 Terminology [Seite 118]
9.1.2 - 1.2 Benefits and Obstacles [Seite 119]
9.1.3 - 1.3 Practice [Seite 120]
9.2 - 2. Video Analysis in Religious Education [Seite 122]
9.2.1 - 2.1 Video analysis as case study [Seite 123]
9.2.2 - 2.2 Video analysis by qualitative methods [Seite 124]
9.2.3 - 2.3 Video analysis by quantifying methods [Seite 125]
9.3 - 3. Conclusion [Seite 126]
9.4 - References [Seite 128]
10 - Controversial Issues in Religious Education: How Teachers Deal with Terrorism in their Teaching (Trine Anker, Marie von der Lippe) [Seite 131]
10.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 131]
10.2 - 2. RE and Controversial Issues [Seite 132]
10.3 - 3. July 22 in school [Seite 134]
10.4 - 4. Methods and materials [Seite 135]
10.5 - 5. No joint strategy [Seite 136]
10.6 - 6. Lack of time and expertise [Seite 137]
10.7 - 7. Different teaching approaches [Seite 137]
10.8 - 8. Discussion [Seite 140]
10.9 - References [Seite 142]
11 - Effectiveness of Innovative Ways of Inclusive RE in the Netherlands (Ina ter Avest) [Seite 145]
11.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 145]
11.1.1 - The end of the Dutch 'pillarised' society [Seite 146]
11.1.2 - Mono-, multi-, inter-religious: what's in a name? [Seite 146]
11.2 - 2. Islam in mono-religious education [Seite 147]
11.2.1 - 'Diversity - the key to peace' [Seite 147]
11.2.2 - 'Every child matters' [Seite 149]
11.2.3 - 'A bird with two wings' [Seite 150]
11.3 - 3. Islam in multi-religious education [Seite 151]
11.4 - 4. Islam in inter-religious education [Seite 154]
11.4.1 - 'Child in context' [Seite 154]
11.5 - 5. Effective Religious Education [Seite 156]
11.6 - 6. Conclusion and recommendations [Seite 156]
11.7 - References [Seite 157]
12 - Empirical Research on Religion Teachers. A Triangulated Study in the Evangelical Church in the Rhineland (Martin Rothgangel in cooperation with Philipp Klutz and Christhard Lück) [Seite 161]
12.1 - 1. Design, method, and context of the study [Seite 161]
12.2 - 2. Perspectives and experiences of Religious Education teachers regarding classroom processes [Seite 163]
12.2.1 - 2.1 Pupil-oriented classroom processes [Seite 163]
12.2.2 - 2.2 Emotional aspects and role conceptualisation when handling interdenominational and interreligious topics [Seite 165]
12.3 - 3. Contextual factors of classroom processes [Seite 167]
12.3.1 - 3.1 The reference field of Religious Education teachers [Seite 167]
12.3.2 - 3.2 The contextual factors of (dis-)satisfaction [Seite 171]
12.4 - 4. The pupils and the form of Religious Education [Seite 173]
12.4.1 - 4.1 The pupils in Protestant Religious Education [Seite 174]
12.4.2 - 4.2 Reasons for the abandonment of denominational separation in Religious Education [Seite 174]
12.4.3 - 4.3 Attitudes to different forms of Religious Education [Seite 175]
12.5 - 5. Outlook [Seite 175]
12.6 - References [Seite 176]
13 - How Teachers Deal with Religious Plurality in Denominational Religious Education. A Research Project in the Northernmost State of Germany (Uta Pohl-Patalong) [Seite 179]
13.1 - 1. The Reason for conducting the ReVikoR Study [Seite 179]
13.2 - 2. The design of the ReVikoR Study [Seite 180]
13.3 - 3. Religious plurality as a natural part of denominational Religious Education [Seite 182]
13.4 - 4. Didactic strategies in dealing with religious plurality [Seite 183]
13.4.1 - (1) "There is a common ground" - An increased consideration of topics which apply to more than one religion [Seite 183]
13.4.2 - (2) "That you think about what values these religions pass on" - World religions as a topic [Seite 184]
13.4.3 - (3) "Then I could always rely on insider knowledge" - Interreligious and inter-denominational learning [Seite 184]
13.4.4 - (4) "To get the others on board" - Religious multi-perspectivity [Seite 185]
13.4.5 - (5) "So you just always have to start from scratch" - Religious Education and religious literacy [Seite 185]
13.4.6 - (6) "I really just make sure not to get too biblical and too Protestant or Christian" - Holding back on the Christian denominational profile [Seite 186]
13.4.7 - (7) "I have to teach them the same topics" - Lesson planning without considering religious diversity [Seite 187]
13.5 - 5. How do teachers picture the future of Religious Education? [Seite 187]
13.6 - 6. Conclusion [Seite 190]
13.7 - References [Seite 191]
14 - Researching Classroom Processes and Outcomes in Religious Education. The Need for Intervention Studies (Friedrich Schweitzer) [Seite 195]
14.1 - 1. Reasons for researching classroom processes and outcomes in Religious Education [Seite 195]
14.2 - 2. Topics of research: The example of interreligious education and values education [Seite 199]
14.3 - 3. The design of intervention studies and its usefulness for Religious Education [Seite 202]
14.4 - 4. Conclusions [Seite 205]
14.5 - References [Seite 206]
15 - Interreligious Learning Through Perspective-Taking. An Intervention Study (Martin Losert, Magda Bräuer, Friedrich Schweitzer) [Seite 209]
15.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 209]
15.1.1 - 1.1 The need for empirical research on interreligious learning [Seite 210]
15.1.2 - 1.2 Interreligious competence [Seite 211]
15.1.3 - 1.3 Research goals and overview [Seite 214]
15.2 - 2. Method [Seite 215]
15.2.1 - 2.1 Recruitment, research design, and procedure [Seite 215]
15.2.2 - 2.2 Teaching units [Seite 217]
15.2.3 - 2.3 The questionnaire [Seite 218]
15.3 - 3. Results [Seite 221]
15.3.1 - 3.1 Sample [Seite 221]
15.3.2 - 3.2 Factor analyses [Seite 222]
15.3.3 - 3.3 Measurement scales and variables [Seite 229]
15.3.4 - 3.4 Learning effects [Seite 230]
15.4 - 4. Discussion [Seite 235]
15.5 - References [Seite 236]
15.6 - Appendix [Seite 239]
16 - Interreligious Competence for Kindergarten Teachers in Education (Friederike Strohm, Rebecca Nowack) [Seite 245]
16.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 245]
16.1.1 - 1.1 Aims of the study [Seite 245]
16.1.2 - 1.2 How the study was conducted [Seite 246]
16.2 - 2. How the study was conducted [Seite 248]
16.2.1 - 2.1 Design, methods and sample [Seite 248]
16.2.2 - 2.2 Teaching units [Seite 249]
16.2.3 - 2.3 Measurements [Seite 250]
16.3 - 3. Preliminary results [Seite 251]
16.3.1 - 3.1 Qualitative analysis [Seite 252]
16.3.2 - 3.2 Quantitative analysis [Seite 253]
16.4 - 4. Discussion [Seite 255]
16.5 - References [Seite 255]
17 - Training Future Caregivers Through Religious Education. An Intervention Study (Martin Losert) [Seite 257]
17.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 257]
17.2 - 2. Method [Seite 257]
17.2.1 - 2.1 Recruitment, research design, and procedure [Seite 257]
17.2.2 - 2.2 Teaching units [Seite 258]
17.2.3 - 2.3 Questionnaire [Seite 258]
17.3 - 3. Results [Seite 260]
17.3.1 - 3.1 Sample [Seite 260]
17.3.2 - 3.2 Factor analysis [Seite 261]
17.3.3 - 3.3 Learning effects [Seite 265]
17.4 - 4. Discussion [Seite 268]
17.5 - References [Seite 269]
17.6 - Appendix [Seite 271]
18 - Values in Religious Education. An Intervention Study (Friederike Strohm, Georg Wagensommer) [Seite 273]
18.1 - 1. Design and methods [Seite 273]
18.1.1 - 1.1 Procedure and sample [Seite 274]
18.1.2 - 1.2 Teaching units [Seite 275]
18.1.3 - 1.3 Measurements [Seite 277]
18.2 - 2. Results [Seite 280]
18.2.1 - 2.1 Interest [Seite 280]
18.2.2 - 2.2 Value Orientations [Seite 281]
18.2.3 - 2.3 Moral reasoning [Seite 281]
18.3 - 3. Discussion [Seite 282]
18.4 - References [Seite 283]
19 - Researching Religious Education in Finland (Antti Räsänen) [Seite 287]
19.1 - 1. Introduction: From catechetics to religious education [Seite 287]
19.2 - 2. Paradigms and paradigm change [Seite 291]
19.3 - 3. The paradigms of Finnish Religious Education [Seite 292]
19.4 - 4. Discussion [Seite 299]
19.5 - References [Seite 300]
20 - Empirical Research in Austria (Martin Rothgangel, Robert Schelander) [Seite 303]
20.1 - 1. Historical perspectives [Seite 303]
20.2 - 2. Conditioning factors of Religious Education [Seite 305]
20.2.1 - 2.1 Religious plurality and religious minorities [Seite 305]
20.2.2 - 2.2 Curriculum and textbook analyses [Seite 306]
20.2.3 - 2.3 Studies on the organisational form of religious and ethical education [Seite 306]
20.3 - 3. Research on pupils [Seite 306]
20.3.1 - 3.1 Pupils' perceptions of Religious Education [Seite 307]
20.3.2 - 3.2 Empirical studies of the religiosity, values and happiness of young people and children [Seite 307]
20.4 - 4. Studies of Religious Education teachers [Seite 307]
20.4.1 - 4.1 Prelude: Religious Education teachers in the big city [Seite 308]
20.4.2 - 4.2 Main focus: professional satisfaction [Seite 308]
20.4.3 - 4.3 Further studies [Seite 309]
20.5 - 5. Education research in the narrower sense [Seite 309]
20.6 - 6. General research in schools and religious educational research beyond schools [Seite 310]
20.7 - 7. Summary considerations [Seite 311]
20.8 - References [Seite 312]
