Smart Grid Standards

Specifications, Requirements, and Technologies
 
 
John Wiley & Sons Inc (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 2. Februar 2015
  • |
  • 484 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-65377-7 (ISBN)
 

A fully comprehensive introduction to smart grid standards and their applications for developers, consumers and service providers

The critical role of standards for smart grid has already been realized by world-wide governments and industrial organizations. There are hundreds of standards for Smart Grid which have been developed in parallel by different organizations.  It is therefore necessary to arrange those standards in such a way that it is easier for readers to easily understand and select a particular standard according to their requirements without going into the depth of each standard, which often spans from hundreds to thousands of pages.

The book will allow people in the smart grid areas and in the related industries to easily understand the fundamental standards of smart grid, and quickly find the building-block standards they need from hundreds of standards for implementing a smart grid system. The authors highlight the most advanced works and efforts now under way to realize an integrated and interoperable smart grid, such as the “NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Release 2.0”, the” IEC Smart Grid Standardization Roadmap”, the ISO/IEC’s “Smart Grid Standards for Residential Customers”, the ZigBee/HomePlug’s “Smart Energy Profile Specification 2.0”, IEEE’s P2030 “Draft Guide for Smart Grid Interoperability of Energy Technology and Information Technology Operation with the Electric Power System (EPS), and End-Use Applications and Loads”, and the latest joint research project results between the world’s two largest economies, US and China. The book enables readers to fully understand the latest achievements and ongoing technical works of smart grid standards, and assist industry utilities, vendors, academia, regulators, and other smart grid stakeholders in future decision making.

The book begins with an overview of the smart grid, and introduces the opportunities in both developed and developing countries.  It then examines the standards for power grid domain of the smart grid, including standards for blackout prevention and energy management, smart transmission, advanced distribution management and automation, smart substation automation, and condition monitoring. Communication and security standards as a whole are the backbone of smart grid and their standards, including those for wired and wireless communications, are then assessed. Finally the authors consider the standards and on-going work and efforts for interoperability and integration between different standards and networks, including the latest joint research effort between the world’s two largest economies, US and China.  

  • A fully comprehensive introduction to smart grid standards and their applications for developers, consumers and service providers
  • Covers all up-to-date standards of smart grid, including the key standards from NIST, IEC, ISO ZigBee, IEEE, HomePlug, SAE, and other international and regional standardization organizations. The Appendix summarizes all of the standards mentioned in the book
  • Presents standards for renewable energy and smart generation, covering wind energy, solar voltaic, fuel cells, pumped storage, distributed generation, and nuclear generation standards. Standards for other alternative sources of energy such as geothermal energy, and bioenergy are briefly introduced
  • Introduces the standards for smart storage and plug-in electric vehicles, including standards for distributed energy resources (DER), electric storage, and E-mobility/plug-in vehicles

The book is written in an accessible style, ideal as an introduction to the topic, yet contains sufficient detail and research to appeal to the more advanced and specialist reader.



Takuro Sato
Waseda University, Japan

Daniel M. Kammen
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Bin Duan
Xiangtan University, China

Martin Macuha
France Telecom Japan Co. Ltd., Japan

Zhenyu Zhou
North China Electric Power University,
China

Jun Wu
Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Solomon Abebe Asfaw
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Muhammad Tariq
FAST National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Pakistan

