Sport and the Brain: The Science of Preparing, Enduring and Winning, Part C

The Science of Preparing,Enduring and Winning, Part C
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 31. Oktober 2018
  • |
  • 392 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-444-64188-5 (ISBN)
 

Sport and the Brain: The Science of Preparing, Enduring and Winning, Part C, Volume 240, reflects recent advancements in the understanding of how elite athletes prepare for, and perform at, peak levels under the demands of competition. Topics discussed in this new release include The influence of challenge and threat states on affect, perceived exertion, attention, and performance during a competitive sprint cycling task, Prior self-control exertion and perceptions of pain and task importance during a physically demanding task, Enhancing cardiac vagal activity in sport psychology, The influence of cardiac vagal activity on peripheral perception performance under pressure, and much more.

  • Takes a multidisciplinary approach, focusing on aspects of psychology, neuroscience, skill learning, talent development and physiology
  • Focuses on sports and the brain
  • Contains the expertise of an international panel of contributors
  • Adopts the novel approach of having a target article with critical commentaries on the lessons learned from British multiple gold medalists at Olympic and World Championships
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • Niederlande
  • 12,00 MB
978-0-444-64188-5 (9780444641885)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Sport and the Brain: The Science of Preparing, Enduring and Winning, Part C
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • References
  • Chapter 1: The relationship between challenge and threat states and anaerobic power, core affect, perceived exertion, and ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Method
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Measures
  • 2.2.1. Demand and resource evaluations
  • 2.2.2. Cardiovascular reactivity
  • 2.2.3. Anaerobic power
  • 2.2.4. Core affect
  • 2.2.5. Perceived exertion
  • 2.2.6. Self-focused attention
  • 2.3. Procedure
  • 2.4. Statistical Analysis
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. Task Engagement
  • 3.2. Anaerobic Power
  • 3.3. Core Affect
  • 3.4. Perceived Exertion
  • 3.5. Self-Focused Attention
  • 4. Discussion
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Prior self-control exertion and perceptions of pain and motivation during a physically effortful task
  • 1. Prior Self-Control Exertion and Perceptions of Pain and Motivation During a Physically Demanding Task
  • 2. Methods
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Protocol
  • 2.3. Measures
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. Preliminary Analysis
  • 3.2. Primary Analysis
  • 4. Discussion
  • 4.1. Limitations
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 3: The quiet eye is sensitive to exercise-induced physiological stress
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Methods
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Apparatus
  • 2.3. Measures
  • 2.3.1. Free throw performance
  • 2.3.2. Heart rate
  • 2.3.3. Quiet eye duration
  • 2.4. Procedure
  • 2.4.1. Visit 1: ramp incremental test
  • 2.4.2. Visits 2-5: experimental visits
  • 2.5. Data Analysis
  • 2.5.1. Exercise intensity determination
  • 2.6. Statistical Analysis
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. Heart Rate
  • 3.2. QE Duration
  • 3.3. Free Throw Performance
  • 4. Discussion
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 4: Team ball sport participation is associated with performance in two sustained visual attention tasks: Position ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Method
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Materials
  • 2.3. MOT Task
  • 2.4. RSVP task
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. MOT Task
  • 3.2. RSVP Task
  • 4. Discussion
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 5: Enhancing cardiac vagal activity: Factors of interest for sport psychology