21 - Researching Religious Education in Switzerland. Empirical Research in the Context of Current "Didactic Paradigm"-Debates (Thomas Schlag) [Seite 317]
21.1 - 1. Reasons for the lack of empirical research on Religious Education in Switzerland [Seite 317]
21.1.1 - 1) Cooperation of state and church: No need for plausibility checks of RE [Seite 317]
21.1.2 - 2) Lack of profile of academic religious education [Seite 318]
21.1.3 - 3) RE - not a "regular" subject and not sufficiently interesting [Seite 319]
21.1.4 - 4) The Churches' lack of interest and their political silence [Seite 319]
21.2 - 2. The current situation of Religious Education in Switzerland - the shift to new forms of Religious Education in schools [Seite 320]
21.2.1 - 1) The pluralism-argument [Seite 320]
21.2.2 - 2) The secularisation-argument [Seite 321]
21.2.3 - 3) The dissatisfaction-argument [Seite 321]
21.3 - 3. Starting points of empirical research [Seite 322]
21.3.1 - 1) RE-teachers in the Cantone Berne (2004) [Seite 322]
21.3.2 - 2) Evaluation of Islamic Religious Education (2004) [Seite 323]
21.3.3 - 3) Arguing for an obligatory RE in the context of "teaching about" (2004ff.) [Seite 323]
21.3.4 - 4) Teacher motivations in confessional RE (2009) [Seite 324]
21.3.5 - 5) Subject-oriented and competence-based religious didactics (2010) [Seite 325]
21.3.6 - 6) The societal relevance of RE and the responsibility for it (2010) [Seite 325]
21.3.7 - 7) Assessing RE teacher trainers (2016) [Seite 326]
21.4 - 4. Conclusions and future empirical perspectives - How to interpret classroom processes in a "teaching about"-context [Seite 326]
21.4.1 - 1) Teacher's training [Seite 327]
21.4.2 - 2) REMEMBER - An international comparative study on the Teaching of the Holocaust in RE [Seite 327]
21.4.3 - 3) Teaching Islam in RE - An international comparative study [Seite 327]
21.5 - References [Seite 328]
22 - The Micro- and Macro-Politics of the Classroom and of Classroom Research. The Case of Denmark (Mette Buchardt) [Seite 331]
22.1 - 1. The scientification of public educational debate [Seite 331]
22.2 - 2. The politics of classroom research [Seite 332]
22.3 - 3. A concept for the classroom within curriculum as an extensive social practice [Seite 335]
22.4 - 4. Classroom research in religion and school as social practice - and politico-scientific challenges of future research [Seite 337]
22.5 - References [Seite 340]
23 - Current State of Research on Islamic Religious Education in Germany (Fahimah Ulfat) [Seite 343]
23.1 - 1. The term "Islamic religious education (Islamische Religionspädagogik)" [Seite 343]
23.2 - 2. The Development of Islamic religious education as a scientific discipline in Germany [Seite 346]
23.3 - 3. Current situation of the subject "Islamic Religious Education" [Seite 348]
23.3.1 - a. Systematic-theoretical religious education research [Seite 348]
23.3.2 - b. Historical research on religious education [Seite 352]
23.3.3 - c. Empirical research on religious education [Seite 355]
23.3.4 - d. Evaluative Research [Seite 357]
23.3.5 - e. International comparative research [Seite 363]
23.4 - 4. Conclusion [Seite 364]
23.5 - References [Seite 366]
24 - Conclusions (Reinhold Boschki, Friedrich Schweitzer) [Seite 373]
24.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 373]
24.2 - 2. Researching processes and outcomes in Religious Education [Seite 374]
24.3 - 3. General observations [Seite 377]
24.4 - 4. Perspectives for the future [Seite 379]
24.5 - References [Seite 380]
25 - Appendix [Seite 383]
25.1 - The Tübingen Institutes of Vocation-Oriented Religious Education. An Overview of Empirical Studies (Reinhold Boschki, Matthias Gronover, Christoph Knoblauch, Hanne Schnabel-Henke, Friedrich Schweitzer) [Seite 385]
25.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 385]
25.1.2 - 2. Examples: Additional research projects carried out at the Tübingen Institutes [Seite 386]
25.1.2.1 - RE teachers' spirituality: a qualitative teacher study [Seite 386]
25.1.2.2 - Development of Religious and Interreligious Competence in Early Childhood Education: A Qualitative Explorative Study [Seite 388]
25.1.2.3 - New organisational models for RE in vocational schools [Seite 390]
25.1.2.4 - The denominational character of RE: A Delphi-Study [Seite 391]
25.1.3 - References [Seite 392]
25.2 - Questionnaire: Interreligious Competence (Future bank employees) [Seite 395]
25.3 - Questionnaire: Interreligious Competence (Future Caregivers) [Seite 409]
25.4 - Authors [Seite 421]

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