Fundraising Principles and Practice

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 6. Februar 2017
  • |
  • 744 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-19650-1 (ISBN)
 
The complete guide to fundraising planning, tools, methods, and more
Fundraising Principles and Practice provides a unique resource for students and professionals seeking to deepen their understanding of fundraising in the current nonprofit environment. Based on emerging research drawn from economics, psychology, social psychology, and sociology, this book provides comprehensive analysis of the nonprofit sector. The discussion delves into donor behavior, decision making, social influences, and models, then uses that context to describe today's fundraising methods, tools, and practices. A robust planning framework helps you set objectives, formulate strategies, create a budget, schedule, and monitor activities, with in-depth guidance toward assessing and fine-tuning your approach. Coverage includes online fundraising, major gifts, planned giving, direct response, grants, corporate fundraising, and donor retention, with an integrated pedagogical approach that facilitates active learning. Case studies and examples illustrate the theory and principles presented, and the companion website offers additional opportunity to deepen your learning and assess your knowledge.
Fundraising has become a career specialty, and those who are successful at it are among the most in-demand in the nonprofit world. Great fundraisers make an organization's mission possible, and this book covers the essential information you need to help your organization succeed.
* Adopt an organized approach to fundraising planning
* Learn the common behaviors and motivations of donors
* Master the tools and practices of nonprofit fundraising
* Manage volunteers, monitor progress, evaluate events, and more
Fundraising is the the nonprofit's powerhouse. It's the critical component that supports and maintains all activities, and forms the foundation of the organization itself. Steady management, clear organization, effective methods, and the most up-to-date tools are vital to the role, and familiarity with donor psychology is essential for using these tools to their utmost capability. Fundraising Principles and Practice provides a comprehensive guide to all aspects of the field, with in-depth coverage of today's most effective approaches.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
ADRIAN SARGEANT is the director of the Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy at Plymouth University in the UK. He is the author and coauthor of several books, including Fundraising Management, Building Donor Loyalty, and Marketing Management for Nonprofit Organizations.
JEN SHANG is director of Research at the Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy at Plymouth University and professor of Philanthropic Psychology. The world's only philanthropic psychologist, her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Chronicle of Philanthropy and on National Public Radio.
1 - Fundraising Principles and Practice [Seite 3]
2 - Contents [Seite 5]
3 - Figures and Tables [Seite 15]
4 - Preface [Seite 23]