  • Englisch
  • Singapore
  • |
  • Singapur
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 9,85 MB
978-1-118-65377-7 (9781118653777)
1118653777 (1118653777)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1 An Overview of the Smart Grid
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 An Overview of Smart Grid-Related Organizations
  • 1.2.1 SDOs Dealing with the Smart Grid
  • 1.2.2 Technical Consortia, Forums, and Panels Dealing with the Smart Grid
  • 1.2.3 Other Political, Market, and Trade Organizations, Forums, and Alliances
  • 1.3 Status of the United States (US)
  • 1.3.1 Strategy Development and Planning
  • 1.3.2 Policy and Law Enforcement
  • 1.3.3 Government and Company Pilot Projects
  • 1.4 Status of the European Union (EU)
  • 1.4.1 Activities of the European Union
  • 1.4.2 Activities of EU Member Countries
  • 1.5 Status of Japan
  • 1.6 Status of South Korea
  • 1.7 Status of China
  • 1.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Renewable Energy Generation
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Renewable Energy Systems and the Smart Grid
  • 2.2.1 Hydroelectric Power
  • 2.2.2 Solar Energy
  • 2.2.3 Wind Energy
  • 2.2.4 Fuel Cell
  • 2.2.5 Geothermal Energy
  • 2.2.6 Biomass
  • 2.3 Challenges of Renewable Energy Systems
  • 2.3.1 High Capital Cost
  • 2.3.2 Integrating Renewable to the On-Grid
  • 2.3.3 Reliable Supply of Power
  • 2.3.4 Power Transmission
  • 2.3.5 Power Distribution
  • 2.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Power Grid
  • 3.1 Power Grid Systems
  • 3.2 An Overview of the Important Key Standards for the Power Grid
  • 3.3 Communications in the Smart Grid
  • 3.3.1 Communications for Substations: IEC 61850 Standards
  • 3.3.2 Communications for Telecontrol: IEC 60870-5 Standards
  • 3.3.3 Inter-Control Center Communications: IEC 60870-6 Standards
  • 3.4 Energy Management Systems
  • 3.4.1 Application Program Interface: the IEC 61970 Standards
  • 3.4.2 Software Inter-Application Integration: the IEC 61968 Standards
  • 3.5 Teleprotection Equipment
  • 3.5.1 An Overview of the IEC 60834
  • 3.5.2 Types of Teleprotection Command Schemes
  • 3.5.3 Requirements for Command Type Teleprotection Systems
  • 3.5.4 Teleprotection System Performance Requirements
  • 3.5.5 Teleprotection System Performance Tests
  • 3.6 Application Cases of Related Standards in the Power Grid
  • 3.6.1 Case 1: Engineering Process in Smart Substation Automation
  • 3.6.2 Case 2: Information Exchange Services and Service Tracking
  • 3.7 Analysis of Relationships among Related Standards
  • 3.7.1 IEC 61970 and IEC 61968
  • 3.7.2 IEC 61850 and IEC 61970
  • 3.7.3 IEC 61850 and IEC 60870
  • 3.7.4 TASE.2 and MMS
  • 3.7.5 Latest Progresses of Related Standards
  • 3.8 Conclusion
  • Appendix 3.A A SED File Example (Extensible Markup Language)
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Smart Storage and Electric Vehicles
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Electric Storage
  • 4.2.1 An Overview of Electric Storage
  • 4.2.2 Electric Storage Technologies and Applications
  • 4.2.3 Standardization Projects and Efforts
  • 4.3 Distributed Energy Resources
  • 4.3.1 An Overview of Distributed Energy Resources
  • 4.3.2 Technologies and Applications
  • 4.3.3 Various Standardization Processes and Projects
  • 4.4 E-Mobility/Electric Vehicles
  • 4.4.1 Introduction of E-Mobility/Electric Vehicles
  • 4.4.2 The Rise and Fall of Electric Vehicles
  • 4.4.3 Types of Electric Vehicles
  • 4.4.4 Electric Vehicle Batteries
  • 4.4.5 Grid to Vehicle (G2V) and Vehicle to Grid (V2G) Opportunities and Challenges
  • 4.4.6 Standardization of E-Mobility/Electric Vehicles
  • 4.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Smart Energy Consumption
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Demand Response
  • 5.2.1 An Overview of Demand Response Technologies
  • 5.2.2 Demand Response Technology and Barriers
  • 5.2.3 Standardization Efforts Related to Demand Response
  • 5.3 Advanced Metering Infrastructure Standards
  • 5.3.1 The AMI System
  • 5.3.2 The IEC 62056 and ANSI C12 Standards
  • 5.3.3 Metering Standardization Projects and Efforts
  • 5.4 Smart Home and Building Automation Standards
  • 5.4.1 ISO/IEC Information Technology-Home Electronic System (HES)
  • 5.4.2 ZigBee/HomePlug Smart Energy Profile 2.0
  • 5.4.3 OpenHAN 2.0
  • 5.4.4 Z-Wave
  • 5.4.5 ECHONET
  • 5.4.6 ZigBee Home Automation Public Application Profile
  • 5.4.7 BACnet
  • 5.4.8 LONWORKS
  • 5.4.9 INSTEON
  • 5.4.10 KNX
  • 5.4.11 ONE-NET
  • 5.4.12 A Comparison of Smart Home and Building Automation Standards
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Communications in the Smart Grid
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.1.1 Communication Requirements for the Smart Grid
  • 6.1.2 List of Standards
  • 6.2 Architecture of the Communication System in the Smart Grid
  • 6.2.1 IP in the Smart Grid
  • 6.3 Wired Communication
  • 6.3.1 Power Line Communication
  • 6.3.2 Optical Communication
  • 6.3.3 Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) and Ethernet
  • 6.4 Wireless Communication
  • 6.4.1 Introduction
  • 6.4.2 Wireless Very Short Distance Communication
  • 6.4.3 Wireless Personal and Local Area Networks and Related Technologies in the Unlicensed Spectrum
  • 6.4.4 Cellular Networks in the Licensed Spectrum and WiMAX Technology
  • 6.4.5 Satellite Communication
  • 6.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Security and Safety for Standardized Smart Grid Networks
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Threats and Vulnerabilities of Smart Grids
  • 7.2.1 Network Vulnerabilities
  • 7.2.2 Errors of Communications
  • 7.3 Communication Network Standards of Smart Grids
  • 7.3.1 Wireless Network Standards
  • 7.3.2 Wired Network Standards and Their Safety Extensions
  • 7.4 Wireless Network Security Mechanisms in the Smart Grids
  • 7.4.1 An Overview of Security Mechanisms in the Wireless Standardized Smart Grid
  • 7.4.2 Device Joining
  • 7.4.3 Securing Normal Traffic
  • 7.5 Wired Network Security/Safety Mechanisms in the Smart Grid
  • 7.5.1 An Overview of Security Technologies in the Wired Smart Grid
  • 7.5.2 Basic Security Mechanisms of Communication Infrastructure
  • 7.5.3 Principles of Safety Extensions
  • 7.5.4 Security Measures of Safety Extension
  • 7.6 Typical Standards of Functional Security and Safety
  • 7.6.1 IEC 62351 Standards
  • 7.6.2 IEC 61508 Standards
  • 7.7 Discussion
  • 7.7.1 Safety versus Security
  • 7.7.2 Security Level
  • 7.7.3 Safety Level
  • 7.7.4 Open Issues
  • 7.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Interoperability
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.1.1 Interoperability and Interchangeability
  • 8.1.2 The Challenges of Network Interoperability
  • 8.1.3 Adding Application Interoperability
  • 8.2 Interoperability Standards
  • 8.3 NIST Identified List of Standards to Be Reviewed
  • 8.4 NIST Interoperability
  • 8.5 Conceptual Reference Model for the Smart Grid
  • 8.6 Different Priority Areas Identified for Standardization
  • 8.6.1 Wide-Area Situational Awareness
  • 8.6.2 Demand Response and Consumer Energy Efficiency
  • 8.6.3 Smart Energy Storage
  • 8.6.4 Electric Transportation
  • 8.6.5 Cybersecurity
  • 8.6.6 Network Communications
  • 8.6.7 Advanced Metering Infrastructure
  • 8.6.8 Distribution Grid Management
  • 8.7 Priority Action Plans
  • 8.8 Different Layers of Interoperability
  • 8.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Integration of Variable Renewable Resources
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Challenges of Grid Integration of Intermittent Renewable Systems
  • 9.2.1 Operation of a Conventional Electric Power System
  • 9.2.2 Impact of Adding Intermittent Renewable Systems to the Power Grid
  • 9.3 Transitioning to Highly Renewable Electricity Grid
  • 9.3.1 Planning Studies
  • 9.4 Very High Penetration and Grid-Scale Storage
  • 9.4.1 Grid-Matching Analysis-Case of the Israeli Grid
  • 9.4.2 Storage Design and Dispatch-Case of Interconnected Grid
  • 9.5 List of Standards Related to Integration of Renewable Resources
  • 9.6 Conclusion and Recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Future of the Smart Grid
  • 10.1 The Premise of the Smart Grid
  • 10.2 What the Smart Grid Should Deliver?
  • 10.2.1 Clean Electricity
  • 10.2.2 System Flexibility
  • 10.2.3 Affordable Service
  • 10.2.4 Reliable and Sustainable Electricity Grid
  • 10.3 Challenges of the Smart Grid
  • 10.3.1 Designing for a Broader Purpose
  • 10.3.2 Operational Challenges
  • 10.3.3 Policy Challenges
  • 10.4 Future Directions
  • 10.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • List of Standards for the Smart Grid
  • Index
  • EULA

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