Smart Cities and Homes

Key Enabling Technologies
 
 
Morgan Kaufmann (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 17. Mai 2016
  • |
  • 452 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-803463-7 (ISBN)
 

Smart Cities and Homes: Key Enabling Technologies explores the fundamental principles and concepts of the key enabling technologies for smart cities and homes, disseminating the latest research and development efforts in the field utilizing numerous case studies and examples throughout.

Smart cities use digital technologies embedded across all its functions to enhance the wellbeing of its citizens. Cities that utilize these technologies report enhancements in power efficiency, water use, traffic congestion, environment protection, pollution reduction, senior citizens care, public safety and security, literacy rate, and more.

Smart Cities and Homes: Key Enabling Technologies brings together the most important breakthroughs and recent advances in a coherent fashion, highlighting the interconnections between the works in different areas of computing. The book explores new and emerging computer networking systems and other computing technologies such as wireless sensor networks, vehicle ad hoc networks, smart girds, cloud computing and data analytics and their roles in creating environmentally friendly, secure, and prosperous cities and homes.

Intended for researchers and practitioners, Smart Cities and Homes: Key Enabling Technologies discusses the pervasive and cooperative computing technologies that will perform a central role for handling the challenges of urbanization and demographic change.


  • Case studies and contributions from prominent researchers and practitioners from around the globe
  • Explores the latest methodologies, theories, tools, applications, trends, challenges, and strategies needed to build a smart cities and home from the bottom up
  • Pedagogy such as PowerPoint slides, key terms, and a comprehensive bibliography


Petros Nicopolitidis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Informatics at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,located in Thessaloniki, Greece.
  • Englisch
  • San Francisco
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 25,34 MB
978-0-12-803463-7 (9780128034637)
0128034637 (0128034637)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedicated
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • About the Editors
  • Preface
  • Overview and goals
  • Organization and features
  • Target audience
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction and overview of key enabling technologies for smart cities and homes
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Trends in smart cities and homes
  • 2.1 - Smart cities
  • 2.1.1 - Smart mobility and smart traffic management
  • 2.1.2 - Smart environment
  • 2.1.3 - Smart living
  • 2.1.4 - Smart economy
  • 2.1.5 - Smart governance
  • 2.1.6 - Smart people
  • 2.2 - Smart homes
  • 2.2.1 - Programmable and zone-based smart thermostat
  • 2.2.2 - Wireless power
  • 2.2.3 - Automatic door locks
  • 2.2.4 - Advanced security system
  • 3 - Challenges in smart cities and homes
  • 3.1 - Security
  • 3.2 - IoT challenges
  • 3.3 - Fragmentation of standards
  • 3.4 - Processing big data
  • 3.5 - Scalability
  • 4 - Survey of major key enabling technologies for smart cities and homes
  • 4.1 - Internet of things
  • 4.2 - Smart dust
  • 4.3 - Smartphones
  • 4.4 - Cloud computing
  • 4.5 - Big data and open data
  • 4.6 - Smart grid
  • 5 - Examples
  • 5.1 - Smart home devices
  • 5.1.1 - Nest thermostat
  • 5.1.2 - Honeywell Lyric thermostat
  • 5.1.3 - Canary
  • 5.1.4 - Goji
  • 5.1.5 - Aggregate smart home device controllers
  • 5.2 - Smart city projects
  • 5.2.1 - Amsterdam smart city
  • 5.2.2 - Smart city Barcelona
  • 5.2.3 - Smart city Birmingham
  • 5.2.4 - Smart city Wien (Vienna)
  • 6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 2 - Wireless sensor networks applications to smart homes and cities
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - WSN applications examples
  • 2.1 - Energy-saving applications
  • 2.2 - Noise and atmospheric monitoring
  • 2.3 - Healthcare monitoring
  • 3 - Access technologies
  • 3.1 - First access technologies architecture
  • 3.2 - Second access technologies architecture
  • 3.3 - Third access technologies architecture
  • 4 - Routing strategies
  • 5 - Power-saving methods
  • 6 - Security
  • 7 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Software defined things: a green network management for future smart city architectures
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Smart city data plane challenges
  • 2.1 - Compatibility between smart city devices
  • 2.2 - Simplicity
  • 2.3 - Mobility and geographic control
  • 3 - Software defined network-based smart city network management
  • 3.1 - Centralized control
  • 3.2 - Simplicity and inerrability
  • 3.3 - Virtualization
  • 3.4 - Compatibility
  • 3.5 - Challenges of SDN in smart city applications
  • 4 - Software defined things framework
  • 4.1 - Reactive smart city device management
  • 4.1.1 - The number of necessary devices
  • 4.1.2 - Software defined reactive devices
  • 4.1.3 - Conflict parameter calculation
  • 4.1.4 - Spatial correlation coefficient calculation
  • 4.2 - Self-organization algorithm
  • 5 - Conclusions and future research
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - Nomadic service discovery in smart cities
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Related work
  • 2.1 - Background and terminology
  • 2.2 - Related work
  • 2.2.1 - General-purpose SD protocols
  • 2.2.2 - SD protocols for LLNs
  • 2.2.3 - SD frameworks and architectures for the IoT
  • 2.2.4 - Summary: solutions for the IoT
  • 3 - mDNS/DNS-SD service discovery
  • 3.1 - Operational modes
  • 3.2 - Strategies for responding to queries
  • 3.2.1 - Multicast versus unicast responses
  • 3.2.2 - Short versus complete responses
  • 3.3 - Problems in mDNS/DNS-SD for IoT
  • 4 - Proxy support for sleeping nodes
  • 4.1 - Active proxy delegation protocol
  • 4.2 - Passive proxy delegation protocol
  • 4.3 - Reliability
  • 4.4 - Evaluation
  • 4.4.1 - Memory footprint
  • 4.4.2 - Empirical evaluation
  • 4.4.3 - Simulation
  • 4.4.4 - Summary
  • 5 - Support for context queries
  • 5.1 - Context tag descriptors
  • 5.1.1 - Predicates as selection criteria
  • 5.1.2 - Comparison
  • 6 - Future work: packet size
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - A survey on enabling wireless local area network technologies for smart cities
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Development of IEEE 802.11
  • 2.1 - Protocol stack
  • 2.2 - Frequency bands
  • 2.2.1 - ISM band
  • 2.2.2 - U-NII band
  • 2.3 - Physical layer
  • 2.4 - Medium access control layer
  • 2.5 - IEEE 802.11 family and derived amendments
  • 2.5.1 - IEEE 802.11g
  • 2.5.2 - IEEE 802.11e
  • 2.5.3 - IEEE 802.11d
  • 2.5.4 - IEEE 802.11f
  • 2.5.5 - IEEE 802.11h
  • 2.5.6 - IEEE 802.11i
  • 2.5.7 - IEEE 802.11k
  • 2.5.8 - IEEE 802.11j
  • 2.5.9 - IEEE 802.11p
  • 2.5.10 - IEEE 802.11u
  • 2.5.11 - IEEE 802.11v
  • 2.5.12 - IEEE 802.11r
  • 2.5.13 - IEEE 802.11s
  • 2.5.14 - IEEE 802.11w
  • 2.5.15 - IEEE 802.11n
  • 3 - Smart city solutions
  • 3.1 - Smart cities based on WLAN use cases
  • 3.1.1 - Smart sensors and meters
  • 3.1.2 - Extended-range hotspot
  • 3.1.3 - Backhaul aggregation
  • 3.2 - Enabling WLAN technologies for smart cities
  • 3.2.1 - IEEE 802.11ad
  • 3.2.2 - IEEE 802.11ae
  • 3.2.3 - IEEE 802.11ac
  • 3.2.4 - IEEE 802.11ah
  • 3.2.5 - IEEE 802.11af
  • 3.3 - Examples of smart city services and applications
  • 4 - Requirements
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - LTE and 5G systems
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Cellular network evolution
  • 2.1 - Overview on the third generation
  • 2.1.1 - UMTS
  • 2.1.2 HSPA+
  • 2.2 4G wireless network
  • 2.2.1 - 4G: 3GPPP LTE
  • 2.2.2 - 5G: LTE-Advanced
  • 3 - Handover management
  • 3.1 - Handover steps
  • 3.1.1 - Cells and networks discovery
  • 3.1.2 - Handover decision and network decision
  • 3.1.3 - Handover execution
  • 3.2 - Handover delay
  • 4 - Empirical case: smart cities
  • 4.1 - Concept characterization
  • 4.2 - Current and future challenges
  • 4.3 - Internet of things
  • 4.4 - Mobility integration
  • 5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Cars as a main ICT resource of smart cities
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Related work
  • 3 - The Car4ICT concept
  • 3.1 - Use cases
  • 3.2 - Basic architecture
  • 3.3 - Service and neighbor tables
  • 4 - Simulative performance evaluation
  • 5 - Simulation study
  • 6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 8 - From vehicular networks to vehicular clouds in smart cities
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Vanet architecture
  • 2.1 - VANET protocol architecture
  • 2.2 - VANET applications
  • 3 - Vehicular cloud infrastructure
  • 4 - VANET challenges and solutions in smart cities
  • 4.1 - Smart driving
  • 4.2 - Safety challenges
  • 4.3 - Management challenges and clustering solutions
  • 4.4 - Emergency and disaster recovery
  • 5 - Vehicular clouds challenges and solutions in smart cities
  • 5.1 - Security in vehicular clouds
  • 5.2 - Privacy and user experience in vehicular clouds
  • 5.3 - Virtualization-based challenges
  • 5.4 - Context-awareness
  • 6 - Open issues and future directions in vehicular smart city systems
  • 7 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Smart home cybersecurity considering the integration of renewable energy
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Preliminaries
  • 2.1 - Energy consumption
  • 2.2 - Net metering
  • 2.3 - Monetary cost
  • 3 - Energy load prediction considering net metering
  • 3.1 - Game formulation considering net metering
  • 3.2 - Problem solving
  • 4 - Impact of net metering to pricing cyberattack detection
  • 4.1 - SVR-based single event detection
  • 4.2 - POMDP-based long-term detection
  • 5 - Simulation results
  • 6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10 - Smart home scheduling and cybersecurity: fundamentals
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Smart home system preliminaries
  • 2.1 - Smart home system model
  • 2.2 - Smart home scheduling
  • 3 - Pricing cyberattacks
  • 3.1 - Cyberattack for bill reduction
  • 3.2 - Cyberattack for forming the peak energy load
  • 4 - Single event detection technology
  • 5 - Long-term detection technique
  • 5.1 - Motivation
  • 5.2 - Our POMDP-based detection
  • 6 - Case study for long-term detection technique
  • 7 - Simulation
  • 7.1 - Cyberattack for bill reduction
  • 7.2 - Cyberattack for forming a peak energy load
  • 7.3 - Single event detection technique
  • 7.4 - Long-term detection technique
  • 8 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Advanced optical network architecture for the next generation internet access
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 1.1 - Convergence to the digital communication age
  • 1.2 - Introducing the PANDA architecture
  • 1.3 - Increasing performance with traffic aggregation and prediction
  • 2 - PANDA architecture
  • 2.1 - VDSL enduser access
  • 2.2 - Multiwavelength passive optical network
  • 2.3 - The MAC layer
  • 2.4 - Lines rates and poplation coverage
  • 2.5 - Extensions
  • 2.6 - Scalability study
  • 2.7 - Geographical study
  • 3 - Aggregation and prediction of traffic
  • 3.1 - Introduction
  • 3.2 - Traffic analysis and prediction
  • 3.3 - Traffic aggregation strategies
  • 4 - DBA simulation and results
  • 4.1 - PANDA DBA structure
  • 4.2 - Proposed FIBO DBA algorithm
  • 5 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 12 - Cloud computing systems for smart cities and homes
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Cloud computing fundamentals
  • 2.1 - Cloud computing offerings
  • 2.1.1 - SaaS: Software as a Service
  • 2.1.2 - PaaS: Platform as a Service
  • 2.1.3 - IaaS: Infrastructure as a Service
  • 2.2 - Characteristics of cloud computing architecture
  • 2.3 - Cloud computing models
  • 2.4 - Cloud computing security
  • 2.4.1 - Effectively manage identities
  • 2.5 - Key concerns about cloud computing
  • 2.6 - Major industry players
  • 3 - Cloud computing applications
  • 3.1 - Big Data as an enabling technology for Smart homes and cities
  • 3.1.1 - Big data, data fusion, and data analytics
  • 3.1.2 - Trends in big data as an enabling technology
  • 3.2 - Smart cities
  • 3.2.1 - Smart city concept
  • 3.2.2 - Smarter grid
  • 3.3 - Smart home
  • 3.3.1 - Concept
  • 3.3.2 - Smart homes enabled by the cloud
  • 3.3.3 - Home cloud service delivery platform
  • 3.3.4 - Emerging protocols for smart homes
  • 4 - Case study: Seoul smart city
  • 4.1 - Presentation
  • 4.2 - Cloud based ICT infrastructure
  • 4.3 - Data and service delivery
  • 4.4 - Open Application Programming Interface (API) and Open Data
  • 4.5 - PaaS mobile application data access
  • 5 - Summary and concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 13 - Design and management of vehicle-sharing systems: a survey of algorithmic approaches
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Challenges and objectives in the design of vehicle-sharing systems
  • 3 - Models and algorithmic approaches for optimizing vehicle sharing systems
  • 3.1 - Algorithmic approaches on the strategic design of vehicle-sharing systems
  • 3.2 - Tactical incentives for bicycles/cars distribution
  • 3.3 - Operational repositioning of bicycles/cars
  • 4 - Algorithms for ride sharing
  • 5 - Research challenges and future prospects
  • 6 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 14 - Smart transportation systems (STSs) in critical conditions
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Smart transportation systems
  • 2.1 - Users and main applications in an STS
  • 2.2 - STS in critical conditions
  • 2.3 - Security aspects in STS
  • 3 - Network design for smart transportation systems in critical conditions
  • 3.1 - The limits of current network technologies to support STS
  • 3.2 - Toward a new network architecture
  • 4 - Software-defined networking
  • 4.1 - Brief history
  • 4.1.1 - Active networking
  • 4.1.2 - Separating control and data planes
  • 4.2 - Why did it not work out?
  • 4.3 - Theoretical aspects
  • 4.4 - SDN in practice
  • 4.4.1 - Implementation aspects: forwarding model
  • 4.4.2 - Implementation aspects: controller
  • 5 - QoS applications for STS
  • 5.1 - STS scenario
  • 6 - Incremental deployment of STS-SDN solution
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15 - Optimization classification and techniques of WSNs in smart grid
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Optimization primer
  • 3 - Types of objectives and optimization techniques in smart grid paradigm
  • 4 - Constraints considered while formulating optimization problems in smart grid paradigm
  • 5 - Optimization solution types and related simulation tools in smart grid paradigm
  • 6 - Conclusions and discussions
  • References
  • Chapter 16 - Docit: an integrated system for risk-averse multimodal journey advising
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - The power of uncertainty-aware plans
  • 3 - System overview
  • 4 - Aggregating network data
  • 4.1 - Data format
  • 5 - The policies
  • 6 - Integration with IBM IIT and IBM IOC
  • 6.1 - IBM intelligent transportation
  • 6.2 - IBM Intelligent Operations Center
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • Glossary
  • References
  • Chapter 17 - Smart restaurants: survey on customer demand and sales forecasting
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Revenue management
  • 3 - Literature review
  • 3.1 - Multiple regression
  • 3.2 - Poisson regression
  • 3.3 - Box-Jenkins models (ARIMA)
  • 3.4 - Exponential smoothing and Holt-Winters models
  • 3.5 - Artificial neural networks
  • 3.6 - Bayesian network model
  • 3.7 - Hybrid models
  • 3.8 - Association rules (market basket analysis)
  • 4 - Discussion of methods and data mining algorithms
  • 5 - Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index
  • Back Cover

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