5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 27]
6 - The Authors [Seite 29]
7 - 1 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector [Seite 33]
7.1 - Objectives [Seite 33]
7.2 - Introduction [Seite 34]
7.3 - A "Third" Sector [Seite 34]
7.4 - A Tax-Based Definition [Seite 38]
7.5 - A Structural-Operational Definition [Seite 46]
7.6 - Size and Economic Significance of the Nonprofit Sector [Seite 49]
7.7 - Sources of Income [Seite 52]
7.8 - Philanthropic Income [Seite 53]
7.9 - Summary [Seite 56]
7.10 - Discussion Questions [Seite 57]
7.11 - References [Seite 57]
8 - 2 The Development of a Profession [Seite 59]
8.1 - Objectives [Seite 59]
8.2 - Introduction [Seite 60]
8.3 - Early American Fundraising [Seite 60]
8.4 - The Great Philanthropists [Seite 63]
8.5 - Key Historical Figures [Seite 64]
8.6 - Toward a Profession [Seite 66]
8.6.1 - Specialization in Categories of Activity [Seite 69]
8.6.2 - Specialization in Fundraising Occupations [Seite 72]
8.6.3 - Specialization in Professional Associations [Seite 72]
8.7 - Looking to the Future [Seite 74]
8.7.1 - Knowledge Generation [Seite 74]
8.7.2 - Knowledge Dissemination [Seite 75]
8.7.3 - Knowledge-Based Education [Seite 76]
8.8 - Summary [Seite 77]
8.9 - Discussion Questions [Seite 77]
8.10 - References [Seite 78]
9 - 3 Fundraising Ethics [Seite 80]
9.1 - Objectives [Seite 80]
9.2 - Introduction [Seite 80]
9.3 - What Is Ethics? [Seite 81]
9.3.1 - Meta-ethics [Seite 83]
9.3.2 - Normative Ethics [Seite 83]
9.3.3 - Applied Ethics [Seite 85]
9.4 - Pressure in Fundraising: An Ethical Case [Seite 93]
9.5 - Normative Fundraising Ethics [Seite 95]
9.5.1 - Trustism [Seite 96]
9.5.2 - Donorcentrism [Seite 97]
9.5.3 - Service of Philanthropy [Seite 99]
9.5.4 - Rights-Balancing Fundraising Ethics [Seite 100]
9.6 - Summary [Seite 105]
9.7 - Discussion Questions [Seite 106]
9.8 - References [Seite 107]
10 - 4 Individual Giving Behavior [Seite 110]
10.1 - Objectives [Seite 110]
10.2 - Introduction [Seite 111]
10.3 - Who Gives? [Seite 111]
10.4 - Motivation [Seite 116]
10.5 - Self-Interest Versus Altruism [Seite 117]
10.5.1 - Emotions as Motives [Seite 119]
10.5.2 - The Role of Empathy [Seite 120]
10.5.3 - The Role of Values [Seite 122]
10.6 - Definition of Donor Behavior [Seite 123]
10.7 - Modeling Donor Behavior [Seite 124]
10.8 - Attention [Seite 126]
10.9 - Perception [Seite 127]
10.10 - Emotion [Seite 129]
10.11 - Knowledge [Seite 132]
10.11.1 - Knowledge Content [Seite 133]
10.11.2 - Knowledge Structure [Seite 135]
10.12 - Attitudes [Seite 136]
10.12.1 - Expectancy-Value Model [Seite 136]
10.12.2 - Appraisal-Based Model [Seite 137]
10.12.3 - Means-End Chain Theory [Seite 137]
10.12.4 - Changing Attitudes [Seite 138]
10.13 - Donor Decision Making [Seite 141]
10.13.1 - Evaluation of Utility [Seite 141]
10.13.2 - Mental Accounting [Seite 142]
10.14 - Feedback [Seite 143]
10.15 - Alternative Models [Seite 145]
10.16 - Summary [Seite 147]
10.17 - Discussion Questions [Seite 147]
10.18 - References [Seite 148]
11 - 5 Social Influences on Giving [Seite 153]
11.1 - Objectives [Seite 153]
11.2 - Introduction [Seite 153]
11.3 - A Social Giving Model [Seite 154]
11.4 - Societal Environment [Seite 155]
11.5 - Social Environment [Seite 156]
