Systems Approach to Managing the Complexities of Process Industries

Systems Approach to Managing the Complexities of Process Industries
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 28. November 2017
  • |
  • 442 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804218-2 (ISBN)
 

A Systems Approach to Managing the Complexities of Process Industries discusses the principles of system engineering, system thinking, complexity thinking and how these apply to the process industry, including benefits and implementation in process safety management systems. The book focuses on the ways system engineering skills, PLM, and IIoT can radically improve effectiveness of implementation of the process safety management system.

Covering lifecycle, megaproject system engineering, and project management issues, this book reviews available tools and software and presents the practical web-based approach of Analysis & Dynamic Evaluation of Project Processes (ADEPP) for system engineering of the process manufacturing development and operation phases. Key solutions proposed include adding complexity management steps in the risk assessment framework of ISO 31000 and utilization of Installation Lifecycle Management. This study of this end-to-end process will help users improve operational excellence and navigate the complexities of managing a chemical or processing plant.

  • Presents a review of Operational Excellence and Process Safety Management Methods, along with solutions to complexity assessment and management
  • Provides a comparison of the process manufacturing industry with discrete manufacturing, identifying similarities and areas of customization for process manufacturing
  • Discusses key solutions for managing the complexities of process manufacturing development and operational phases


Fabienne-Fariba Salimi has over 30 years of experience as a chemical process engineer. She has experience in Management and Chemical Process Safety engineering in oil and gas industries both offshore and onshore installations. She has particular expertise is dynamic simulation of chemical processes and accident consequence modelling in quantitative risk analysis. Her main qualifications were obtained in Iran and France and she is member of the Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, International Society of Automation, and Association of the French System Engineers. She is the co-developer of ADEPP and has been the Project Manager of ADEPP Academy since 1994.
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 15,83 MB
978-0-12-804218-2 (9780128042182)
0128042184 (0128042184)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • A Systems Approach to Managing the Complexities of Process Industries
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 Perspective
  • 1.1 Understanding a Question is Half an Answer!
  • 1.2 Process Safety Management in Context of the Operational Excellence
  • 1.3 Regulatory Compliance Management System
  • 1.4 Cost of Noncompliance
  • 1.5 Process Safety Versus Occupational Safety
  • 1.6 Process Safety Indicators
  • 1.7 What Do We Manage, "Safety Processes" or "Process Safety"?
  • 1.7.1 Process Safety Engineering
  • 1.7.2 Management of the Safety Processes
  • 1.7.2.1 Lifecycle Processes
  • 1.7.2.2 Agreement Processes
  • 1.7.2.3 Enterprise Processes
  • 1.7.2.4 Project Processes
  • 1.7.2.5 Technical Processes
  • 1.7.3 Technical Process Model
  • 1.7.4 System Lifecycle Model
  • 1.7.5 Process Versus Procedure
  • 1.7.5.1 Procedures
  • 1.7.5.2 Processes
  • 1.7.6 Efficiency Versus Effectiveness
  • 1.8 Process Industry Versus Discrete Manufacturing
  • 1.9 Application of System Engineering in Process Industry
  • 1.10 Essential Skills to Cope With the Cyber-Physical Systems
  • 1.11 Why Does Complexity Matter?
  • 1.12 Barrier Thinking & Complexity
  • 1.13 Change Management & Complexity
  • 1.14 Complexity and Decision Making and Complexity
  • 1.15 Digital Transformation and Complexity
  • 1.15.1 Solutions for Complexity
  • 1.15.2 Consultant Role in Performance Improvement of the Complex Systems
  • Literature
  • Blog
  • Handbook
  • Standards
  • Guidance
  • Regulations
  • 2 Fundamentals of Systemic Approach
  • 2.1 Systemic Versus Systematic
  • 2.2 Criticality of the Systemic, Systematic Changes
  • 2.3 Systematic Versus Systemic Failure
  • 2.4 What is a System?
  • 2.4.1 Background
  • 2.4.2 System Definitions
  • 2.4.3 Different Types of System
  • 2.4.4 Environment Definition
  • 2.4.5 Complexity
  • 2.4.6 Emergence
  • 2.5 What is System Engineering?
  • 2.5.1 Background
  • 2.5.2 System Engineering Derivative Disciplines
  • 2.5.3 Cognitive Systems Engineering
  • 2.5.4 Configuration Management
  • 2.5.5 Control Engineering
  • 2.5.6 Software Engineering
  • 2.5.7 Industrial Engineering
  • 2.5.8 Interface Design
  • 2.5.9 Mechatronic Engineering
  • 2.5.10 Operations Research
  • 2.5.11 Performance Engineering
  • 2.5.12 Program Management and Project Management
  • 2.5.13 Proposal Engineering
  • 2.5.14 Reliability Engineering
  • 2.5.15 Risk Management
  • 2.5.16 Safety Engineering
  • 2.5.17 Security Engineering
  • 2.5.18 Scheduling
  • 2.5.19 System Engineering Scope of Work
  • 2.5.20 System-of-Interest
  • 2.5.21 Enabling Systems
  • 2.5.22 System Boundary
  • 2.5.23 System Structure
  • 2.5.24 System of Systems Characteristics and Types
  • 2.5.25 Requirement Engineering
  • 2.5.26 Modeling and Simulation
  • 2.5.27 System Engineering Management
  • 2.5.28 Risk and Opportunity Management
  • 2.5.29 Technical Performance Measures
  • 2.5.30 Define Other Nonfunctional Requirements
  • 2.5.31 Performance Assessment Measures
  • 2.5.32 Affordability/Cost-Effectiveness/Lifecycle Cost Analysis
  • 2.5.33 System Engineering Leading Indicators
  • 2.6 System Thinking
  • 2.6.1 Background
  • 2.6.2 System Thinking in Practice
  • 2.6.3 Case Study-Practical System Thinking for Alarm Management
  • 2.6.4 Hard and Soft Systems Thinking
  • 2.6.5 Critical Systems Thinking
  • 2.7 Emergence of Boundary Critique
  • 2.8 Systems Engineering Competencies Framework
  • 2.8.1 Systemized Systems Engineering Education Community
  • 2.8.2 Unified Framework
  • 2.8.3 System Engineering Abilities
  • 2.8.4 Competencies
  • 2.8.5 Supporting Techniques
  • 2.8.6 Basic Skills and Behaviors
  • 2.8.7 Domain Knowledge
  • 2.8.8 Competency Levels
  • 2.8.9 Overlaps Between the Project Management and System Engineering Competencies
  • References
  • Literature
  • Blog
  • Handbook
  • Standards
  • Guidance
  • 3 Fundamentals of the Complexity
  • 3.1 What Is Complexity?
  • 3.1.1 Sources and Factors of Complexity
  • 3.1.2 Disorganized Complexity Versus Organized complexity
  • 3.1.3 Complexity Topics
  • 3.1.4 Fields of Complexity in Enterprises
  • 3.2 Characteristics of Complexity
  • 3.3 Identifying the Right Level of Complexity
  • 3.4 Cynefin Complexity Framework
  • 3.5 How Complex Systems Fail?
  • 3.6 Resilience Engineering
  • 3.7 Improvisation Thinking
  • 3.8 Efficiency-Thoroughness Trade-off
  • 3.9 Specific Methods to Address Environmental and System Complexity
  • 3.10 Complexity Thinking: Guiding Principles
  • Literature
  • Blog
  • Video
  • Handbook
  • Standards
  • Guidance
  • 4 System Engineering of the Complex Megaprojects
  • 4.1 Megaproject Definition
  • 4.2 Megaprojects in Oil and Gas Industry
  • 4.3 Examples of Megaprojects Failures
  • 4.3.1 Kashagan-Kazakhstan
  • 4.3.2 Gorgon LNG Project, Australia
  • 4.3.3 Kearl Oil Sands, Canada
  • 4.4 Megaprojects Problems and Their Causes
  • 4.5 System Engineering for the Megaprojects
  • 4.5.1 What Is the Product of the Magaprojects?
  • 4.5.2 Modularization
  • 4.5.3 Measuring Successful Delivery of the Megaprojects
  • 4.5.4 Managing Change/Configuration Control
  • 4.5.5 System Engineering Process Verification and Validation
  • 4.5.6 Defining and Allocating the Hand-over Responsibilities
  • 4.6 Definition of Complexity for Megaprojects
  • 4.6.1 Definition of Megaproject Based on Size and Complexity
  • 4.6.2 Small and Noncomplex Projects (Small Projects, SP)
  • 4.6.3 Large and Noncomplex Projects (Large Projects, LP)
  • 4.6.4 Small and Complex Projects (CP)
  • 4.6.5 Large and Complex (Mega Projects, MP)
  • 4.6.6 Design Complexity
  • 4.6.7 Organizational Complexity
  • 4.6.8 Development of Overall Complexity With Time
  • 4.6.9 Task Complexity
  • 4.6.10 Social Complexity
  • 4.6.11 Cultural Complexity
  • 4.6.12 Modularity and Complexity
  • 4.6.12.1 Basic Definitions
  • 4.6.12.2 Hierarchies and Heterarchies
  • 4.6.12.3 Aspects and Mapping Relationships
  • 4.6.12.4 Aspects and Abstractions of Modularity
  • 4.6.13 Three Core Aspects of Modularity
  • 4.6.13.1 Structural Encapsulation
  • 4.6.13.2 Function-Structure Mapping
  • 4.6.13.3 Interfacing
  • 4.6.14 Two Abstractions From Modularity
  • 4.6.14.1 Function-Driven Encapsulation
  • 4.6.14.2 Interface Compatibility
  • 4.6.15 Aspects of Modernization Complexity
  • 4.6.15.1 Complexity as Non-One-to-One Function-Structure Mappings
  • 4.6.15.2 Multistructural Function Realization and Architectural Robustness
  • 4.6.15.3 Context-Dependent Multifunctionality and Architectural Flexibility
  • 4.6.15.4 Complexity as Ill-Defined Interfaces and Shifting System Boundaries
  • 4.6.15.5 Complexity as Overlapping Levels
  • 4.6.15.6 Multilevel Characterizations and Heterarchy
  • 4.6.16 Endogenous and Exogenous Functions
  • 4.6.17 Behavioral Robustness and Flexibility
  • 4.6.18 Means of Reduction of the Complexity
  • 4.7 Megaproject Management Challenges
  • Literature
  • Blog
  • Handbook
  • Guidance
  • 5 Modeling and Simulation: The Essential Tools to Manage the Complexities
  • 5.1 Background
  • 5.2 Evolution of Web Technology
  • 5.3 Evolution of IIoT
  • 5.4 Open Platform Communications (OPC)
  • 5.4.1 ISA-95 Information Model
  • 5.4.2 Process Safety IIoT Scope
  • 5.4.3 Process Safety Management IIoT Scope
  • 5.5 Big Data Management
  • 5.6 Cloud Computing
  • 5.6.1 Background
  • 5.7 Fog Computing
  • 5.7.1 Fog Computing in an Industrial Context
  • 5.8 Cyber Security Risk Management
  • 5.9 Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE)
  • 5.9.1 Introduction
  • 5.9.2 Systems Engineering Drivers and Inhibitors
  • 5.9.3 MBSE Overview
  • 5.9.4 OMG System Modeling Language
  • 5.9.5 MBSE in Practice
  • 5.10 Application Lifecycle Management
  • 5.11 Product Lifecycle Management
  • 5.12 Multiphysics
  • 5.13 "Frontloading" Simulation Results in Optimized Products
  • 5.14 Virtual Reality
  • 5.14.1 Virtual Design
  • 5.14.2 Virtual Training
  • 5.14.3 Virtual Construction
  • 5.14.4 Virtual Factory
  • 5.15 MBSE for Process Manufacturing
  • 5.15.1 Four Pillars of MBSE for Process Manufacturing Lifecycle
  • 5.15.2 Digital Asset in Process Manufacturing
  • 5.15.3 Digital Asset Maturity Level
  • 5.15.4 Digital Asset Maturity Level
  • 5.15.5 Installation Lifecycle Management
  • 5.15.6 Process Plant Digital Twin
  • 5.15.7 Open Industrial Interoperability Ecosystem
  • 5.16 Application of ILM to Create the Process Safety Management Framework
  • 5.16.1 Considering Complexity in Risk Assessment
  • 5.16.2 Simultaneous Technical, Organizational, and People Complexity Management
  • 5.16.3 Self-Organization to Manage the People Complexity
  • 5.17 Conclusion (Conclusion of the Book)
  • Literature
  • Blog
  • Handbook
  • Standards
  • Guidance
  • Software
  • Tutorials & Learning Materials (All Chapters)
  • Associations
  • Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) Glossary
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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