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Cardiac Vagal Activity
  • 1.1.1. Cardiac vagal control and self-regulation
  • 1.1.2. The 3Rs of cardiac vagal control: Resting, Reactivity, and Recovery
  • 1.2. Rationale
  • 1.3. Inclusion Criteria
  • 2. Overview of Methods Enhancing Cardiac Vagal Activity in Sport
  • 2.1. Person
  • 2.1.1. Nutrition
  • 2.1.1.1. Diet
  • 2.1.1.2. Beverages
  • 2.1.1.3. Supplementations
  • 2.1.2. Non-ingestive oral habits
  • 2.1.3. Water immersion
  • 2.1.4. Body temperature reduction
  • 2.1.5. Sleeping habits
  • 2.1.6. Relaxation methods
  • 2.1.7. Cognitive techniques
  • 2.1.8. Praying
  • 2.1.9. Music
  • 2.1.10. Exercise
  • 2.2. Environment
  • 2.2.1. Social environment
  • 2.2.1.1. Contact with humans
  • 2.2.1.2. Contact with animals
  • 2.2.2. Physical environment
  • 2.2.2.1. Aromas
  • 2.2.2.2. Lights
  • 2.2.2.3. Sounds (excluding music)
  • 2.2.2.4. Temperature
  • 2.2.2.5. Outdoor environment
  • 2.2.2.6. Altitude
  • 3. Future Directions
  • 4. Potential Limitations
  • 5. Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 6: The contribution of cardiac vagal activity on peripheral perception under pressure
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Cardiac Vagal Activity
  • 1.2. Cardiac Vagal Activity and Performance
  • 1.3. Peripheral Perception
  • 2. Methodology
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Measures
  • 2.2.1. Cardiac vagal activity
  • 2.2.2. Stress intensity
  • 2.2.3. Pressure items
  • 2.2.4. Motivational item
  • 2.2.5. Peripheral perception
  • 2.3. Procedure
  • 2.3.1. Pre-task
  • 2.3.2. Task
  • 2.3.3. Post-task
  • 2.4. Data Processing and Cleaning
  • 2.5. Data Preparation
  • 2.6. Data Analysis
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. Respiration Control
  • 3.2. Manipulation Checks
  • 3.3. The Contribution of CVA to Peripheral Perception Performance
  • 4. Discussion
  • 4.1. Limitations
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Supplementary Material
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 7: Brain mechanisms that underlie music interventions in the exercise domain
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. The Main Effects of Music During Exercise
  • 1.2. Applications of Music in Exercise
  • 2. Effects of Music on Electrical Activity in the Brain
  • 3. Effects of Music on Subcortical Brain Regions
  • 4. Shining Some (Infra-Red) Light on the Underlying Mechanisms
  • 5. Summary and Recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Do I focus on the process of cycling or try to put my mind elsewhere? A comparison of concentration strategies ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Method
  • 2.1. Participants
  • 2.2. Procedure
  • 2.3. Data Analysis
  • 3. Results
  • 4. Discussion
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 9: Motor imagery, performance and motor rehabilitation
  • 1. Mental Imagery: From Practice to Theory
  • 2. Disentangling Motor Imagery and Definitional Dilemmas
  • 3. Is Motor Imagery Limited by Visual Imagery Perspective?
  • 4. Motor Cognition and Simulation Theory
  • 5. Measurement Issues: Beyond Subjective Self-Report
  • 6. Is Motor Imagery Uncoupled From Action?
  • 7. Does Motor Imagery Provide a Window to Our Emotions?
  • 8. To What Extent Does Our Physical Environment Influence Motor Imagery?
  • 9. Future Pathways for Motor Imagery Research
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 10: eSports: A new window on neurocognitive expertise?
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Rise of eSports
  • 3. Health and Social Benefits of Gaming and eSports
  • 4. Cognitive Benefits of eSports
  • 5. Mechanisms Underlying the Cognitive Benefits of Gaming
  • 6. esports and Expertise: Unexplored Areas
  • 6.1. Biomechanics
  • 6.2. Neurostimulation and Skill Acquisition
  • 7. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11: The cardinal exercise stopper: Muscle fatigue, muscle pain or perception of effort?
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Methods
  • 2.1. Study 1
  • 2.1.1. Participants
  • 2.1.2. Study design and procedures
  • 2.1.2.1. Preliminary visit
  • 2.1.2.2. Main visit
  • 2.1.3. Statistical analysis
  • 2.2. Study 2
  • 2.2.1. Participants
  • 2.2.2. Study design and procedures
  • 2.2.2.1. Preliminary visit
  • 2.2.2.2. Main visit
  • 2.2.3. Statistical analysis
  • 3. Results
  • 3.1. Study 1
  • 3.2. Study 2
  • 4. Discussion
  • 4.1. Muscle Fatigue
  • 4.2. Muscle Pain
  • 4.3. Perception of Effort
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: When research leads to learning, but not action in high performance sport
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Changing Human Behavior in High Performance Sport
  • 3. System Dilemmas
  • 4. Influencing Coaching Behavior With New Knowledge
  • 4.1. A Constraints-Led Approach to Coaching
  • 5. Challenging the Status Quo With Innovation
  • 6. When Knowledge and Application Meet: A Case Study of Sleep in Elite Athletes
  • 7. Conclusion
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 13: Corticospinal excitability during fatiguing whole body exercise
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Significance of the Corticospinal Pathway
  • 3. Evaluating the Excitability of the Corticospinal Pathway
  • 4. Changes in Corticospinal Excitability From Before to After Fatiguing Whole Body Exercise
  • 5. Changes in the Excitability of the Corticospinal Pathway During Fatiguing Whole Body Exercise
  • 6. The Role of Group III/IV Muscle Afferents in Corticospinal Excitability During Fatiguing Whole Body Exercise
  • 7. The Influence of Hypoxia on Corticospinal Excitability During Whole Body Exercise
  • 8. Modulating Motor Cortical Excitability: Implications for Whole Body Exercise Performance
  • 9. Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Studying brain activity in sports performance: Contributions and issues
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Only a Few Neuroimaging Methods for Studying Brain Activity in Sports Environments
  • 3. Current Contributions of fNIRS and EEG Methods in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  • 3.1. The Acute Effects of Single Bouts of Exercise on Brain Activity
  • 3.2. The Effects of Training Interventions on Brain Activity During Exercise
  • 4. Methodological Issues, Limitations and Possible Advances in EEG and fNIRS
  • 4.1. Montage and Localization
  • 4.2. Real Exercise Conditions
  • 4.3. Spatial Resolution
  • 5. Toward New Brain Applications in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  • 5.1. Neurofeedback and Virtual Reality
  • 5.2. Combining With Transcranial Electrical Stimulation
  • 5.3. Sport-Related Concussion
  • 6. Conclusion
  • Funding
  • Conflict of Interest
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 15: The influence of thermal inputs on brain regulation of exercise: An evolutionary perspective
  • 1. Introduction: Thermoregulation as a Performance Strategy
  • 2. Defining Conditions: Heat as a Determining Factor in the Evolution of Human Performance
  • 3. The Brain, Redundancy and Neuroprotection
  • 4. Efferent Drive and Heat Strain
  • 5. Endurance Pacing and Heat Stress
  • 6. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: The effects of mental fatigue on sport-related performance
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Studying Mental Fatigue in the Laboratory
  • 2.1. How to Induce Mental Fatigue?
  • 2.2. How to Quantify Mental Fatigue?
  • 3. Mental Fatigue Impairs Endurance Performance
  • 3.1. Constant-Load Exercise
  • 3.2. Incremental Exercise
  • 3.3. Self-paced Exercise
  • 3.4. Interaction Between Mental Fatigue, Environmental Manipulations and Endurance Performance
  • 3.5. How to Explain the Negative Impact of Mental Fatigue on Endurance Performance?
  • 4. Mental Fatigue Does Not Reduce Maximal Force, Power or Speed Production
  • 4.1. Effects on Isolated Exercise
  • 4.2. Effects on Whole-Body Exercise
  • 5. Mental Fatigue Alters Motor Skills Performance
  • 5.1. Mental Fatigue Alters the Speed-Accuracy Trade-off
  • 5.2. Mental Fatigue Alters Specific Sport-Technical Skills
  • 6. Mental Fatigue Alters Sport-Related Decision-Making
  • 7. Conclusion and Perspectives for Future Studies
  • Author Contributions
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Brain stimulation and physical performance
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Effects of tDCS on Physical Performance
  • 2.1. Single-Joint Exercise
  • 2.1.1. Endurance
  • 2.1.2. Maximal strength and anaerobic work capacity
  • 2.2. Whole-Body Exercise
  • 2.2.1. Endurance
  • 2.2.2. Maximal power and anaerobic work capacity
  • 3. Summary
  • 4. Limitation of Current Literature and Future Directions
  • 5. Ethical Issues
  • 6. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Functional brain anatomy of exercise regulation
  • 1. ACC and Cost-Reward Evaluation
  • 2. Neural Circuitry of Incentive Motivation to Exert Motor Vigor
  • 3. Brain Structures Mediating Ergogenic Effects of Emotional Arousal and Other Manipulations
  • 4. Changing the Appraisal of Interoceptive Challenges
  • 5. Exploiting Placebo Effects to Upregulate Force or Power
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 19: The role of executive function in the self-regulation of endurance performance: A critical review
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Executive Function and Self-regulation
  • 3. Self-regulation and Endurance Performance
  • 4. Executive Function and Endurance Performance
  • 5. Executive Function, Exercise and the Brain
  • 6. Conclusion and Future Directions
  • References
  • Back Cover

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