11.5.1 - Social Influence [Seite 157]
11.5.2 - Social Networks [Seite 162]
11.5.3 - Social Identity [Seite 164]
11.6 - Summary [Seite 167]
11.7 - Discussion Questions [Seite 168]
11.8 - References [Seite 169]
12 - 6 Fundraising Planning: The Fundraising Audit [Seite 171]
12.1 - Objectives [Seite 171]
12.2 - Introduction [Seite 171]
12.3 - A Planning Framework [Seite 172]
12.3.1 - American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) [Seite 173]
12.3.2 - Planned Parenthood of Utah [Seite 174]
12.3.3 - American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) [Seite 174]
12.4 - The Fundraising Audit [Seite 176]
12.4.1 - Macro Factors [Seite 176]
12.4.2 - Market Factors [Seite 185]
12.5 - Analytical Tools [Seite 188]
12.5.1 - Product/Service Life Cycle [Seite 188]
12.5.2 - Portfolio Analysis [Seite 191]
12.5.3 - Drawbacks of Portfolio Models [Seite 196]
12.6 - Fundraising Metrics [Seite 197]
12.7 - Conducting an Audit in a Small Nonprofit [Seite 199]
12.8 - The SWOT Analysis [Seite 200]
12.9 - Summary [Seite 201]
12.10 - Discussion Questions [Seite 202]
12.11 - References [Seite 203]
13 - 7 Fundraising Planning [Seite 204]
13.1 - Objectives [Seite 204]
13.2 - Introduction [Seite 204]
13.3 - Setting Fundraising Objectives [Seite 205]
13.3.1 - Annual Givers/Sustainers or Monthly Givers [Seite 208]
13.4 - Key Strategies [Seite 209]
13.4.1 - Overall Direction [Seite 210]
13.4.2 - Market Segmentation: Segmenting Individual Donor Markets [Seite 212]
13.4.3 - Targeting [Seite 227]
13.4.4 - Positioning Strategy [Seite 229]
13.4.5 - Branding [Seite 232]
13.5 - Case for Support [Seite 241]
13.6 - Tactical Plans [Seite 241]
13.6.1 - Budget [Seite 242]
13.6.2 - Scheduling [Seite 243]
13.6.3 - Monitoring and Control [Seite 244]
13.7 - Selection of an Appropriate Planning Framework [Seite 244]
13.8 - Summary [Seite 245]
13.9 - Discussion Questions [Seite 246]
13.10 - References [Seite 247]
14 - 8 Case for Support [Seite 250]
14.1 - Objectives [Seite 250]
14.2 - Introduction [Seite 250]
14.2.1 - Internal Case [Seite 252]
14.2.2 - The External Case [Seite 256]
14.2.3 - Case Expression or Fundraising Proposition [Seite 262]
14.3 - Summary [Seite 265]
14.4 - Discussion Questions [Seite 266]
14.5 - References [Seite 266]
15 - 9 Assessing Fundraising Performance [Seite 268]
15.1 - Objectives [Seite 268]
15.2 - Introduction [Seite 268]
15.3 - Aggregate Fundraising Ratios [Seite 269]
15.3.1 - The FACE Ratio [Seite 270]
15.3.2 - Cost Per Dollar Raised [Seite 272]
15.4 - Conducting a Fundraising ROI Analysis [Seite 276]
15.5 - Other Measures of Performance [Seite 282]
15.6 - Benchmarking Fundraising Cost [Seite 284]
15.7 - Sector Benchmarking Initiatives [Seite 287]
15.7.1 - The Fundraising Effectiveness Project [Seite 287]
15.7.2 - Fundraising Fitness Test [Seite 289]
15.7.3 - Target Analytics [Seite 289]
15.8 - Making Investment Decisions [Seite 291]
15.8.1 - Calculating ROI [Seite 293]
15.8.2 - Payback Period [Seite 295]
15.8.3 - Discounted Cash Flow: Net Present Value [Seite 296]
15.8.4 - Discounted Cash Flows and Relevant Costs [Seite 298]
15.8.5 - Profitability Index [Seite 299]
15.8.6 - Real Rate and the Money (Nominal) Rate of Return [Seite 301]
15.9 - Accounting for Risk [Seite 303]
15.10 - Making the Case for Investment [Seite 304]
15.11 - Summary [Seite 304]
15.12 - Discussion Questions [Seite 305]
15.13 - References [Seite 306]
16 - 10 Direct Response Fundraising [Seite 308]
16.1 - Objectives [Seite 308]
16.2 - Introduction [Seite 308]
16.3 - Cornerstones of Direct Response [Seite 310]
16.4 - Acquisition Planning [Seite 312]
16.5 - Setting Recruitment Objectives [Seite 313]
16.6 - Segmentation [Seite 314]
16.7 - Profiling [Seite 316]
16.8 - Targeting [Seite 317]
16.9 - Media Selection and Planning [Seite 318]
16.9.1 - Direct Mail [Seite 318]
16.9.2 - List Swaps (Reciprocals) [Seite 327]
16.9.3 - Unaddressed Mail [Seite 328]
16.9.4 - Press and Magazine Advertising [Seite 328]
16.9.5 - Free-Standing Inserts [Seite 329]
16.9.6 - Direct Dialogue [Seite 330]
16.9.7 - Telephone Fundraising [Seite 333]
16.9.8 - Direct Response Television [Seite 334]
16.9.9 - Radio [Seite 336]
16.9.10 - Billboards [Seite 336]
16.10 - Two-Step Campaigns [Seite 338]
16.11 - The Nature of the Fundraising Message [Seite 339]
16.11.1 - The Case for Support [Seite 339]
16.11.2 - Writing Fundraising Copy [Seite 340]
16.11.3 - Illustration, Typeface, and Design [Seite 344]
16.12 - Fulfillment [Seite 345]
16.13 - Budgeting Control and Evaluation [Seite 346]
16.13.1 - Testing [Seite 346]
16.13.2 - Monitoring and Control [Seite 347]
16.14 - Summary [Seite 348]
16.15 - Discussion Questions [Seite 348]
16.16 - References [Seite 349]
17 - 11 Digital Fundraising [Seite 350]
17.1 - Objectives [Seite 350]
17.2 - Introduction [Seite 350]
17.3 - The Digital Giving Index [Seite 351]
17.3.1 - M+R Benchmark Study [Seite 352]
17.3.2 - Blackbaud Charitable Giving Report [Seite 352]
17.4 - A Digital Communications Mix [Seite 353]
17.5 - Search Engine Optimization [Seite 354]
17.5.1 - Natural or Organic Search [Seite 354]
17.5.2 - Pay Per Click [Seite 358]
17.5.3 - Creating a Good Landing Page [Seite 362]
17.5.4 - Cost Per Action Bidding [Seite 363]
17.5.5 - Google Ad Grants [Seite 363]
17.5.6 - Display Advertising [Seite 364]
17.5.7 - Designing an Effective Ad [Seite 365]
17.5.8 - Google Analytics [Seite 366]
17.5.9 - Opt-In Email [Seite 368]
17.5.10 - Email Metrics [Seite 371]
17.5.11 - Open Rates [Seite 371]
17.5.12 - Click-Through Rates [Seite 372]
17.5.13 - Response or Conversion Rate [Seite 373]
17.5.14 - Unsubscribe Rate [Seite 374]
17.6 - Viral Marketing [Seite 375]
17.6.1 - Making Viral Work [Seite 378]
17.7 - Website Design [Seite 382]
17.8 - Mobile Technology [Seite 385]
17.8.1 - Mobile Apps [Seite 386]
17.8.2 - Text to Give [Seite 387]
17.8.3 - Two-Stage [Seite 388]
17.9 - Donation Processing [Seite 389]
17.10 - Summary [Seite 390]
17.11 - Discussion Questions [Seite 390]
17.12 - References [Seite 391]
18 - 12 Social Media [Seite 392]
18.1 - Objectives [Seite 392]
18.2 - Introduction [Seite 392]
18.3 - The Major Players [Seite 394]
18.3.1 - Facebook [Seite 394]
18.3.2 - Twitter [Seite 397]
18.3.3 - LinkedIn [Seite 398]
18.3.4 - YouTube [Seite 399]
18.3.5 - Instagram [Seite 399]
18.3.6 - Pinterest [Seite 400]
18.3.7 - Google+ [Seite 400]
18.4 - Other Social Networks [Seite 400]
18.4.1 - Snapchat [Seite 401]
18.4.2 - Tumblr [Seite 401]
18.4.3 - Vine [Seite 401]
18.4.4 - Periscope [Seite 401]
18.4.5 - Flickr [Seite 401]
18.5 - Developing a Strategy [Seite 401]
18.5.1 - People [Seite 402]
18.5.2 - Objectives [Seite 403]
18.5.3 - Strategy [Seite 403]
18.5.4 - Technology [Seite 404]
18.6 - Formulating a Content Strategy [Seite 405]
18.7 - Integrating Your Approach [Seite 407]
18.7.1 - Website [Seite 408]
18.7.2 - Events [Seite 409]
18.7.3 - Email [Seite 411]
18.7.4 - Direct Mail [Seite 411]
18.8 - Leveraging Fans, Followers, and Influencers [Seite 413]
18.9 - Algorithms and Getting Your Content Seen [Seite 416]
18.10 - Measuring the Effectiveness of Your Social Media Efforts [Seite 419]
18.11 - Safeguarding Contacts [Seite 420]
18.12 - Summary [Seite 421]
18.13 - Discussion Questions [Seite 421]
18.14 - References [Seite 422]
19 - 13 Donor Retention and Development [Seite 424]
19.1 - Objectives [Seite 424]
19.2 - Introduction [Seite 424]
19.3 - What Is Loyalty? [Seite 427]
19.4 - Recruiting the Right People [Seite 429]
19.5 - Building Donor Loyalty [Seite 432]
19.5.1 - Donor Satisfaction [Seite 433]
19.5.2 - Donor Commitment [Seite 437]
19.6 - Planning for Retention [Seite 442]
19.7 - Relationship Fundraising [Seite 446]
19.8 - Relationship Fundraising 2.0 [Seite 449]
19.9 - Calculating Donor Value [Seite 450]
19.9.1 - Donor Lifetime Value [Seite 453]
19.9.2 - Calculating the LTV of Individual Donors [Seite 454]
19.9.3 - The Benefits of LTV Analysis [Seite 455]
19.9.4 - 1. Assigning Acquisition Allowances [Seite 456]
19.9.5 - 2. Refining the Targeting for Donor Acquisition Campaigns [Seite 456]
19.9.6 - 3. Setting Selection Criteria for Donor Marketing [Seite 457]
19.9.7 - 4. Investing in the Reactivation of Lapsed Donors [Seite 458]
19.9.8 - Recency/Frequency/Value Analysis [Seite 458]
19.10 - Segmenting for Growth [Seite 459]
19.10.1 - Major Donors [Seite 459]
19.10.2 - High-Value Donors [Seite 460]
19.10.3 - Sustained or Regular Givers [Seite 460]
19.10.4 - Low-Value Donors [Seite 461]
19.10.5 - Lapsed Donors [Seite 462]
19.11 - Loyalty Metrics [Seite 462]
19.12 - Summary [Seite 463]
19.13 - Discussion Questions [Seite 464]
19.14 - References [Seite 464]
20 - 14 Major Gift Fundraising [Seite 467]
20.1 - Objectives [Seite 467]
20.2 - Introduction [Seite 467]
20.3 - Characteristics of Major Givers [Seite 469]
20.4 - Motives of Major Givers [Seite 470]
20.5 - Major Donor Recruitment [Seite 476]
20.5.1 - Identification [Seite 477]
20.6 - Qualification [Seite 479]
20.6.1 - Develop Initial Strategy [Seite 482]
20.6.2 - Cultivation [Seite 484]
20.6.3 - Evaluate and Determine Final Strategy [Seite 486]
20.6.4 - Assign [Seite 487]
20.6.5 - Solicitation [Seite 487]
20.6.6 - Follow Through and Acknowledge [Seite 489]
20.6.7 - Stewardship [Seite 490]
20.6.8 - Renewal [Seite 491]
20.7 - Summary [Seite 492]
20.8 - Discussion Questions [Seite 492]
20.9 - References [Seite 493]
21 - 15 Bequest, In Memoriam, and Tribute Giving [Seite 495]
21.1 - Objectives [Seite 495]
21.2 - Estate Planning [Seite 499]
21.3 - Who Leaves Bequests? [Seite 502]
21.4 - Why Do People Give? [Seite 505]
21.4.1 - General Motives [Seite 506]
21.4.2 - Tax Avoidance [Seite 506]
21.4.3 - Social Norms [Seite 506]
21.4.4 - Reciprocation [Seite 508]
21.4.5 - Performance [Seite 509]
21.5 - Legacy-Specific Motives [Seite 509]
21.5.1 - Lack of Family Need [Seite 509]
21.5.2 - Autobiographical Reflections [Seite 510]
21.5.3 - Need to Live On [Seite 511]
21.5.4 - Spite [Seite 513]
21.6 - Soliciting Bequests [Seite 513]
21.7 - Talking the Language of Bequest [Seite 518]
21.8 - Stewarding Bequest Donors [Seite 523]
21.9 - Systems and Processes [Seite 525]
21.10 - In-Memory Giving [Seite 525]
21.11 - Summary [Seite 528]
21.12 - Discussion Questions [Seite 528]
21.13 - References [Seite 529]
22 - 16 Planned Giving [Seite 533]
22.1 - Objectives [Seite 533]
22.2 - Introduction [Seite 533]
22.3 - Planned Giving Vehicles [Seite 536]
22.3.1 - Bequest [Seite 536]
22.3.2 - Revocable Trusts [Seite 536]
22.3.3 - Charitable Gift Annuities [Seite 538]
22.3.4 - Deferred Payment Gift Annuities [Seite 539]
22.3.5 - Pooled Income Fund [Seite 540]
22.3.6 - Charitable Remainder Trust [Seite 541]
22.3.7 - Retained Life Interest/Life Estate Gifts [Seite 544]
22.3.8 - Life Insurance Gifts [Seite 545]
22.3.9 - Bargain Sale [Seite 546]
22.4 - Donor Motivation [Seite 547]
22.5 - Soliciting Planned Gifts [Seite 548]
22.5.1 - Making a Face-to-Face Solicitation [Seite 549]
22.6 - Planned Gift Donor Stewardship [Seite 551]
22.7 - Planned Gift Donor Appreciation [Seite 553]
22.8 - Managing the Planned Giving Function [Seite 554]
22.9 - Summary [Seite 556]
22.10 - Discussion Questions [Seite 557]
22.11 - References [Seite 557]
23 - 17 Corporate Giving and Fundraising [Seite 558]
23.1 - Objectives [Seite 558]
23.2 - Introduction [Seite 558]
23.3 - History [Seite 560]
23.4 - Why Do Corporations Give? [Seite 561]
23.5 - Forms of Business Support [Seite 566]
23.5.1 - Cash Donations [Seite 566]
23.5.2 - Donations of Stocks or Shares [Seite 567]
23.5.3 - Publicity [Seite 567]
23.5.4 - Gifts of Products/Services (also known as Gifts-in-Kind) [Seite 567]
23.5.5 - Staff Time [Seite 568]
23.5.6 - Sponsorship [Seite 569]
23.5.7 - Employee Fundraising [Seite 569]
23.5.8 - Cause-Related Marketing [Seite 572]
23.6 - Whom to Ask? [Seite 576]
23.6.1 - Selecting the Right Organization [Seite 576]
23.6.2 - The Concept of Fit [Seite 578]
23.7 - The Benefits and Pitfalls [Seite 580]
23.8 - Fundraising Planning [Seite 581]
23.8.1 - Objectives [Seite 582]
23.8.2 - Prospect Research [Seite 582]
23.8.3 - Case for Support [Seite 583]
23.8.4 - The Ethical Check [Seite 583]
23.8.5 - The Approach [Seite 587]
23.8.6 - Relationship Management [Seite 587]
23.8.7 - Assessment of Outcomes [Seite 588]
23.8.8 - Feedback [Seite 588]
23.9 - Summary [Seite 589]
23.10 - Discussion Questions [Seite 589]
23.11 - References [Seite 590]
24 - 18 Grant Fundraising [Seite 594]
24.1 - Objectives [Seite 594]
24.2 - Introduction [Seite 594]
24.3 - Definitions and Categories [Seite 595]
24.3.1 - Private Foundations [Seite 595]
24.3.2 - Public Foundations [Seite 596]
24.4 - Foundation Funding Trends [Seite 597]
24.5 - Preparation and Planning [Seite 599]
24.6 - Foundation Research [Seite 601]
24.6.1 - The Foundation Center [Seite 601]
24.6.2 - Other Information Sources [Seite 603]
24.7 - Prioritizing Effort [Seite 604]
24.8 - Initial Contact [Seite 605]
24.9 - The Application/Proposal [Seite 605]
24.9.1 - Components of a Proposal [Seite 607]
24.10 - Building Relationships [Seite 611]
24.11 - The Grant Cycle [Seite 612]
24.11.1 - Why Applications Fail [Seite 613]
24.12 - International Funding [Seite 616]
24.13 - Summary [Seite 617]
24.14 - Discussion Questions [Seite 618]
24.15 - References [Seite 619]
25 - 19 Fundraising Events [Seite 621]
25.1 - Objectives [Seite 621]
25.2 - Introduction [Seite 621]
25.2.1 - Receptions [Seite 622]
25.2.2 - Meals [Seite 622]
25.2.3 - Participation Events [Seite 622]
25.2.4 - Community Mega-Events [Seite 622]
25.2.5 - Nonevents [Seite 623]
25.3 - A Typology of Events [Seite 623]
25.3.1 - Fundraising Events [Seite 625]
25.3.2 - Identification Events [Seite 627]
25.3.3 - Education and Cultivation Events [Seite 630]
25.3.4 - Recognition Events [Seite 632]
25.4 - Anatomy of an Event [Seite 634]
25.5 - Evaluating Fundraising Events [Seite 639]
25.6 - Summary [Seite 642]
25.7 - Discussion Questions [Seite 643]
25.8 - References [Seite 643]
26 - 20 Managing Fundraising Volunteers [Seite 644]
26.1 - Objectives [Seite 644]
26.2 - Introduction [Seite 644]
26.3 - Formal versus Informal Volunteering [Seite 647]
26.4 - Volunteer Recruitment [Seite 652]
26.4.1 - Developing a Job Description [Seite 653]
26.4.2 - Identifying Prospects [Seite 656]
26.4.3 - Recruitment Communications [Seite 659]
26.4.4 - Screening and Orientation [Seite 662]
26.4.5 - Induction [Seite 662]
26.5 - Retention Strategies [Seite 664]
26.5.1 - Placement, Training, and Orientation [Seite 665]
26.5.2 - Quality Supervision [Seite 666]
26.5.3 - Managing Staff-Volunteer Interaction [Seite 668]
26.6 - Program Evaluation [Seite 671]
26.7 - Summary [Seite 672]
26.8 - Discussion Questions [Seite 673]
26.9 - References [Seite 673]
27 - 21 Leading Fundraising Teams [Seite 676]
27.1 - Objectives [Seite 676]
27.2 - Introduction [Seite 676]
27.3 - Trait Theory [Seite 677]
27.4 - Behavioral Theories [Seite 680]
27.5 - Contingency Theory [Seite 682]
27.5.1 - Fiedler [Seite 682]
27.5.2 - Hersey and Blanchard [Seite 684]
27.5.3 - House's Path-Goal Theory [Seite 686]
27.6 - Contemporary Leadership Theories [Seite 689]
27.6.1 - Charismatic Leadership [Seite 689]
27.6.2 - Transformational Leadership [Seite 690]
27.6.3 - Personal Humility [Seite 692]
27.6.4 - Professional Will [Seite 693]
27.6.5 - Leader-Member Exchange Theory [Seite 695]
27.7 - Summary [Seite 698]
27.8 - Discussion Questions [Seite 699]
27.9 - References [Seite 699]
28 - 22 Managing Public Trust and Confidence [Seite 702]
28.1 - Objectives [Seite 702]
28.2 - Introduction [Seite 702]
28.3 - Public Trust and Confidence [Seite 705]
28.4 - Building Trust in the Sector [Seite 707]
28.5 - Growing Confidence in the Nonprofit Sector [Seite 711]
28.5.1 - The Regulation of Fundraising [Seite 712]
28.5.2 - The Role of Watchdog Groups [Seite 714]
28.6 - Building Trust in Organizations [Seite 716]
28.7 - Building Confidence in the Organization [Seite 717]
28.7.1 - Principles of Good Complaint Handling [Seite 718]
28.8 - Summary [Seite 720]
28.9 - Discussion Questions [Seite 720]
28.10 - References [Seite 721]
29 - Name Index [Seite 723]
30 - Subject Index [Seite 726]
31 - EULA [Seite 745]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

61,99 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen