Developing Food Products for Consumers with Specific Dietary Needs

 
 
Woodhead Publishing
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 17. Mai 2016
  • |
  • 298 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100340-4 (ISBN)
 

Developing Food Products for Customers with Specific Dietary Needs explains the process for developing foods for customers who have specific dietary needs, further shining a light on the number of increasing medical conditions related to food intake that have emerged in the past few decades.

From increased fat and sugar intake leading to higher levels of obesity, to greater levels of coeliac disease, the ingredients and nutritional content of food is becoming more and more important. Additionally, consumers are following particular diets for many different reasons, be it health related, or for religious or moral reasons.

The first part of the book looks, in detail, at the organizational structure required within a company to allow for the development of food products which meet the needs of these customers, while the second part presents a number of case studies highlighting the development of food products for various dietary requirements.

Precise coverage includes section on the development of low-sodium, low-sugar, low-fat, and low-carbohydrate products with the aim of producing healthier foods, as well as the development of organic and vegetarian products for consumers who are following diets for personal reasons.

The potential solutions for developing foods for customers who have specific dietary needs are likely to include both ingredients and technology developments. The ingredients area includes simple reductions as well as replacement strategies, whilst technology will be applied to both the ingredient itself and the host food product. All are aimed at maintaining the product quality as perceived by the customer.


  • Provides an overview of the organizational structure required within a company to develop foods for specific customer needs
  • Includes section on the development of low-sodium, low-sugar, low-fat, and low-carbohydrate products with the aim of producing healthier foods
  • Presents case studies that deliver a best practice view on developing foods for customers with specific dietary needs
  • Written by industry professionals, this book offers in-depth coverage of this topic of ever increasing importance to the food industry
  • Englisch
  • Atlanta
Elsevier Science
  • 7,14 MB
978-0-08-100340-4 (9780081003404)
0081003404 (0081003404)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • Preface
  • Part One - Organization to allowfor development of foodsfor consumers with specificdietary needs
  • 1 - Differences between standard food product development and development of foods for consumers with specific dietary ...
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 1.1 - Product development process
  • 1.2 - Policies and procedures
  • 1.3 - Labeling of samples
  • 1.4 - HACCP
  • 1.5 - Compromise
  • 2 - People
  • 2.1 - Experience and expertise
  • 2.2 - Training
  • 2.3 - External experts and consultants
  • 3 - Ingredients
  • 3.1 - Suppliers
  • 3.2 - Handling and storage
  • 3.3 - Auditing
  • 4 - Facilities
  • 4.1 - Introduction
  • 4.2 - Development kitchen
  • 4.2.1 - Single facility for all products, "free-from" and standard
  • 4.2.2 - Single "free-from" facility
  • 4.2.3 - Single facility with dedicated "free-from" area
  • 4.3 - Pilot plant
  • 4.4 - Factory
  • 4.4.1 - Dedicated production lines
  • 4.4.2 - Time-separated production
  • 4.4.3 - Segregated production
  • 4.5 - Auditing
  • 4.6 - Codes of practice and policies
  • 5 - Testing
  • 5.1 - Introduction
  • 5.2 - Sensory and consumer testing
  • 5.3 - Physical testing
  • 5.4 - Chemical testing
  • 5.5 - Microbiological testing
  • 6 - Storage, stability, and shelf life
  • 6.1 - Introduction
  • 6.2 - Frozen products
  • 6.3 - Chilled products
  • 6.4 - Ambient products
  • 2 - Health beneficial consumer products-status and trends
  • 1 - The past-the era of functional foods
  • 1.1 - Market needs today
  • 1.2 - Consumer's interest for health
  • 1.3 - The industry approaches-successes and failures
  • 2 - Trends and their viability
  • 3 - Today-the nutritional and health claim trends or fads
  • 3.1 - The global consumer needs
  • 3.1.1 - Food and drink for the elderly
  • 3.1.2 - Raw foods-clear label-natural foods
  • 3.1.3 - Food and drinks to reduce disease risks
  • 3.1.4 - Optimizing breakfast and performance on the Go
  • 3.1.5 - Children's needs outside mealtime
  • 3.2 - Consumer's knowledge and health claims
  • 4 - Discovery, innovation, and category makers
  • 4.1 - Adaptogens
  • 4.2 - Cognitive support foods and drinks
  • 4.3 - Wholesome nutrition-seaweed
  • 4.4 - Functional joint drinks
  • 4.5 - Veggie and immune booster drinks
  • 4.6 - Men's health-specific needs
  • 5 - The future of our foods-transparent, natural, and convenient
  • 5.1 - Transparency and trust-exclusion diets
  • 5.2 - Personalized nutrition and supplements
  • 5.3 - Tribe consumers
  • References
  • 3 - Organizational structure and business and technology strategy of food companies to optimize development of foods fo...
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 1.1 - Dietary need versus dietary choice
  • 2 - Business vision and strategy
  • 3 - Innovation management
  • 4 - Focus on: product and process innovation
  • 4.1 - Product development processes
  • 4.2 - A management framework for NPD-"doing the right things"
  • 4.3 - The technology roadmap-a suggested management framework for NPD
  • 4.4 - Creating and living with a technology roadmap
  • 4.4.1 - Get the right people together
  • 4.4.2 - Define the current state and possible future states
  • 4.4.3 - How are we going to get there?
  • 5 - Focus on: marketing innovation
  • 5.1 - Case study-QuornT
  • 6 - Focus on: organizational innovation-organizational structure and development
  • 6.1 - Senior management buy-in
  • 6.2 - Cross-functional working
  • 6.3 - Training
  • 7 - Considerations for a robust new product development process
  • 7.1 - Project management-linear organic versus agile
  • 7.2 - KPIs, scorecards, and measuring partnership health
  • 7.3 - Innovation and sustainability-lifecycle analysis and eco innovation
  • 7.4 - Appropriability regime
  • 8 - Supply chain management
  • 9 - Technical management
  • 9.1 - Supplier management
  • 9.2 - Risk assessment
  • 9.3 - Legislation and labeling
  • 9.4 - Certification
  • 9.5 - Crisis management
  • 9.6 - Case study: dairy-free chocolate bar case study
  • 10 - Future trends/conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • 4 - Commercialization of foods for customers with specific dietary needs
  • 1 - Ingredient selection
  • 2 - Communication
  • Product development
  • Part Two - Case studies in developingfoods for consumers withspecific dietary needs
  • 5 - Developing food products for consumers with low sodium/salt requirements
  • 1 - The relationship between salt and sodium
  • 2 - Sodium and dietary intake
  • 3 - Sodium and processed food targets
  • 4 - Sodium and consumer information
  • 4.1 - Consumer information-new initiatives
  • 5 - Sodium and reformulation challenges
  • 6 - Taste and flavor
  • 6.1 - Reducing salt by stealth
  • 6.2 - Modifying taste perception
  • 6.3 - Taste enhancers
  • 6.4 - Multisensory approach
  • 6.5 - Changing food matrix
  • 6.6 - Minerals
  • 7 - Preservation
  • 7.1 - Alternative chloride salts
  • 8 - Function-maintaining texture
  • 9 - How to approach reformulation
  • 9.1 - Decision process
  • 10 - Conclusion and future trends
  • Further reading: practical strategies, commercial salt replacers, and case studies
  • References
  • 6 - Developing food products for customers with low fat and low saturated fat requirements: dairy and meat products
  • 1 Health and nutritional effects of fat in the diet
  • 1.1 Types of fats
  • 1.2 Calorie content
  • 1.3 Cardiovascular disease risk
  • 2 Health and nutritional effects of saturated fat in the diet
  • 3 Dairy products with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 3.1 Composition of milk fat
  • 3.2 Modifying the level of saturates in milk fat
  • 3.3 Milk
  • 3.4 Butter, margarines, and spreads
  • 3.5 Cheese
  • 3.6 Yogurts
  • 4 Meat products with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 4.1 Fatty acid composition of meats from different animals
  • 4.2 Effect of cut of meat on fatty acid composition
  • 4.3 Effect of diet on fatty acid composition
  • 4.4 Effect of improved butchery methods on total fat content
  • 4.5 Processed meats (sausages and burgers)
  • 5 Future developments
  • 5.1 Dairy
  • 5.2 Meat
  • References
  • Further reading
  • 7 - Developing food products for customers with lowfat and low saturated fat requirements: processed foods
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Bakery products with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 2.1 - Fats used in bakery products
  • 2.2 - Pastry
  • 2.3 - Biscuits
  • 2.4 - Cakes
  • 2.5 - Bread
  • 3 - Confectionery products with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 3.1 - Requirements of fats used in confectionery products
  • 3.2 - Reduction of total fat and saturates in chocolate and compound coatings
  • 3.3 - Reductions of total fat and saturates in confectionery fillings
  • 4 - Snack products with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 4.1 - Reducing oil uptake during frying
  • 4.2 - Reducing saturated fat content of fried snacks
  • 5 - Ice cream with low total fat and/or low saturated fat
  • 6 - Future developments
  • 6.1 - Bakery
  • 6.2 - Confectionery
  • 6.3 - Snacks
  • 6.4 - Ice cream
  • Further reading
  • References
  • 8 - Developing food products for customers following a low sugar diet, including low sucrose, low fructose, and low lac...
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - The multiple functions of sugars in product development
  • 3 - Consideration in formulating foods for low sucrose diets
  • 3.1 - Flavor
  • 3.2 - Color
  • 3.3 - Texture
  • 3.4 - Preservation
  • 3.5 - Freezing point depression
  • 4 - Low fructose diets
  • 4.1 - Considerations in formulating low fructose foods
  • 5 - Low lactose diets
  • 6 - Alternatives to sucrose, fructose, and lactose
  • 6.1 - Sweeteners
  • 6.1.1 - High intensity sweeteners
  • 6.1.2 - Bulk sweeteners: polyols
  • 6.1.3 - Other bulk sweeteners
  • 6.2 - Preservatives
  • 7 - Technological solutions
  • 8 - Future trends/conclusion
  • References
  • 9 - Developing food products, which help consumers to lower their cholesterol level
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 1.1 - What is cholesterol and what is a healthy level?
  • 1.2 - Cholesterol and heart health
  • 1.3 - How diet can affect cholesterol level and heart health
  • 2 - Key nutrition factors to consider when developing cholesterol lowering products
  • 2.1 - Saturated fats and Trans fats
  • 2.2 - Polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fats
  • 2.3 - Calorie intake
  • 2.4 - Cholesterol intake
  • 2.5 - Folate, B6, and B12
  • 2.6 - Fish oil/Omega-3
  • 2.7 - Dietary fiber
  • 2.8 - Sodium, potassium, and calcium
  • 3 - Food ingredients for formulating foods for consumers who wish to lower their cholesterol level
  • 3.1 - Soy protein
  • 3.2 - Oats
  • 3.3 - Plant sterols and stanols
  • 3.4 - Fish/fish oil
  • 3.5 - Nuts
  • 3.6 - Guar gum
  • 3.7 - Pectin
  • 3.8 - Chitosan
  • 4 - Developing food products which help lower cholesterol levels
  • 4.1 - Consumer issues to consider
  • 4.2 - Regulatory and claims issues to consider
  • 4.2.1 - Japan and China
  • 4.2.2 - USA
  • 4.2.3 - Europe
  • 5 - Examples of food products which are marketed for cholesterol lowering
  • 6 - Future trends and opportunities
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 10 - Developing food products for consumers on a gluten-free diet
  • 1 - Coeliac disease and the gluten-free sector
  • 2 - The gluten-free label
  • 3 - Why it is challenging to produce gluten-free
  • 4 - Formulation of gluten-free products
  • 4.1 - Ingredients used in gluten-free formulations
  • 4.2 - Developing gluten-free breads
  • 4.3 - Other gluten-free products
  • 4.3.1 - Gluten-free pasta
  • 4.3.2 - Gluten-free biscuits and cakes
  • 4.3.3 - Gluten-free beer and other beverages
  • 4.4 - Nutritional improvement of gluten-free products
  • 5 - Quality assurance in the factory
  • 6 - Conclusion and future trends
  • References
  • 11 - Developing food products for consumers concerned with physical activity, sports, and fitness
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - The consumer
  • 3 - Training, recovery, and nutrition-Will Beauchamp
  • 3.1 - Training strategy
  • 3.1.1 - Interval training
  • 3.1.2 - Tempo run
  • 3.1.3 - Recovery runs
  • 3.1.4 - Strength and conditioning
  • 3.1.5 - Technique and balance
  • 3.1.6 - Crosstraining
  • 3.2 - Heart rate training
  • 3.3 - Recovery
  • 3.4 - Nutrition strategy
  • 4 - Training, recovery, and nutrition: Karla Drew-athletics
  • 4.1 - Typical training week
  • 4.2 - Recovery
  • 5 - Before, during, after ..
  • 6 - Why?
  • 7 - What
  • 7.1 - Protein
  • 8 - When
  • 9 - With what
  • 10 - How much
  • 11 - How
  • 11.1 - Carbohydrates
  • 11.2 - The role of carbohydrates/sugars
  • 11.3 - Sweeteners
  • 11.4 - EFSA
  • 11.5 - Vitamins
  • 11.6 - Vitamin D
  • 11.7 - Minerals
  • 11.8 - Calcium
  • 12 - Fats and fiber
  • 12.1 - Hydration
  • 13 - Considerations of ingredients for use in sports nutrition
  • 13.1 - Tart cherry juice
  • 13.2 - Blackcurrant
  • 13.3 - Beetroot juice
  • 13.4 - Tea
  • 13.5 - Turmeric
  • 13.6 - Omega-3 containing foods/supplements
  • 13.7 - Probiotics
  • 13.8 - Resveratrol
  • 14 - Commercial and practical considerations
  • 15 - Conclusion
  • References
  • 12 - Developing organic, fairtrade, and ethically produced products
  • 1 - An introduction to ethical foods
  • 1.1 - Historical perspectives
  • 1.2 - Defining ethical and organic foods
  • 1.3 - State of the market
  • 1.4 - Trends and drivers
  • 2 - Understanding the ethical consumer
  • 2.1 - Understanding perceptions and motivations
  • 2.2 - The purchase decision
  • 2.3 - Consumer segmentation
  • 3 - Ethical and organic certifications and standards
  • 3.1 - Certifiers and verifiers
  • 3.2 - Why certify?
  • 3.3 - Regulatory overview
  • 3.3.1 - Organic
  • 3.3.2 - Fairtrade
  • 3.3.3 - Rainforest Alliance
  • 3.3.4 - UTZ
  • 3.3.5 - Marine Stewardship Council
  • 3.3.6 - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)
  • 3.4 - Certification overload?
  • 4 - Ethical products in focus
  • 4.1 - Product differentiation
  • 4.2 - Ethical supply chains and new product development
  • 5 - Questioning the ethics of ethical products
  • 5.1 - Ethical conflicts in sourcing and production
  • 5.2 - Ethics versus nutrition?
  • 6 - Future trends and perspectives
  • 6.1 - The sustainable mainstream
  • 6.2 - Simplifying sustainability
  • 6.3 - Mildly sustainable: a halfway house?
  • References
  • Index
  • Back cover

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