A Practical Guide to Construction Adjudication

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 22. Oktober 2015
  • |
  • 768 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-71793-6 (ISBN)
 
In the United Kingdom, adjudication is available as a right for parties to a construction contract, following the enactment of the Housing Grants Construction and Regeneration Act 1996. In general, within a comparatively short period of time, parties in dispute will have a decision from an adjudicator, which, except in limited circumstances, the courts will enforce. Adjudication has become the number one method of dispute resolution in the construction industry.
The short timescale means that a party needs to know what to do, when to do it and be able to check that the other party and the adjudicator are following the right steps. A Practical Guide to Construction Adjudication gives parties the necessary information to achieve this. It provides a straightforward overview of the process and procedure of adjudication by reference to legislation and case law, augmented with practical guidance including suggestions on what to do or not to do, drafting tips and checklists. Separate chapters for Scotland and Northern Ireland identify and explain the differences in procedure and judicial interpretation between those jurisdictions and England and Wales, and further detailed explanations of the adjudication regimes in Australia, Ireland, Malaysia, New Zealand and Singapore are included. Each of the chapters on jurisdictions outside England and Wales has been written by senior experts in those jurisdictions to ensure the content is accurate and insightful.
There are a range of helpful appendices including a bank of model form adjudication documents and tabulated detailed comparisons of the Scheme for Construction Contracts, the other major adjudication rules, the major adjudicator nominating bodies and the UK and international regimes. Readers will particularly appreciate the most comprehensive index of adjudication cases available, sorted into 260 subject headings providing immediate access to all the reported cases on any adjudication topic.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
James Pickavance is a partner in the construction and engineering practice of Eversheds LLP, specialising in dispute resolution. He has experience of all forms of dispute resolution, in particular contractual and statutory adjudication, domestic and international arbitration, expert determination, mediation and litigation, and advises public bodies, governments, international corporations and private clients on domestic and international, single or multi-jurisdictional disputes across a range of industry sectors in over 20 jurisdictions.
  • A Practical Guide to Construction Adjudication
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgements
  • Contents
  • Part 1 The United Kingdom
  • Chapter 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Overview
  • 1.2 Background to statutory adjudication in the UK
  • 1.3 Statutory adjudication regimes
  • 1.4 Use of case law in this part
  • Chapter 2 Adjudication in a nutshell
  • Chapter 3 Deciding to adjudicate
  • 3.1 Overview
  • 3.2 Do I have a claim?
  • 3.3 Is it worth it?
  • 3.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 3.3.2 Amount in dispute
  • 3.3.3 Likely recovery
  • 3.3.4 Professional fees
  • 3.3.5 Resources
  • 3.3.6 Relationships
  • 3.4 Is adjudication the right forum?
  • 3.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 3.4.2 Advantages
  • 3.4.3 Disadvantages
  • 3.4.4 Statistics
  • 3.5 Other forms of 'rapid' dispute resolution
  • 3.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 3.5.2 Early neutral evaluation
  • 3.5.3 Expert determination
  • 3.5.4 Mediation
  • 3.5.5 Fast-track arbitration
  • 3.5.6 Statutory demand or winding-up petition
  • 3.5.7 Part 8 claim
  • 3.5.8 Summary judgment
  • 3.6 Adjudication on behalf of, or against, an insolvent party
  • 3.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 3.6.2 Why do it?
  • 3.6.3 Trigger for insolvency
  • 3.6.4 Liquidation
  • 3.6.5 Voluntary or compulsory administration
  • 3.6.6 Administrative receivership
  • 3.6.7 A company voluntary arrangement (CVA)
  • 3.6.8 Bankruptcy
  • 3.6.9 Individual voluntary arrangement (IVA)
  • 3.6.10 Problems enforcing the adjudicators decision
  • 3.7 Who to involve
  • 3.7.1 In a nutshell
  • 3.7.2 In-house lawyers
  • 3.7.3 External lawyers
  • 3.7.4 Claims consultants
  • 3.7.5 Experts
  • 3.7.6 Project team
  • 3.8 Checklist: considering whether or not to adjudicate
  • Chapter 4 Statutory adjudication
  • 4.1 Overview
  • 4.2 Old or new act
  • 4.3 Existence and terms of a contract
  • 4.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.3.2 Contract formation and terms
  • 4.3.3 Contract terminated
  • 4.3.4 Void or voidable contract
  • 4.3.5 Choice of terms
  • 4.3.6 Incorporation of terms
  • 4.4 Construction contract
  • 4.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.4.2 Carrying out, arranging, providing labour for construction operations (Act s. 104(1))
  • 4.4.3 Consultants and advisers (Act s. 104(2))
  • 4.4.4 Contracts of employment (Act s. 104(3))
  • 4.4.5 Construction operations and other matters (Act s. 104(5))
  • 4.4.6 Application of the Act to contracts (Act s. 104(6))
  • 4.4.7 Ancillary agreements
  • 4.5 Construction operations
  • 4.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.5.2 Definition of construction operations (Act s. 105(1))
  • 4.6 Excluded construction operations
  • 4.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.6.2 Approach to interpreting the exclusion provisions at section 105(2) of the Act
  • 4.6.3 Courts approach to applying the exclusions at subsection 105(2)
  • 4.6.4 Drilling and extraction (Act s. 105(2)(a) and (b))
  • 4.6.5 Assembly, installation, erection, demolition in connection with certain activities (Act s. 105(2)(c))
  • 4.6.6 Manufacture, delivery, installation (Act s. 105(2)(d))
  • 4.7 Excluded agreements
  • 4.7.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.7.2 Residential occupier (Act s. 106(1)(a) and (2))
  • 4.7.3 Exclusion Order (2009 Act, s. 106A
  • 1996 Act, s. 106(1)(b))
  • 4.8 Contract in writing
  • 4.8.1 In a nutshell
  • 4.8.2 2009 Act
  • 4.8.3 1996 Act only applies to agreements in writing (1996 Act s. 107(1))
  • 4.8.4 'In writing' (1996 Act s. 107(2))
  • 4.8.5 An agreement made 'otherwise than in writing' (1996 Act s. 107(3))
  • 4.8.6 An agreement 'evidenced in writing' (1996 Act s. 107(4))
  • 4.8.7 'An exchange of written submissions in adjudication proceedings' (1996 Act s. 107(5))
  • 4.8.8 Scenarios
  • 4.9 Checklist: What form of adjudication am I subject to?
  • Chapter 5 Contractual and ad hoc adjudication
  • 5.1 Overview
  • 5.2 Contractual adjudication
  • 5.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 5.2.2 What is a contractual adjudication?
  • 5.2.3 Treatment of contractual adjudications by the court
  • 5.3 Ad hoc adjudication
  • 5.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 5.3.2 Ad hoc adjudication by choice
  • 5.3.3 Ad hoc jurisdiction by mistake
  • 5.3.4 Ad hoc jurisdiction on issues
  • Chapter 6 Adjudication procedure
  • 6.1 Overview
  • 6.2 Scheme
  • 6.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 6.2.2 Does the Scheme apply and the failure to comply with section 108(1)-(4) (Act s. 108(5) and 114(4))
  • 6.2.3 Why choose the Scheme?
  • 6.2.4 Scheme variants
  • 6.3 Contractual procedures
  • 6.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 6.3.2 JCT
  • 6.3.3 ICE/ICC
  • 6.3.4 IChemE
  • 6.3.5 NEC
  • 6.3.6 TeCSA
  • 6.3.7 CIC
  • 6.3.8 CEDR Solve
  • 6.3.9 Bespoke rules
  • 6.4 Checklist: What adjudication procedure am I subject to?
  • Chapter 7 Preconditions and restrictions to statutory adjudication
  • 7.1 Overview
  • 7.2 Is there a dispute?
  • 7.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.2.2 Courts approach
  • 7.2.3 A claim must have been made
  • 7.2.4 The meaning of 'dispute' (Act s.108(1))
  • 7.2.5 The point at which to assess whether or not there is a dispute
  • 7.2.6 Time period following a claim until a dispute is formed
  • 7.2.7 Ambush
  • 7.2.8 Scenarios
  • 7.3 More than one dispute
  • 7.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.3.2 More than one dispute (Act s. 108(1))
  • 7.3.3 The Scheme (Scheme p. 8)
  • 7.4 Substantially the same dispute (Scheme p. 9)
  • 7.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.4.2 Substantially the same dispute
  • 7.5 Does the dispute arise 'under' the contract (Act s. 108(1))?
  • 7.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.5.2 Meaning of 'under' the contract
  • 7.6 More than one contract
  • 7.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.6.2 More than one contract (Act s. 108(1))
  • 7.6.3 Scheme (Scheme p. 8(2))
  • 7.7 Commencing an adjudication 'at any time'
  • 7.7.1 In a nutshell
  • 7.7.2 Act (Act s. 108(2)(a))
  • 7.7.3 Conclusivity clauses
  • 7.7.4 Statutory limitation
  • 7.7.5 Insolvent party
  • Chapter 8 Adjudication strategy
  • 8.1 Overview
  • 8.2 Commencing the adjudication process
  • 8.2.1 Choosing the right time to start
  • 8.2.2 Getting in there first
  • 8.3 More than one adjudication
  • 8.3.1 Multiple adjudications during the project
  • 8.3.2 Concurrent adjudications
  • 8.4 Choosing the dispute to refer
  • 8.4.1 Appropriate expertise
  • 8.4.2 Pecuniary and declaratory claims
  • 8.4.3 Contractual interpretation
  • 8.4.4 'Smash and grab'
  • 8.4.5 'Cherry-picking'
  • 8.4.6 Large-scale adjudications
  • 8.4.7 Without prejudice correspondence
  • 8.5 Deploying arguments
  • 8.5.1 Save the best until last
  • 8.5.2 Reverse ambush
  • 8.6 Assessing the other partys willingness and ability to pay
  • 8.6.1 Securing assets before the adjudication
  • 8.6.2 Can the other party pay?
  • 8.7 Removing procedural uncertainty
  • 8.7.1 Taking a jurisdiction point early
  • Chapter 9 Initiating the adjudication
  • 9.1 Overview
  • 9.2 A precis on jurisdiction and natural justice
  • 9.3 Notice of adjudication
  • 9.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 9.3.2 The Scheme (Scheme p. 1(2) and (3))
  • 9.3.3 Practical considerations
  • 9.4 Checklist: Before serving the notice of adjudication - referring party
  • 9.5 Checklist: On receiving the notice of adjudication - responding party
  • 9.6 Appointing the adjudicator
  • 9.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 9.6.2 Timing (Act s. 108(2)(b), Scheme p. 7)
  • 9.6.3 Appointment procedure (Scheme p. 2, 3, 5 and 6)
  • 9.6.4 Inoperable procedure or defective appointment
  • 9.6.5 Appointment by an ANB
  • 9.6.6 Choosing the right ANB where one is not specified
  • 9.6.7 Forum shopping
  • 9.6.8 Appointment of an individual named in the contract
  • 9.6.9 Nominated or appointed adjudicator too busy, unwilling or unable to act
  • 9.6.10 Natural person and no conflict of interest (Scheme, p. 4)
  • 9.6.11 Objections to the appointed adjudicator (Scheme, p. 10)
  • 9.6.12 A partys assessment of an adjudicators capability
  • 9.6.13 The prospective adjudicators assessment of whether he should accept the appointment
  • 9.6.14 Post appointment before the dispute is referred
  • 9.6.15 Adjudicators agreement
  • 9.6.16 Revoking the adjudicators appointment (Scheme p. 11)
  • 9.7 Checklist: Appointing the adjudicator - referring party
  • 9.8 Checklist: Appointing the adjudicator - responding party
  • 9.9 Checklist: Accepting the appointment - adjudicator
  • Chapter 10 The adjudication
  • 10.1 Overview
  • 10.2 Referral notice
  • 10.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 10.2.2 Timing (Act s. 108(2)(b))
  • 10.2.3 Scheme (Scheme p. 7)
  • 10.2.4 Practical considerations and strategy
  • 10.2.5 Actions for the adjudicator once the dispute is referred
  • 10.3 Response
  • 10.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 10.3.2 Timing
  • 10.3.3 Practical considerations and strategy
  • 10.4 Reply, rejoinder and sur-rejoinder
  • 10.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 10.4.2 Practical considerations and strategy
  • 10.4.3 Parallel correspondence
  • 10.5 Meetings
  • 10.6 Other matters
  • 10.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 10.6.2 Communicating with the other party and with the adjudicator during the adjudication
  • 10.6.3 Pressure from the parties or the adjudicator
  • 10.6.4 Set-off and abatement
  • 10.6.5 Dropping a head of claim during the adjudication
  • 10.6.6 Withdrawing from the adjudication entirely
  • 10.6.7 Privilege
  • 10.6.8 Disclosure of documents
  • 10.6.9 Settlement offers
  • 10.6.10 Staying adjudication proceedings
  • 10.6.11 Confidential nature of adjudication (Scheme p. 18)
  • 10.6.12 Service of documents and notices (Act s. 115)
  • 10.6.13 Reckoning of time (Act s. 116)
  • 10.7 Adjudicators powers and duties
  • 10.7.1 In a nutshell
  • 10.7.2 Duty to act impartially (Act s. 108(2)(e) and Scheme p. 12(a))
  • 10.7.3 Power to take the initiative (Act s. 108(2)(f) and Scheme p. 13)
  • 10.7.4 Power to make requests or directions (Scheme p. 14 and 15)
  • 10.7.5 Power to seek assistance (Act s. 108(2)(f) and Scheme p. 13(f))
  • 10.7.6 Duty to consider relevant information and provide it to the parties (Scheme p. 17)
  • 10.7.7 Scope of what the adjudicator can decide (Scheme p. 20(a) and (b))
  • 10.7.8 Power to award interest (Scheme p. 20(c))
  • 10.7.9 Power to award damages
  • 10.7.10 Adjudicators immunity (Act s. 108(4), Scheme p. 26)
  • 10.7.11 Adjudicator resignation (Scheme p. 9)
  • 10.8 Checklist: Managing the adjudication - the adjudicator
  • Chapter 11 The decision
  • 11.1 Overview
  • 11.2 What is the adjudicator required to do?
  • 11.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 11.2.2 Purpose and nature of the decision
  • 11.2.3 Structure, format and content of the decision
  • 11.2.4 Reasons
  • 11.3 On receiving the decision
  • 11.4 Timing
  • 11.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 11.4.2 Act and Scheme (Act s. 108(2)(c) and (d) and Scheme p.19)
  • 11.4.3 Rigidity of the time limit
  • 11.4.4 Decisionmade and decision communicated
  • 11.4.5 Responding to the adjudicator's request for an extension
  • 11.5 Effect and compliance
  • 11.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 11.5.2 Temporary finality (Act s. 108(3), Scheme p. 23)
  • 11.5.3 Compliance with the decision (Scheme p. 21)
  • 11.5.4 Delaying compliance by contract
  • 11.5.5 Insurance claims
  • Chapter 12 Post decision
  • 12.1 Overview
  • 12.2 Adjudicator's costs
  • 12.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 12.2.2 2009 Act and 2011 Scheme (2009 Act s. 108A
  • 2011 Scheme p. 25)
  • 12.2.3 1996 Act and 1998 Scheme (1998 Scheme p. 25)
  • 12.2.4 Liability for fees
  • 12.2.5 Reasonableness of fees and expenses
  • 12.2.6 Lien on the decision
  • 12.2.7 Payment of fees when the decision is in breach of natural justice
  • 12.2.8 Award of adjudicator's costs
  • 12.2.9 Payment of fees on paying party's insolvency
  • 12.3 Parties' costs
  • 12.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 12.3.2 2009 Act (s. 108A)
  • 12.3.3 1996 Act
  • 12.3.4 The Late Payment of Commercial Debt (Interest) Act 1998
  • 12.4 Apportioning costs
  • 12.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 12.4.2 Timing
  • 12.4.3 Assessment
  • 12.5 Correcting errors in the decision
  • 12.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 12.5.2 The 2009 Act and 2011 Scheme (2009 Act s. 108(3)(A)
  • 2011 Scheme p. 22A)
  • 12.5.3 The 1996 Act and 1998 Scheme
  • 12.6 Setting off against the decision
  • 12.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 12.6.2 General rule and exceptions
  • 12.6.3 Contractual right to set off
  • 12.6.4 Later interim or final certificate
  • 12.6.5 Issuing a withholding or pay less notice
  • 12.6.6 Setting off liquidated damages
  • 12.6.7 Set off permitted but not quantified in the decision
  • 12.6.8 Set-off not formulated before the adjudication
  • 12.6.9 Adjudication rules prevent set-off in enforcement proceedings
  • 12.6.10 Multiple adjudications
  • 12.6.11 Litigation on foot
  • 12.6.12 Arbitration award
  • 12.6.13 Other arguments for set-off
  • Chapter 13 Enforcement: options and procedure
  • 13.1 Overview
  • 13.2 Key statements of principle and the courts policy
  • 13.2.1 Principles of enforcement
  • 13.2.2 Enforcement for contractual adjudications
  • 13.3 TCC summary enforcement procedure
  • 13.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 13.3.2 Nature of summary judgment applications in adjudication
  • 13.3.3 Options for commencing the claim
  • 13.3.4 Commencing the claim
  • 13.3.5 Directions
  • 13.3.6 Responding to the claim
  • 13.3.7 Submission of cost budgets
  • 13.3.8 Hearing bundle and skeletons
  • 13.3.9 Extent of the evidence to be submitted
  • 13.3.10 Judgment in default and setting aside
  • 13.3.11 Representation
  • 13.3.12 Timetable to a decision
  • 13.3.13 The decision
  • 13.3.14 The effect of the courts decision
  • 13.3.15 Setting aside a summary judgment
  • 13.3.16 Costs: basis of assessment
  • 13.3.17 Costs: assessment of the bill of costs
  • 13.3.18 Costs: ATE insurance and conditional fee arrangements
  • 13.3.19 Costs: interest
  • 13.3.20 Costs: settlement reached before summary judgment
  • 13.3.21 Appealing a judgment of the court
  • 13.3.22 Staying enforcement proceedings where there is an arbitration agreement (s.9Arbitration Act 1996)
  • 13.4 Other procedures for enforcement
  • 13.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 13.4.2 Pre-emptory order (1998 Scheme p. 23(1) and 24)
  • 13.4.3 Mandatory injunction
  • 13.4.4 Statutory demand
  • 13.4.5 Scotland
  • 13.5 Complying with an order of the court
  • 13.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 13.5.2 Time for payment
  • 13.5.3 Extending the time for payment
  • 13.5.4 Failing to comply
  • 13.6 Checklist: Avoiding the consequences of an adjudicators decision
  • Chapter 14 Enforcement: insolvency, stay and severability
  • 14.1 Overview
  • 14.2 Insolvency avoids summary judgment
  • 14.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 14.2.2 Liquidation
  • 14.2.3 Administration
  • 14.2.4 Administrative receivership
  • 14.2.5 CVA
  • 14.2.6 Individual insolvency or bankruptcy
  • 14.3 Stay of execution
  • 14.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 14.3.2 Courts discretion to order a stay of execution
  • 14.3.3 Insolvency proceedings pending or not concluded
  • 14.3.4 Financial difficulty
  • 14.3.5 Imminent resolution of other proceedings
  • 14.3.6 Manifest injustice
  • 14.3.7 Other circumstances in which an application for a stay has failed
  • 14.3.8 Partial stay
  • 14.3.9 Conditions imposed on granting the stay
  • 14.3.10 Severability
  • Chapter 15 Final determination
  • 15.1 Overview
  • 15.2 Finalising the adjudicators decision
  • 15.2.1 In a nutshell
  • 15.2.2 Adjudicators decision made final by contract
  • 15.2.3 Adjudicators decision made final by agreement
  • 15.2.4 Adjudicators decision made final by the passing of time
  • 15.3 Adjudication and other proceedings
  • 15.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 15.3.2 Final determination at the same time as enforcement proceedings
  • 15.3.3 Final determination at the same time as adjudication
  • 15.3.4 Final determination without complying with the adjudicators decision
  • 15.3.5 Final determination in breach of the contractual dispute resolution procedure (including an agreement to adjudicate)
  • 15.4 Commencement, onus of proof and costs
  • 15.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 15.4.2 Cause of action and limitation period for commencing final proceedings
  • 15.4.3 Delaying the final determination
  • 15.4.4 Onus of proof in subsequent proceedings
  • 15.4.5 Final decision different to adjudicators decision
  • 15.4.6 Recovery of adjudication costs as part of the costs of a final determination
  • Chapter 16 The adjudicators jurisdiction
  • 16.1 Overview
  • 16.2 When to think about jurisdiction
  • 16.3 Options when a jurisdictional issue arises
  • 16.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 16.3.2 Option 1: Determination from the court
  • 16.3.3 Option 2: Determination by the adjudicator
  • 16.3.4 Option 3: Determination from another adjudicator
  • 16.3.5 Option 4: Reserve the position and proceed with the adjudication
  • 16.3.6 Option 5: Withdraw
  • 16.3.7 Option 6: Injunction
  • 16.4 Losing the right to challenge the adjudicators jurisdiction
  • 16.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 16.4.2 Waiver
  • 16.4.3 No reservation or late reservation
  • 16.4.4 Abandoning the reservation
  • 16.4.5 Initial consent before objection
  • 16.4.6 Approbation and reprobation
  • 16.4.7 Consequence of losing the right: ad hoc jurisdiction
  • 16.5 Threshold jurisdiction challenges
  • 16.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 16.5.2 No contract
  • 16.5.3 Contract is not a construction contract
  • 16.5.4 Construction contract is not in writing
  • 16.5.5 No dispute
  • 16.5.6 More than one dispute
  • 16.5.7 Substantially the same dispute
  • 16.5.8 Dispute not under the contract
  • 16.6 Process jurisdiction challenges
  • 16.6.1 In a nutshell
  • 16.6.2 Incorrect parties named
  • 16.6.3 Adjudicator not correctly appointed
  • 16.6.4 Referral notice served out of time
  • 16.6.5 Arguments outside the scope of the dispute
  • 16.6.6 Defective service
  • 16.6.7 New material during the adjudication
  • 16.6.8 Other procedural improprieties
  • 16.7 Decision based jurisdiction challenges
  • 16.7.1 In a nutshell
  • 16.7.2 Lien over the decision
  • 16.7.3 Failure to reach the decision within the required timescale
  • 16.7.4 Signing the decision
  • 16.7.5 Sufficiency of written reasons
  • 16.7.6 Scope of the decision
  • 16.7.7 Errors
  • 16.7.8 Correcting minor errors in the decision
  • 16.8 Checklist: Jurisdiction - the parties
  • 16.9 Checklist: Jurisdiction - the adjudicator
  • Chapter 17 Natural justice
  • 17.1 Overview
  • 17.1.1 What is it?
  • 17.1.2 Materiality
  • 17.2 When to think about natural justice
  • 17.3 Options when a natural justice point arises
  • 17.4 Bias and apparent bias
  • 17.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 17.4.2 Actual bias
  • 17.4.3 Apparent bias
  • 17.4.4 Prior involvement in the project or in a separate dispute
  • 17.4.5 Appointment of the same adjudicator
  • 17.4.6 Communication between the adjudicator and one party: pre-appointment
  • 17.4.7 Communication between the adjudicator and one party: post-appointment
  • 17.4.8 Evidence
  • 17.4.9 Failure to make information available to the parties
  • 17.4.10 Failure to carry out a site visit
  • 17.4.11 Organisation of meetings and hearings
  • 17.4.12 Quasi-mediator
  • 17.4.13 Without prejudice communications
  • 17.4.14 Preliminary view
  • 17.5 Procedural fairness
  • 17.5.1 In a nutshell
  • 17.5.2 Referring partys conduct pre-adjudication
  • 17.5.3 Abuse of process
  • 17.5.4 Ambush/no opportunity or insufficient opportunity to respond
  • 17.5.5 Christmas claims
  • 17.5.6 Dispute is too large or complex
  • 17.5.7 Failing to address an issue, part of a submission or evidence
  • 17.5.8 Failure to permit a further submission or information
  • 17.5.9 Failure to follow the agreed procedure
  • 17.5.10 Adjudicators timetable unfair
  • 17.5.11 Documents received late or not at all
  • 17.5.12 Failure to inform the parties about an approach taken or methodology used
  • 17.5.13 Failure to inform the parties about advice from a third party
  • 17.5.14 Failure to inform the parties about use of own knowledge and expertise
  • 17.5.15 Failure to inform the parties about preliminary view
  • 17.5.16 Sufficiency of reasons
  • 17.6 Checklist: Natural justice - the parties and the adjudicator
  • Chapter 18 Further grounds for resisting enforcement
  • 18.1 Overview
  • 18.2 Fraud or deceit
  • 18.3 Duress
  • 18.4 UTCCR
  • 18.5 Human Rights Act
  • Chapter 19 Scotland: Tony Jones
  • 19.1 Overview
  • 19.2 Differences between the Scheme and the Scottish Scheme
  • 19.2.1 1998 Scheme and 1998 Scottish Scheme
  • 19.2.2 2011 Scheme and 2011 Scottish Scheme
  • 19.3 Enforcement of an adjudicators award
  • 19.3.1 In a nutshell
  • 19.3.2 Enforcement procedure
  • 19.3.3 Counterclaims
  • 19.3.4 The Scottish courts approach to jurisdictional challenges
  • 19.3.5 The Scottish courts approach to natural justice challenges
  • 19.3.6 Miscellaneous points
  • 19.4 Issues of divergence between England and Wales and Scotland
  • 19.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 19.4.2 Failure to comply with subsections 108(1)-(4) of the Act
  • 19.4.3 Adjudicators decision out of time
  • 19.4.4 Parties costs under the 1996 Act
  • 19.4.5 Insolvency
  • 19.4.6 Approbation and reprobation
  • 19.4.7 The size and nature of the claim
  • 19.4.8 Abuse of process
  • 19.4.9 The adjudicator taking advice from a third party or using his own knowledge
  • 19.4.10 Human Rights Act
  • Chapter 20 Northern Ireland: Michael Humphreys QC
  • 20.1 Overview
  • 20.2 Enforcement of adjudicators awards
  • 20.2.1 The writ of summons
  • 20.2.2 The application for summary judgment
  • 20.2.3 The hearing of the application
  • 20.2.4 Incidence of costs
  • 20.2.5 Taxation of costs
  • 20.2.6 Enforcement of judgments
  • 20.3 An alternative remedy - declaratory relief
  • 20.4 Judicial consideration
  • 20.4.1 In a nutshell
  • 20.4.2 No construction contract
  • 20.4.3 No dispute
  • 20.4.4 Setting off against an adjudicators decision
  • 20.4.5 Financial difficulty of the paying party
  • 20.4.6 Insufficient time to respond
  • 20.4.7 Abuse of process
  • Part 2 International
  • Chapter 21 Introduction
  • Chapter 22 Australia: Peter Wood and Phillip Greenham
  • 22.1 Overview
  • 22.1.1 Initial introduction in NSW
  • 22.1.2 Rollout across the remaining states
  • 22.1.3 East-west coast divide
  • 22.1.4 Consequences of the divide
  • 22.2 Requirements for commencing an adjudication
  • 22.2.1 Construction contract
  • 22.2.2 Construction work
  • 22.2.3 Claimable variations and excluded amounts in Victoria
  • 22.2.4 Reference date
  • 22.2.5 Time limits
  • 22.2.6 Who may refer a dispute under a construction contract to adjudication?
  • 22.3 Adjudication process
  • 22.3.1 Appointment of the adjudicator
  • 22.3.2 Conduct of the adjudication
  • 22.4 Determination, effect and costs
  • 22.4.1 Form of the decision
  • 22.4.2 Effect of the decision
  • 22.4.3 Costs
  • 22.5 Enforcement
  • 22.5.1 Process for enforcement
  • 22.5.2 Express rights of appeal
  • 22.5.3 Judicial review of adjudication determinations
  • Chapter 23 Ireland: Dermot McEvoy
  • 23.1 Overview
  • 23.2 Requirements for commencing an adjudication
  • 23.3 Adjudication process
  • 23.3.1 Notice of adjudication
  • 23.3.2 Appointment of an adjudicator
  • 23.3.3 Powers and duties of an adjudicator
  • 23.4 Determination, effect and costs
  • 23.5 Enforcement
  • 23.6 Conclusion
  • Chapter 24 Malaysia: Philip Koh
  • 24.1 Overview
  • 24.2 Requirements for commencing the adjudication process
  • 24.2.1 What contracts are caught by the 2012 Act?
  • 24.2.2 Retrospective effect of the 2012 Act
  • 24.3 Adjudication process
  • 24.3.1 Step 1: Payment claim
  • 24.3.2 Step 2: Initiation of adjudication
  • 24.3.3 Step 3: Appointment
  • 24.3.4 Step 4: Submissions
  • 24.3.5 Step 5: The adjudicator
  • 24.4 Administration of the adjudication
  • 24.5 Determination, effect and costs
  • 24.5.1 Form and timing of the decision
  • 24.5.2 Effect of the decision
  • 24.5.3 Costs
  • 24.6 Enforcement
  • 24.6.1 Suspension or a reduction in the pace of work
  • 24.6.2 Secure direct payment from principal
  • 24.7 Conclusion
  • Chapter 25 New Zealand: Tómas Kennedy-Grant QC
  • 25.1 Overview
  • 25.2 Requirements for commencing an adjudication
  • 25.3 Adjudication process
  • 25.4 Determination, effect and costs
  • 25.4.1 Rights of a non-respondent owner
  • 25.5 Enforcement
  • 25.5.1 Judicial review
  • 25.6 Proposed amendments
  • Chapter 26 Singapore: Steven Cannon
  • 26.1 Overview
  • 26.2 Requirements for commencing an adjudication
  • 26.2.1 What contracts are caught by the 2004 Act?
  • 26.2.2 Contracting out, the date of execution of the contract and contracts made in writing
  • 26.3 Payment regime
  • 26.3.1 The right to progress payments
  • 26.3.2 The payment regime
  • 26.3.3 The crystallisation of a dispute and the dispute settlement period
  • 26.4 Adjudication process
  • 26.4.1 The role of the Singapore Mediation Centre
  • 26.4.2 Notice of an intention to adjudicate
  • 26.4.3 The adjudication application
  • 26.4.4 The role of the adjudicator
  • 26.5 Determination, effect and costs
  • 26.5.1 The adjudicators determination
  • 26.5.2 The costs of the adjudication
  • 26.5.3 Adjudication review applications
  • 26.5.4 The effect of an adjudicators determination
  • 26.6 Enforcement
  • 26.6.1 Enforcement of the adjudicators determination
  • 26.6.2 Setting aside the adjudicators determination
  • 26.7 Conclusion
  • Part 3 Appendices
  • Appendix 1 The 1996 Act as amended
  • 1.1 Introductory provisions
  • 104 Construction contracts
  • 105 Meaning of "construction operations"
  • 106 Provisions not applicable to contract with residential occupier
  • 106A Power to disapply provisions of this Part
  • 107 Provisions applicable only to agreements in writing
  • 107 Adjudication
  • 108. Right to refer disputes to adjudication
  • 108A Adjudication costs: effectiveness of provision
  • 108A Payment
  • 108A Supplementary provisions
  • 114 The Scheme for Construction Contracts
  • 115 Service of notices and communications
  • 116 Reckoning periods of time
  • 117 Crown application
  • 146 Orders, regulations and directions
  • Appendix 2 The 1998 Scheme as amended
  • The Scheme for Construction Contracts Part 1 - Adjudication
  • Appendix 3 Glossary (UK only)
  • 1.1 United Kingdom
  • 1.2 England and Wales
  • 1.3 Scotland
  • Appendix 4 Model forms
  • Appendix 5 Summary comparison of UK adjudication rules
  • Appendix 6 Details of UK adjudicator nominating bodies
  • Appendix 7 Comparison of UK and international statutory regimes
  • Appendix 8 Case index: by subject matter
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Background to statutory adjudication in the UK
  • 3 Deciding to adjudicate
  • 3.6 Adjudication on behalf of or against an insolvent party
  • 4 Statutory adjudication
  • 4.2 The existence and terms of a contract
  • 4.4 Construction Contract
  • 4.5 Construction operations
  • 4.6 Excluded construction operations
  • 4.7 Excluded agreements
  • 4.8 Contract in Writing
  • 5 Contractual and ad hoc adjudication
  • 5.1 Contractual adjudication
  • 5.2 Ad hoc adjudication
  • 6 Adjudication procedures
  • 6.2 Scheme
  • 6.3 Contractual procedures
  • 7 Preconditions and limits to a statutory adjudication
  • 7.2 Is there a dispute?
  • 7.3 More than one dispute
  • 7.4 Substantially the same dispute
  • 7.5 Does the dispute arise 'under' the contract (Act s. 108(1))
  • 7.6 More than one contract
  • 7.6.3 More than one contract (Scheme p. 8(2))
  • 7.7 Commencing an adjudication 'at any time'
  • 8 Adjudication strategy
  • 8.4 Choosing the right dispute to refer
  • 8.6 Assessing the other partys willingness and ability to pay
  • 9 Initiating the adjudication
  • 9.3 The notice of adjudication
  • 9.6 Appointing the adjudicator
  • 10. The adjudication
  • 10.2 The referral notice
  • 10.3 The response
  • 10.3.2 Timing
  • 10.6 Other matters
  • 10.7 Adjudicators powers and duties
  • 11 The decision
  • 11.2 What is the adjudicator required to do?
  • 11.3 On receiving the decision
  • 11.4 Timing
  • 11.5 The effect and compliance
  • 12 Post-decision
  • 12.2 Adjudicators costs (2009 Act, s.108A
  • Scheme, p. 25)
  • 12.3 Parties costs (2009 Act, s. 108A)
  • 12.5 Correcting errors in the decision (2009 Act, s. 108(3)(A)
  • 2011 Scheme, p. 22(A)
  • 1996 Act and 1998 Scheme)
  • 12.6 Setting off against the adjudicators decision
  • 13 Enforcement: options and procedure
  • 13.2 Key statements of principle and the courts policy
  • 13.3 TCC enforcement procedure
  • 13.4 Other procedures for enforcement
  • 13.5 Complying with an order of the court
  • 14 Enforcement: insolvency, stay and severability
  • 14.2 Insolvency avoids summary judgment
  • 14.3 Stay of execution
  • 14.4 Severability
  • 15 FINAL DETERMINATION
  • 15.2 Finalising the adjudicators decision
  • 15.3 Adjudication and Other Proceedings
  • 15.4 Commencement, onus of proof and costs
  • 16 The adjudicators jurisdiction
  • 16.3 Options when a jurisdictional issue arises
  • 16.4 Losing the right to challenge the adjudicators jurisdiction
  • 16.5 Threshold jurisdiction challenges
  • 16.6 Process jurisdiction challenges
  • 16.7 Decision based jurisdiction challenges
  • 17 Natural justice
  • 17.1 Overview
  • 17.3 Options when a natural justice point arises
  • 17.4 Bias and apparent bias
  • 17.5 Procedural fairness
  • 18 Further grounds for resisting enforcement
  • 18.2 Fraud or deceit
  • 18.3 Duress
  • 18.4 UTCCR
  • 17.5 HRA
  • Appendix 9 Alphabetical case index
  • Index
  • EULA

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.

Inhalt (PDF)

Download (sofort verfügbar)

78,00 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok