Occupation-Centred Practice with Children

A Practical Guide for Occupational Therapists
 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 16. März 2017
  • |
  • 408 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-05775-8 (ISBN)
 
Occupation-Centred Practice with Children remains the only occupational therapy book which supports the development and implementation of occupation-centred practice with children. Drawing on the latest occupational therapy theory and research, this new edition has been fully updated throughout, and includes new chapters on occupational transitions for children and young people, assessing children's occupations and participation, intervention within schools, the arts and children's occupational opportunities, as well as using animals to support children's occupational engagement.
Key features:
* Written by an international expert team of contributors.
* Each chapter begins with preliminary questions to assist with consideration of current knowledge, and then reflection questions at the conclusion to allow revision of key content in order to support independent learning.
* Highly practical, with a range of case studies, key point summaries, reflective questions, best practice guidelines, and a range of tools, interventions and techniques to aid applications to practice.
* A new appendix outlining all the assessments referred to in the book has now been included.
Occupation-Centred Practice with Children is a practical, theoretically grounded and evidence based guide to contemporary occupational therapy practice, and is important reading for all occupational therapy students and therapists wishing to make a real difference to children and their families' lives.
2. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Überarbeitete Ausgabe
  • 10,94 MB
978-1-119-05775-8 (9781119057758)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
About the Editors
Sylvia Rodger AM, Emeritus Professor, University of Queensland, Australia and Director of Research and Education Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC).
Ann Kennedy-Behr, Lecturer and Program Coordinator - Discipline of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Sports Science, University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia.
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 7]
4 - Notes on Contributors [Seite 13]
5 - Foreword [Seite 17]
6 - Preface [Seite 19]
7 - Acknowledgements [Seite 21]
8 - Chapter 1 Introduction to Occupation-centred Practice for Children [Seite 23]
8.1 - Introduction [Seite 23]
8.2 - Re-affirming occupation: The core of occupational therapy [Seite 27]
8.3 - External influences impacting occupational therapy practice [Seite 28]
8.4 - International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) [Seite 30]
8.5 - United Nations' declarations [Seite 31]
8.5.1 - World Fit for Children [Seite 31]
8.5.2 - Millennium Development Goals [Seite 32]
8.6 - The evolution of occupational therapy practice with children [Seite 33]
8.7 - Changing views of child development and maturation [Seite 33]
8.8 - Emerging views about occupational development [Seite 35]
8.9 - Re-focusing occupational therapy with children [Seite 36]
8.10 - Conclusion [Seite 37]
8.11 - References [Seite 38]
9 - Chapter 2 Becoming an Occupation-centred Practitioner [Seite 43]
9.1 - Introduction [Seite 43]
9.2 - Theoretical underpinnings of occupational therapy with children [Seite 44]
9.3 - Occupation-centred and performance-component focused approaches to practice with children [Seite 45]
9.4 - Characteristics of occupation-centred practice for children [Seite 50]
9.4.1 - Client-centred orientation (child- and family-centred) [Seite 50]
9.4.2 - Based on collaborative relationships [Seite 51]
9.4.3 - Client-chosen goals (child- and family-chosen goals) [Seite 51]
9.4.4 - Contextual relevance [Seite 52]
9.4.5 - Active engagement of children and parents [Seite 52]
9.4.6 - Individualisation of intervention [Seite 52]
9.5 - Focus on occupational performance and participation throughout the process [Seite 52]
9.5.1 - Information gathering focuses on roles, occupations, performance and environment [Seite 53]
9.5.2 - Intervention focuses on roles, occupations, performance and environment [Seite 56]
9.5.3 - Means versus ends [Seite 57]
9.5.4 - Interventions are whole or finite [Seite 59]
9.5.5 - Occupation-centred evaluation of intervention outcomes [Seite 60]
9.6 - Conclusion [Seite 61]
9.7 - References [Seite 62]
10 - Chapter 3 Child and Family-centred Service Provision [Seite 67]
10.1 - Introduction [Seite 67]
10.2 - Defining the client: Who and how many? [Seite 68]
10.3 - Client-centred practice [Seite 68]
10.4 - Unequal power in relationships [Seite 69]
10.5 - Recognising expertise and goal setting [Seite 69]
10.6 - Child-centred practice [Seite 70]
10.7 - Family-centred practice and service provision [Seite 71]
10.8 - Family-centred practice, family-centred services and family-centred care [Seite 73]
10.9 - Becoming a child- and/or family-centred practitioner [Seite 74]
10.9.1 - Relationship development [Seite 74]
10.9.2 - Goal identification and setting [Seite 74]
10.9.3 - Shared decision-making [Seite 76]
10.10 - Developing family-centred services [Seite 77]
10.10.1 - Considerations for delivering family-centred practice [Seite 77]
10.11 - Outcomes of family-centred practice and family-centred services and their measurement [Seite 83]
10.12 - The extended family and community [Seite 86]
10.13 - Conclusion [Seite 87]
10.14 - References [Seite 88]
11 - Chapter 4 Cultural Influences and Occupation-centred Practice with Children and Families [Seite 95]
11.1 - Introduction [Seite 95]
11.2 - Culture and the occupations of the child [Seite 96]
11.3 - Culturally responsive occupational therapy [Seite 97]
11.4 - The child's and family's stories are central [Seite 98]
11.5 - Getting connected [Seite 99]
11.6 - Being connected [Seite 100]
11.7 - Staying connected [Seite 102]
11.8 - Building connections [Seite 104]
11.9 - Case studies [Seite 104]
11.10 - Making the invisible visible [Seite 110]
11.11 - Conclusion [Seite 110]
11.12 - References [Seite 111]
12 - Chapter 5 Occupational Goal Setting with Children and Families [Seite 113]
12.1 - Introduction [Seite 113]
12.2 - Giving children and families a voice [Seite 114]
12.3 - Goal setting and motivation [Seite 115]
12.4 - Goal setting and outcomes [Seite 116]
12.5 - Tools to facilitate goal setting with children and families [Seite 116]
12.5.1 - Perceived Efficacy and Goal Setting System [Seite 116]
12.5.2 - Family Goal Setting Tool [Seite 119]
12.5.3 - Canadian Occupational Performance Measure [Seite 123]
12.5.4 - Child Occupational Self Assessment [Seite 123]
12.5.5 - Paediatric and Preschool Activity Card Sort [Seite 123]
12.6 - Summary [Seite 124]
12.7 - Goal setting contributes to outcome measurement [Seite 124]
12.8 - Case studies: Goal setting with children and parents [Seite 125]
12.9 - Conclusion [Seite 128]
12.10 - References [Seite 128]
13 - Chapter 6 Occupational Transitions for Children and Young People [Seite 133]
13.1 - Introduction [Seite 133]
13.2 - Definition of transition using a life course perspective [Seite 134]
13.3 - Transition from home to early childcare centres [Seite 134]
13.4 - Transition from early childhood care to primary school [Seite 138]
13.5 - School readiness [Seite 140]
13.6 - Transition to secondary school [Seite 143]
13.6.1 - Person changes [Seite 143]
13.6.2 - Environment [Seite 143]
13.6.3 - Occupation [Seite 144]
13.6.4 - Degree of 'fit' [Seite 144]
13.7 - Tips for transition to secondary school [Seite 147]
13.8 - Transition to post-school options [Seite 149]
13.9 - Conclusion [Seite 151]
13.10 - References [Seite 151]
14 - Chapter 7 Assessing Children's Occupations and Participation [Seite 155]
14.1 - Introduction [Seite 155]
14.2 - Bottom-up or top-down approaches to assessment? [Seite 157]
14.3 - Occupation- and Participation-Centred Assessment with Children (OP-CAC) framework [Seite 159]
14.4 - Implementation of Occupation- and Participation-Centred Assessment with Children (OP-CAC) framework: Assessment in action [Seite 160]
14.5 - Occupation- and Participation-Centred Assessment with Children (OP-CAC) framework: Tools [Seite 163]
14.6 - Conclusion [Seite 181]
14.7 - References [Seite 181]
15 - Chapter 8 Cognitive Orientation for Daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP): An Occupation-centred Intervention [Seite 187]
15.1 - Introduction [Seite 187]
15.2 - CO-OP: A brief overview [Seite 188]
15.3 - CO-OP Approach: An occupation-centred intervention [Seite 191]
15.3.1 - Child- and family-centred orientation [Seite 191]
15.3.2 - Collaborative partnerships [Seite 192]
15.3.3 - Child-chosen goals [Seite 192]
15.3.4 - Contextual relevance [Seite 194]
15.3.5 - Active engagement of children and parent(s) [Seite 194]
15.3.6 - Individualisation of intervention [Seite 196]
15.3.7 - Focus on occupational performance and participation [Seite 197]
15.3.8 - Information gathering about roles, occupations, performance and environments [Seite 198]
15.3.9 - Intervention is occupation-focused, 'whole' or 'finite' [Seite 199]
15.3.10 - Occupation-centred evaluation of intervention outcomes [Seite 199]
15.4 - Review of handwriting intervention [Seite 205]
15.5 - Conclusion [Seite 205]
15.6 - References [Seite 206]
16 - Chapter 9 Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform (PRPP): Occupation-centred Task Analysis and Intervention System [Seite 211]
16.1 - Introduction [Seite 211]
16.2 - Information processing, cognitive strategy use and occupational performance [Seite 212]
16.3 - The Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perceive (PRPP) System of Task Analysis and intervention [Seite 214]
16.3.1 - PRPP assessment [Seite 214]
16.3.2 - PRPP intervention [Seite 216]
16.4 - Using the PRPP system of task analysis and intervention: David [Seite 218]
16.5 - 'Perceive': Observing and prompting sensory processing strategies during task performance [Seite 220]
16.5.1 - Assessment of David: Perceive [Seite 220]
16.6 - 'Recall': Observing strategies used for storage and retrieval of information during task performance [Seite 221]
16.6.1 - Assessment: Recall [Seite 221]
16.7 - 'Plan': Processing information for organizing and problem?solving [Seite 223]
16.7.1 - Assessment: 'Plan' [Seite 223]
16.7.2 - 'Perform': Processing output and performance feedback [Seite 225]
16.7.3 - Assessment: 'Perform' [Seite 225]
16.7.4 - Intervention [Seite 226]
16.8 - Conclusion [Seite 227]
16.9 - References [Seite 228]
17 - Chapter 10 Occupational Performance Coaching (OPC): Enabling Caregivers' and Children's Occupational Performance [Seite 231]
17.1 - Introduction [Seite 231]
17.2 - Theoretical and philosophical basis [Seite 232]
17.3 - Three enabling domains [Seite 233]
17.3.1 - Structured process [Seite 233]
17.3.2 - Collaborative Performance Analysis [Seite 236]
17.3.3 - Emotional support [Seite 246]
17.3.4 - Information exchange [Seite 247]
17.4 - Research about OPC [Seite 250]
17.4.1 - OPC with caregivers other than parents [Seite 250]
17.5 - Conclusion [Seite 251]
17.6 - References [Seite 251]
18 - Chapter 11 Occupation-centred Intervention in the School Setting [Seite 255]
18.1 - Understanding the occupations of the school student [Seite 257]
18.2 - Educationally relevant occupational therapy in schools [Seite 258]
18.3 - Ways of working in schools [Seite 260]
18.4 - Planning educational programmes for diverse learners [Seite 260]
18.5 - Occupation-centred information gathering in educational settings [Seite 262]
18.6 - Occupation-centred programme planning and intervention in schools [Seite 266]
18.7 - Collaboration in service delivery [Seite 267]
18.8 - Conclusion [Seite 271]
18.9 - References [Seite 272]
19 - Chapter 12 Occupation-centred Practice: When the Classroom Is Your Client [Seite 279]
19.1 - Introduction [Seite 279]
19.2 - Practicalities of implementing occupation-centred classroom-based practice [Seite 281]
19.2.1 - The Classroom Intervention Reasoning Approach: Description and overview [Seite 283]
19.3 - Partnering for Change: A description of the model [Seite 291]
19.3.1 - Tier 1: Universal Design for Learning [Seite 292]
19.3.2 - Tier 2: Differentiated Instruction [Seite 293]
19.3.3 - Tier 3: Accommodation [Seite 293]
19.3.4 - Challenges and possibilities for occupation-centred whole-class or whole-school practice [Seite 296]
19.4 - Conclusion [Seite 297]
19.5 - Acknowledgements [Seite 297]
19.6 - References [Seite 300]
19.7 - Appendix 12.1 Occupational performance analysis template [Seite 302]
19.8 - Appendix 12.2 Occupational performance skills included in the OTIPM: Motor, process, and social interaction [Seite 306]
20 - Chapter 13 Enablement of Children's Leisure Participation [Seite 311]
20.1 - Introduction [Seite 311]
20.2 - Outcomes of leisure engagement [Seite 313]
20.3 - Engaging and Coaching for Health - Child: Model of leisure coaching [Seite 314]
20.3.1 - Engagement [Seite 314]
20.3.2 - Coaching [Seite 315]
20.3.3 - Community participation [Seite 315]
20.4 - Step One: Creating successful engagements [Seite 316]
20.5 - Step Two: Coaching to promote personal growth [Seite 320]
20.5.1 - A client-centred approach [Seite 320]
20.5.2 - Specialised interventions [Seite 322]
20.5.3 - A?=?Autonomy principles to promote personally meaningful choice [Seite 324]
20.5.4 - R?=?Relatedness interventions to promote social connectivity [Seite 324]
20.5.5 - C?=?Competence interventions to promote mastery [Seite 325]
20.5.6 - Community climate [Seite 326]
20.6 - Conclusion [Seite 330]
20.7 - References [Seite 330]
21 - Chapter 14 The Arts and Children's Occupational Opportunities [Seite 333]
21.1 - Introduction [Seite 333]
21.2 - The affordances of the arts [Seite 334]
21.3 - Overview of arts in children's health care [Seite 334]
21.4 - Role of creativity and the performing arts within childhood play: Identity, imitation and imagination [Seite 335]
21.5 - Skill acquisition and empowerment [Seite 338]
21.6 - Motivation and motivationally enhanced learning [Seite 339]
21.7 - Self-reflection, feedback and competition [Seite 340]
21.8 - Emerging evidence for creative performing arts in therapies for children [Seite 342]
21.8.1 - Circus experiences [Seite 342]
21.8.2 - Magic experiences [Seite 343]
21.8.3 - Music experiences [Seite 345]
21.9 - Conclusion [Seite 345]
21.10 - References [Seite 346]
22 - Chapter 15 Using Animals to Support Children's Occupational Engagement [Seite 351]
22.1 - Introduction [Seite 351]
22.2 - AAT as an enabler of occupational engagement [Seite 353]
22.3 - Theory in AAT [Seite 354]
22.4 - Attachment patterns, secure child-therapist relationships, and the effects of human-animal interaction [Seite 354]
22.5 - Physiological stress response [Seite 355]
22.6 - Understanding the individual meaning of engagement in human-animal interaction [Seite 356]
22.7 - Methods of AAT [Seite 357]
22.8 - AAT to support an increase in desired social behaviours/attention in social interaction [Seite 358]
22.9 - Using AAT to facilitate social interaction and positive social attention [Seite 359]
22.10 - Assisting participation in meaningful activities [Seite 361]
22.11 - Decision-making in AAT [Seite 363]
22.11.1 - Step 1: Identification of occupational performance issues [Seite 364]
22.11.2 - Step 2: Consideration of AAT, if barriers to goal achievement are found in the areas of: [Seite 364]
22.11.3 - Step 3: Screening of participants [Seite 364]
22.11.4 - Step 4: Conditions/requirements [Seite 366]
22.12 - Conclusion [Seite 366]
22.13 - References [Seite 367]
23 - Chapter 16 Decision-making for Occupation-centred Practice with Children [Seite 371]
23.1 - Introduction [Seite 371]
23.2 - Decision-making and information sources [Seite 372]
23.3 - Information from clients, families and their contexts [Seite 373]
23.3.1 - The child's age and developmental stage [Seite 373]
23.4 - The child's current abilities and functioning across different environmental contexts [Seite 375]
23.4.1 - The child's personal characteristics, interests and motivators [Seite 377]
23.4.2 - Health and history of previous intervention [Seite 377]
23.4.3 - Home environment and family functioning [Seite 378]
23.4.4 - What the family wants and expects from the service [Seite 378]
23.5 - Information about the practice context [Seite 378]
23.6 - Information from empirical research [Seite 379]
23.6.1 - Is it applicable to my practice? [Seite 380]
23.6.2 - Does it tell me all I need to know? [Seite 381]
23.6.3 - Structures and supports for accessing, interpreting and applying research [Seite 381]
23.7 - Information from clinical experience [Seite 382]
23.8 - Integrating information given alternatives and uncertainties [Seite 383]
23.8.1 - Evidence-based practice and decision-making [Seite 383]
23.8.2 - Clinical reasoning [Seite 385]
23.8.3 - Choosing and combining intervention approaches [Seite 386]
23.9 - Shared decision-making [Seite 387]
23.10 - Conclusion [Seite 389]
23.11 - References [Seite 390]
24 - Appendix 1 Assessments Referred to Throughout the Book [Seite 395]
25 - Index [Seite 399]
26 - EULA [Seite 410]

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