Light on Creation

Ancient Commentators in Dialogue and Debate on the Origin of the World
 
 
Mohr Siebeck (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 30. Oktober 2017
  • |
  • 314 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-16-155586-2 (ISBN)
 
The present volume contains the proceedings of an international colloquium held in February 2015 at the Arts Faculty of the KU Leuven that brought together specialists in (late) ancient philosophy and early Christian studies. Contributors were asked to reflect on the reception of two foundational texts dealing with the origin of the world - the third book of Plato's Timaeus and the Genesis account of the creation. The organizers had a double aim: They wished to offer a forum for furthering the dialogue between colleagues working in these respective fields and to do this by studying in a comparative perspective both a crucial topic shared by these traditions and the literary genres through which this topic was developed and transmitted. The two reference texts have been studied in antiquity in a selective way, through citations and essays dealing with specific issues, and in a more systematic way through commentaries.
The book is divided into three parts. The first one deals with the so-called Middle- and Neoplatonic tradition. The second part is dedicated to the Christian tradition and contains papers on several of the more important Christian authors who dealt with the Hexaemeron. The third part is entitled 'Some Other Voices' and deals with authors and movements that combine elements from various traditions. Special attention is given to the nature and dynamics of the often close relationship between the various traditions as envisaged by Jewish-Christian authors and to the remarkable lack of interest from the Neoplatonists for 'the other side'.
  • Englisch
  • Tübingen
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  • Deutschland
  • 4,57 MB
978-3-16-155586-2 (9783161555862)
3161555864 (3161555864)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
2 - Preface [Seite 6]
3 - Table of Contents [Seite 10]
4 - I. The Middle- and Neoplatonic Tradition [Seite 12]
4.1 - Mauro Bonazzi: Middle Platonists on the Eternity of the Universe [Seite 14]
4.1.1 - I. The Old Academics and Middle Platonistson the Eternity of the Universe [Seite 15]
4.1.2 - II. Middle Platonists and the Hellenistic Debate [Seite 19]
4.2 - Sarah Klitenic Wear: The Position and Function of the Demiurge in Syrianus's Cosmos [Seite 28]
4.2.1 - I. Introduction [Seite 28]
4.2.2 - II. Syrianus on the Cosmic Place of the Demiurge [Seite 29]
4.2.3 - III. The Demiurge and the Paradigm [Seite 34]
4.2.4 - IV. The Demiurge and the Hypostasis Soul, World Soul [Seite 36]
4.2.5 - V. The Demiurge and Psychic Life [Seite 38]
4.2.6 - VI. Conclusion [Seite 40]
4.3 - Lorenzo Ferroni: Proclus, in Timaeum, II, 340.14-341.24 Diehl. Some Textual Remarks [Seite 42]
4.3.1 - I. Ab Ernesto Diehl, of course, incipiendum [Seite 42]
4.3.2 - II. A Word on the Manuscript Tradition [Seite 44]
4.3.3 - III. An Appreciation of Diehl's Critical Edition [Seite 47]
4.3.4 - Appendix. An Italian Translationof the Discussed Proclus Passage [Seite 58]
4.4 - Gerd Van Riel: How Can the Perceptible World be Perceptible? Proclus on the Causes of Perceptibility [Seite 60]
5 - II. The Christian Tradition [Seite 72]
5.1 - David C. DeMarco: Basil of Caesarea's Exegesis of the Heavens in Homiliae in hexaemeron 3 [Seite 74]
5.1.1 - I. The Structure of Homily 3 [Seite 75]
5.1.2 - II. Synthesis [Seite 92]
5.1.3 - Appendix: Outline of Homily 3 [Seite 95]
5.2 - Volker Henning Drecoll: The Use of Scripture in Basil's Homilies in Hexaemeron [Seite 98]
5.2.1 - I. The Use of Biblical Quotations - Some Formal Observations [Seite 99]
5.2.2 - II. No Allegory, Please [Seite 103]
5.2.3 - III. The Deeper Sense [Seite 108]
5.3 - Samuel Pomeroy: Representing the Jews: John Chrysostom's Use of Exegetical and Theological Traditions for Gen 1:26a (In Gen. hom. 8) [Seite 116]
5.3.1 - I. Introduction [Seite 116]
5.3.2 - II. Patristic Authors and the 'Jewish' Exegesis of Gen 1:26a [Seite 119]
5.3.2.1 - 1. Prooimium and Exegesis in In Gen. hom. 8 [Seite 119]
5.3.2.2 - 2. Views Prior to Basil of Caesarea [Seite 122]
5.3.2.3 - 3. Basil's Hexaemeron [Seite 124]
5.3.2.4 - 4. John Chrysostom, Basil, and the Sources of Pro-Nicene Theology [Seite 127]
5.3.3 - III. Contextual Concerns: Syrian Biblical Exegesis [Seite 132]
5.3.3.1 - 1. Immediate Circle [Seite 132]
5.3.3.2 - 2. Other Texts [Seite 133]
5.3.3.3 - 3. Targumic Circle [Seite 134]
5.3.4 - IV. Conclusion [Seite 136]
5.4 - David L. Dusenbury: Judaic Authority in Nemesius of Emesa's De natura hominis (390 CE) [Seite 138]
5.4.1 - I. Hellenic, Judaic, and Christian Scripturesin De natura hominis § 42 [Seite 139]
5.4.2 - II. 'Words of Moses' in the De natura hominis [Seite 146]
5.4.2.1 - 1. Moses and the Wisdom of the Demiurge [Seite 147]
5.4.2.2 - 2. Moses and the Shock of Recognition [Seite 147]
5.4.2.3 - 3. Moses and the Harmony of Reason [Seite 149]
5.4.2.4 - 4. Moses and the Generation of Souls - by Way of Eunomius of Cyzicus [Seite 150]
5.4.3 - III. 'Doctrines of the Hebrews' in the De natura hominis [Seite 151]
5.4.3.1 - 1. The Hebrews and Bodily Immortality - by Way of Theophilus of Antioch [Seite 152]
5.4.3.2 - 2. 'A Doctrine of the Hebrews' - by Way of Psalm 104 [Seite 156]
5.4.3.3 - 3. The Hebrews and creatio ex abysso - by Way of Apollinaris of Laodicea [Seite 158]
5.4.3.4 - 4. The Hebrews and True Divination - by Way of Pythagoras Palaestinus [Seite 160]
5.4.4 - IV. Conclusions [Seite 166]
5.5 - Benjamin Gleede: Christian Apologetics or Confessional Polemics? Context and Motivation of Philoponus' De opificio mundi [Seite 168]
5.6 - Paul M. Blowers: From Nonbeing to Eternal Well-Being: Creation ex nihilo in the Cosmology and Soteriology of Maximus the Confessor [Seite 180]
5.6.1 - I. Maximus and the Polyvalence of Creation ex nihilo [Seite 181]
5.6.1.1 - 1. First Principles of Creation ex nihilo in Maximus [Seite 181]
5.6.1.2 - 2. The "Nothing" from which the Creator Creates [Seite 183]
5.6.2 - II. Maximus on the Logos and Mythos of Creation ex nihilo [Seite 187]
5.6.2.1 - 1. Making Something of Nothing: Logos and Logoi [Seite 187]
5.6.2.2 - 2. Maximus's Refreshed Mythos of the "Recapitulation" of Creationin Jesus Christ [Seite 190]
5.6.2.3 - 3. Creatio ex nihilo et continua: The Logos's Relentless and Enduring Actionin the World [Seite 192]
5.6.3 - III. Conclusion [Seite 195]
5.7 - Clement Kuehn: Christ Hero. An Epic Commentary on Creation [Seite 198]
5.7.1 - Introduction [Seite 198]
5.7.2 - I. Lady in Distress [Seite 202]
5.7.3 - II. Sailing [Seite 206]
5.7.4 - III. Strange Lands and Stranger Creatures [Seite 209]
5.7.5 - IV. Offspring and Divine Assistance [Seite 213]
5.7.6 - V. Enemies and Battles [Seite 218]
5.7.7 - VI. The Bride [Seite 227]
5.7.8 - Conclusion [Seite 232]
5.8 - Dimitrios Zaganas: The Debate on Gen 1:1-3 According to Anastasius Sinaita's Hexaemeron [Seite 236]
5.9 - I. Debating the Principle(s) [Seite 236]
5.9.1 - 1. Greeks and Christians on the Origin of the World (Gen 1:1a) [Seite 237]
5.9.2 - 2. Anastasius of Sinai and Michael Psellus: Two Different Accounts of a CommonSource [Seite 241]
5.9.3 - 3. The Making of a Fictitious Debate [Seite 243]
5.10 - II. Debating the Elements [Seite 244]
5.10.1 - 1. Heaven and Earth [Seite 244]
5.10.2 - 2. Light and Fire [Seite 245]
5.10.3 - 3. Darkness and Light [Seite 247]
5.11 - III. Conclusion: Anastasius Between Reportingand Creating Debates and Aporias [Seite 250]
6 - III. Some Other Voices [Seite 252]
6.1 - Gregory E. Sterling: "The Most Perfect Work": The Role of Matter in Philo of Alexandria [Seite 254]
6.1.1 - I. Two Principles [Seite 256]
6.1.2 - II. A Description of Matter [Seite 260]
6.1.3 - III. Five Presuppositions [Seite 265]
6.1.4 - IV. Conclusion [Seite 266]
6.2 - Claudio Moreschini: Calcidius between Creatio Ex Nihilo and Platonism [Seite 270]
6.2.1 - I. Creatio ex nihilo and Christian Thought [Seite 270]
6.2.2 - II. Calcidius [Seite 271]
6.2.3 - III. Calcidius' Sources [Seite 273]
6.2.4 - IV. Chronology of Calcidius and Hosius [Seite 275]
6.2.5 - V. An Outline of Calcidius' Platonism [Seite 278]
6.2.6 - VI. The Platonic Christian Calcidius [Seite 280]
6.2.7 - VII. Calcidius' Christianity [Seite 281]
6.2.8 - VIII. The Platonic and Christian Calcidius [Seite 286]
6.3 - Gerard P. Luttikhuizen: Gnostic Views on the Origin and the Nature of the Universe [Seite 288]
6.3.1 - I. The Meta-Cosmic Realm of the True God [Seite 289]
6.3.2 - II. The Origin of the Demiurge and his Demonic World [Seite 292]
6.3.3 - III. The Lower World [Seite 296]
6.3.4 - IV. The Relationship between Greek Philosophicaland Biblical-Jewish Influences [Seite 298]
7 - Index of Modern Authors [Seite 300]
8 - Index of Ancient Texts and Authors [Seite 306]
9 - Index of Biblical References [Seite 323]
9.1 - Old Testament [Seite 323]
9.2 - New Testament [Seite 324]

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