Geoheritage

Assessment, Protection, and Management
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 5. Dezember 2017
  • |
  • 482 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-809542-3 (ISBN)
 

For the last 20 years there has been a growing interest in the geosciences for topics related to geoheritage: geoconservation, geotourism and geoparks. Geoheritage: Assessment, Protection, and Management is the first and only reference book to cover these main topics as well as the relationship of geoheritage to other subjects such as landscapes, conservation, and tourism. The book also includes methodologies for assessment, mapping, and visualisation, along with case studies and colour images of some of the most important global geosites. This book is an essential resource for geoscientists, park and geopark managers, tourism and regional planning managers, as well as university students interested in geoheritage, geosites, geomorphosites, geoconservation, and geotourism. It also includes critical information on UNESCO's Global Geoparks, World Heritage and Biosphere Reserve sites, national parks and protected areas in general, land-use planning and nature conservation policies, and in the general contribution of geodiversity for sustainable development.

  • Written by a panel of 46 authors from 14 countries in all continents
  • Based on conceptual, methodological, and applied research carried out by academics and practitioners
  • Includes 160 colour images and maps of geoheritage sites
  • Features six case studies from sites in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and South America
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • USA
  • 16,45 MB
978-0-12-809542-3 (9780128095423)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Geoheritage
  • Copyright Page
  • Photo Credit
  • Cover images
  • Main photograph
  • Lower left
  • Lower central
  • Lower right
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Biographies
  • Acknowledgements
  • I. Introduction
  • Geoheritage: A Multidisciplinary and Applied Research Topic
  • Twenty-Five Years of Development
  • Objectives of the Book
  • Assessment
  • Protection
  • Management
  • Organisation of the Book
  • References
  • II. Geodiversity
  • 1 Geodiversity: The Backbone of Geoheritage and Geoconservation
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Geodiversity as the Backbone of Geoheritage
  • 1.3 Geodiversity as the Backbone of Valuing Abiotic Nature
  • 1.4 Geodiversity as a Backbone of Geoconservation
  • 1.4.1 International Geoconservation Site Networks
  • 1.4.2 National Geoheritage Site Selection
  • 1.5 Examples
  • 1.5.1 Araripe Global Geopark, Brazil
  • 1.5.2 The Washington Monument, Washington, DC, USA
  • 1.5.3 Marine Geodiversity and Geoheritage, Scotland
  • 1.5.4 Geoconservation in Antarctica
  • 1.5.5 Geodiversity of Construction Materials
  • 1.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • 2 Methods for Assessing Geodiversity
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Geodiversity Assessment and Mapping
  • 2.2.1 Geodiversity Assessment
  • 2.2.2 Criteria Used for the Assessment
  • 2.2.3 Geodiversity Mapping
  • 2.3 Typologies of Methods for the Assessment of Geodiversity
  • 2.3.1 Direct and Indirect Methods
  • 2.3.2 Qualitative Methods
  • 2.3.3 Quantitative Methods
  • 2.3.3.1 Indices
  • 2.3.3.2 Map Algebra
  • 2.3.4 Qualitative-Quantitative Methods
  • 2.3.5 Case Study: Debnica Catchment
  • 2.4 Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 3 Geodiversity Action Plans - A Method to Facilitate, Structure, Inform and Record Action for Geodiversity
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Geodiversity Actions Plans
  • 3.3 What Makes a Successful GAP?
  • 3.4 Why Produce a GAP?
  • 3.5 Case Studies
  • 3.5.1 Case Study 1 - Local Geodiversity Action Plan Production and Reflection
  • 3.5.2 Case Study 2 - London Geodiversity Action Plan: An Urban GAP
  • 3.5.3 Case Study 3 - Company Geodiversity Action Plans (cGAPs)
  • 3.5.4 Case Study 4 - UK Geodiversity Action Plan (UKGAP)
  • 3.6 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • III. Geoheritage
  • 4 Geoheritage: inventories and evaluation
  • 4.1 What Makes an Element of Geodiversity Exceptional?
  • 4.2 How Should the High Value of Geodiversity Elements Be Identified and Characterised?
  • 4.3 Why and How Should Geoheritage Be Assessed?
  • 4.4 Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 5 The Specificities of Geomorphological Heritage
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Geomorphological Heritage and Geomorphosites: Definitions
  • 5.3 Geomorphosites: Peculiar Characteristics
  • 5.4 Heritage Geomorphology: A New Branch of the Geomorphological Sciences?
  • 5.5 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • 6 Fossils, Heritage and Conservation: Managing Demands on a Precious Resource
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.1.1 Fossils in Folklore and Culture
  • 6.1.2 Fossils and Science
  • 6.1.3 The Rise of the 'Rock Hound' - and Fossils Become a Commodity
  • 6.1.4 The Rise of the 'Conservation Manager'
  • 6.2 Why Conserve Fossils?
  • 6.3 Managing Sites of Palaeontological Importance
  • 6.3.1 The Nature of the Geological Resource
  • 6.3.2 The Nature of the Scientific Resource
  • 6.3.3 Threats to the Resource and Management Solutions
  • 6.4 Legal Approaches to Conserving Palaeontological Heritage, i.e., Protected Sites Versus Protected Heritage
  • 6.4.1 Legal Measures
  • 6.4.2 International Initiatives
  • 6.5 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 7 Geoheritage and Museums
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Geological Collections: What Is Specific About Them?
  • 7.3 Collections, Research and Expertise
  • 7.3.1 Importance of Collections for Research
  • 7.3.2 Information and Collections
  • 7.3.3 New Technologies and Old Objects
  • 7.4 Which Value for Collections?
  • 7.5 Collections and Museums
  • 7.6 Legal Framework
  • 7.6.1 Acquisition
  • 7.6.2 Protection of Ex Situ Geoheritage
  • 7.6.3 Three Examples: France, South Africa and Turkey
  • 7.7 Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 8 The Landscape and the Cultural Value of Geoheritage
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 The Landscape Value of Geoheritage
  • 8.2.1 Landscape
  • 8.2.2 Landscape and Geoheritage
  • 8.2.3 The Question of the Aesthetics
  • 8.3 The Cultural Value of Geoheritage
  • 8.3.1 Cultural Geology
  • 8.3.2 Geoheritage and Culture
  • 8.3.2.1 Influence of geology on cultural assets
  • 8.3.2.2 Influence of culture on the perception of geoheritage
  • 8.3.2.3 Geocultural heritage
  • 8.4 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 9 Geomining Heritage as a Tool to Promote the Social Development of Rural Communities
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Rehabilitated Mines as a New Resource: Sustainability, Education and Geotourism
  • 9.3 Impacts of the Use of Geomining Heritage: An Opportunity for Development
  • 9.4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 10 GSSPs as International Geostandards and as Global Geoheritage
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 ICS and the International Chronostratigraphic Chart
  • 10.3 Preservation and Maintenance of GSSPs
  • 10.4 GSSPs at Zumaia, Basque Coast UNESCO Global Geopark
  • 10.4.1 Geological Context and Description
  • 10.4.2 Protected GSSPs in the Basque Coast UNESCO Global Geopark: Supporting Scientific Research and Promoting Geoconservat...
  • 10.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • IV. Geoheritage and Conservation
  • 11 The Conservation of Geosites: Principles and Practice
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Why Conserve Geosites?
  • 11.3 Principles of Geosite Conservation
  • 11.4 Conservation Frameworks
  • 11.4.1 Generic Geosite Conservation Framework
  • 11.4.1.1 Geosite audit and selection
  • 11.4.1.2 Conservation needs analysis
  • 11.4.1.3 Conservation planning and delivery
  • 11.4.2 Application of Conservation Frameworks
  • 11.4.2.1 The Site Type conservation framework applied in Great Britain
  • 11.4.2.2 Risk of Degradation conservation framework applied in La Rioja, northern Spain
  • 11.5 Conservation and Management in Practice
  • 11.5.1 Conservation of a Geosite on the Coast: Lyme Regis to Charmouth Coastline, Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, Dorse...
  • 11.5.2 Conservation of a Geosite in Operating and Disused Quarries: Whittlesey Brick Pits and Kings Dyke Nature Reserve, Pe...
  • 11.5.3 Conservation of Inland Geosites Containing Sensitive and Fragile Fossils: La Rioja, Northern Spain
  • 11.5.4 Conservation of an Inland Integrity Geosite: La Risca Gorge, Segovia, Central Spain
  • 11.6 Conclusions and Future Challenges
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 12 Geoheritage Conservation and Environmental Policies: Retrospect and Prospect
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Trends in the Development of Geoconservation
  • 12.2.1 Geoconservation Origins and Early Steps
  • 12.2.2 Establishing Statutory Protection: Landscapes
  • 12.2.3 Establishing Statutory Protection: Sites
  • 12.2.4 Moving Towards Integration: Linking Nature and People
  • 12.3 Geoconservation: Assessment of Progress
  • 12.4 Future Directions in Geoconservation
  • 12.4.1 Mainstreaming Geoconservation Into Civil Society
  • 12.4.2 Improving the Scientific Basis for Geoheritage Conservation
  • 12.4.3 Mainstreaming Geoheritage Conservation Into Nature Conservation, the Ecosystem Approach and Sustainable Development
  • 12.4.4 Integrating Geoheritage Conservation in Protected Area Planning and Management
  • 12.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 13 Geoheritage and World Heritage Sites
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 World Heritage - Concept and Implementation
  • 13.3 Geoheritage on the World Heritage List
  • 13.3.1 Criteria of Inscription - Scope for Protection of Geoheritage
  • 13.3.2 Representation
  • 13.3.3 Earth Science Themes
  • 13.4 Examples
  • 13.4.1 Palaeontological Site - Messel Pit
  • 13.4.2 Structural Geology Site - Tectonic Arena of Sardona
  • 13.4.3 Dynamic Earth Site - Yellowstone
  • 13.4.4 Geomorphological Site - South China Karst
  • 13.4.5 Evidence of Climate Change - Kvarken and High Coast
  • 13.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • 14 Geoheritage and Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
  • 14.1 Geoheritage as a Resource and Support of Services and Activities
  • 14.2 An Analysis of the Main Impacts on Geoheritage
  • 14.3 Environmental Impact Assessment
  • 14.4 The Integration of Geoheritage in the EIA Procedures
  • 14.5 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • V. Uses of Geoheritage
  • 15 Geoheritage: Getting the Message Across. What Message and to Whom?
  • Introduction
  • Who Are We Trying to Communicate With?
  • What Do 'Normal' People Know? What Do They Want to Know? What Do We Want to Tell Them?
  • Starting Talking About Geoheritage Where People Are.
  • What Is Interpretation?
  • Producing an Interpretation Strategy
  • 'Themes' - Do You Hum Them?
  • 'Words, Words, Words.'
  • 'Dumbing Down', But Maintaining Scientific Integrity
  • 'Did You Know?' - Is That Interactive?
  • Getting the Geoconservation Message Across - Keeping the Geoheritage Safe
  • Keeping Normal People Safe
  • Keeping the Interpretation Safe
  • 'Don't Go With Stranglers'
  • Just Add Humans.
  • Have You Been Wasting Your Time? EXTERMINATE, EXTERMINATE, EXTERMINATE
  • Look at Me!
  • Pick Me Up! Pick ME Up!
  • Reconstructions or One Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words
  • Guided Walks? They Are so Expensive!
  • Visitor Centres and Museums
  • Time Lines, Geological Gardens, Rocky Maps and Walls and Stratigraphic Sections
  • Land Art - and Ecovandalism?
  • New, and Not so New, Media
  • Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 16 Digital Geovisualisation Technologies Applied to Geoheritage Management
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 The Visualisation of Geoheritage: Strengths and Weaknesses
  • 16.3 Visualisation for Risk Assessment and Site Monitoring
  • 16.3.1 High-Resolution Imaging in Yosemite National Park
  • 16.3.2 3D Models of the Valley of Geysers in Kamchatka
  • 16.4 Visualisation for Geotourism and Geointerpretation
  • 16.4.1 3D Model for Prehistoric Cave Replicas
  • 16.4.2 The Collection of Mobile Applications GeoGuide
  • 16.5 Development Perspectives in Digital Geoheritage Visualisation
  • 16.5.1 Open Data and Crowdsourcing
  • 16.5.2 The Question of Interactivity
  • 16.5.3 Digital Technologies and Geovisualisation
  • 16.5.4 The 'Sense of Place' of Virtual Geoheritage
  • 16.6 Conclusion: New Frontiers for Geovisualisation
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 17 Geoheritage and Geotourism
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Relationships Between Geoheritage and Geotourism
  • 17.3 Examples of Relationships Between Geotourism and Geoheritage
  • 17.3.1 Geotourism and Geoparks as Illustrated via Hong Kong Geoheritage
  • 17.3.2 Tourism Where Soils and Regolith Are Geoheritage
  • 17.3.3 Tourism Where Fossils Are Geoheritage
  • 17.3.4 Tourism Where Volcanic Rocks and Landforms Are Geoheritage
  • 17.3.5 Tourism in Large Areas or Landscapes That Are Considered as Geoheritage
  • 17.4 The Critical Relationship Between Geoheritage and Geotourism
  • 17.5 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 18 Geoheritage and Geoparks
  • 18.1 Geoparks: The Dawn of an Innovative Concept
  • 18.2 Geoheritage in UNESCO Global Geoparks
  • 18.3 Management of Geoheritage in Geoparks
  • 18.3.1 Characterisation of Geoheritage in Geoparks
  • 18.3.2 Conservation of Geoheritage in Geoparks
  • 18.3.3 Education and Interpretation of Geoheritage in Geoparks
  • 18.4 Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • VI. Case Studies
  • 19 Potential Geoheritage Sites in Ethiopia: Challenges of Their Promotion and Conservation
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Geological and Geomorphological Setting
  • 19.3 Geoheritage Sites in Ethiopia
  • 19.4 Geoheritage Promotion and Conservation Challenges
  • References
  • 20 Geodiversity and Geoconservation in Land Management in Tasmania - A Top-Down Approach
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Background
  • 20.3 Geoconservation on Reserved Land
  • 20.4 Geoconservation in Tasmanian Forestry
  • 20.4.1 Development of Awareness of Geoconservation
  • 20.4.2 Care of Geodiversity in Forests Today
  • 20.5 The Tasmanian Geoconservation Database
  • 20.6 Conclusions and Outlook
  • References
  • 21 Geoheritage Evaluation of Caves in Korea: A Case Study of Limestone Caves
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Natural Caves in South Korea
  • 21.3 Legal Protection of Natural Caves in Korea
  • 21.4 Establishment of the Evaluation Criteria
  • 21.5 Evaluation Procedure and Results
  • 21.6 Final Considerations
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 22 Managing Conservation, Research, and Interpretation of Geoheritage Assets at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, C...
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Assessment of Palaeontological Assets
  • 22.2.1 Inventory and Monitoring of Palaeontological Sites
  • 22.2.2 Survey of Collections and Publications
  • 22.3 Conservation Management
  • 22.3.1 Conservation of Museum Collections
  • 22.3.2 Conservation of In Situ Petrified Tree Stumps
  • 22.4 Scientific Research and Management
  • 22.5 Interpretation and Education
  • 22.6 Practical Functionality of a Palaeontology Programme
  • 22.7 Human Impacts
  • 22.8 Aspirations and Challenges in Achieving Geopark Designation
  • 22.9 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 23 Varvite Park, A Brazilian Initiative for the Conservation and Interpretation of Geoheritage
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.1.1 Brazilian Geological Context
  • 23.1.2 Geoconservation in Brazil
  • 23.2 The Varvite Park
  • 23.2.1 Geological Setting
  • 23.2.2 Scientific Value
  • 23.2.3 History and Designation of the Geosite
  • 23.2.4 Management and Public Use
  • 23.3 Concluding Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 24 Techniques for the Monitoring of Geosites in Cabañeros National Park, Spain
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Geoheritage in the Cabañeros National Park
  • 24.2.1 Boquerón del Estena Trace Fossil Geosite
  • 24.2.2 El Chorro de los Navalucillos Waterfall Geosite
  • 24.3 Monitoring Methods
  • 24.4 First Monitoring Results
  • 24.4.1 Geoindicator 1: Physical Weathering
  • 24.4.2 Geoindicator 2: River Floods
  • 24.4.3 Geoindicator 3: Waterfall Discharge
  • 24.5 Guidelines for Geosite Management
  • 24.5.1 Boquerón del Estena Trace Fossil Geosite
  • 24.5.2 El Chorro de los Navalucillos Waterfall Geosite
  • 24.6 Conclusions and Proposals for Future Actions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • VII. Conclusion
  • Geoheritage and Geoconservation: The Challenges
  • The Present Situation
  • International Stage
  • National Stage
  • Local Stage
  • Building the Future
  • International Stage
  • National Stage
  • Local Stage
  • Challenges for the Research
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

164,22 €
inkl. 5% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen