Advances in the Study of Behavior

 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 19. April 2020
  • |
  • 302 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-820726-0 (ISBN)
 

Advances in the Study of Behavior, Volume 52, provides users with the latest insights in this ever-evolving field. Users will find new information on a variety of species, including ecological determinants of sex roles and female sexual selection, copulatory behavior and genital morphology in vertebrates, proximate and ultimate influences on social behavior, and more. Sample chapters in this release include Ecological determinants of sex roles and female sexual selection, Sensory information in social insects, How the material basis of colors impacts how they evolve, participate in behavioral interactions, and interface with other life history characters, Fiddler crabs, the Evolution of female coloration, and more.

  • Serves the increasing number of scientists engaged in the study of animal behavior
  • Makes another important contribution to the development of the field
  • Presents theoretical ideas and research to those studying animal behavior and related fields
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 13,52 MB
978-0-12-820726-0 (9780128207260)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Intro
  • Advances in the Study of Behavior
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Reference
  • Chapter One: Ecological determinants of sex roles and female sexual selection
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Kawanaphila nartee as a model system in sex role research
  • 2.1. Early research on buschcrickets hinted at ecological factors underlying sex role reversal
  • 2.2. OSR affects the sex roles adopted by males and females in K. nartee
  • 2.3. Evolutionary consequences of plastic sex role reversal
  • 2.4. Sexual selection on females
  • 3. Ramifications of Kawanaphila research and future directions
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Authors´ contributions
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Integrating nutritional and behavioral ecology: Mutual benefits and new frontiers
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The multivariate nature of nutrition
  • 3. An integrative approach to nutritional ecology and behavioral ecology
  • 4. Integrating nutritional ecology and behavioral ecology to better understand reproduction
  • 4.1. Female reproduction
  • 4.2. Male reproduction
  • 4.3. Sexual conflict
  • 5. Conclusions and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Copulatory behavior and its relationship to genital morphology
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Copulatory behavior: Some general patterns
  • 3. The overlapping functions of copulation and genitalia
  • 3.1. Transfer and removal of sperm
  • 3.2. Copulatory damage to prevent quick remating or to introduce male seminal fluid proteins into the female
  • 3.3. Copulatory and/or genital courtship to induce sperm storage or sperm use by females
  • 3.4. Copulation to induce ovulation in mammals
  • 4. Diversity of copulatory behavior and genitalia in selected amniotes
  • 4.1. Squamates
  • 4.2. Turtles
  • 4.3. Crocodiles
  • 4.4. Birds
  • 4.5. Mammals
  • 4.5.1. Rodents
  • 4.5.2. Felids
  • 4.5.3. Canids
  • 4.5.4. Domesticated livestock
  • 4.5.5. Cetaceans
  • 4.5.6. Primates
  • 5. Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • Appendix. A list of You Tube videos illustrating mating behavior in selected amniotes
  • References
  • Suggested reading
  • Chapter Four: Evolution of female coloration: What have we learned from birds in general and blue tits in particular
  • 1. Introduction-Female ornaments: A paradigm shift
  • 2. Aim of this review
  • 3. Macroevolution of female coloration-Insights from comparative studies
  • 3.1. Summary
  • 4. Microevolution-Insights from long-term studies
  • 4.1. Progress in quantifying the strength of sexual selection on coloration in female birds
  • 4.2. Progress in quantifying the strength of social selection on female coloration in birds
  • 4.3. Progress in quantifying the strength of natural selection on female coloration in birds
  • 4.4. Summary
  • 5. Signaling content of female coloration traits in birds
  • 5.1. Cost as a constraint on the evolution of female coloration?
  • 5.2. Benefits of male mate choice
  • 5.2.1. A direct benefit exclusive to female ornaments: Enhanced fecundity
  • 5.2.2. An important direct benefit linked to female reproductive capacity: Stress resistance
  • 5.2.3. A direct benefit exclusive to female ornaments: The advantages associated with maternal effects
  • 5.3. Female-female competition and female coloration
  • 5.3.1. Experimental evidence for badges of status in birds
  • 5.3.2. Is there a specific coloration type associated with badges of status and, if so, why?
  • 5.3.3. Physiological mechanisms underlying female aggressiveness
  • 5.4. Summary
  • 6. The blue tit as a model study system
  • 6.1. Summary
  • 7. General conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Variation, plasticity, and alternative mating tactics: Revisiting what we know about the socially monogamou ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Mating systems
  • 2.1. Mating system evolution: Social, spatial, and ecological demands
  • 2.2. Variation and flexibility in mating systems
  • 3. Comparing mating systems among vole species
  • 3.1. Reproductive ecology of prairie voles and meadow voles
  • 3.2. Studying monogamous behaviors in laboratory settings
  • 3.3. Variation in monogamous behaviors in field settings
  • 4. Alternative mating tactics in prairie voles
  • 4.1. A tale of two tactics: Residents and wanderers
  • 4.2. Neurobiological differences underlying laboratory measures of monogamy
  • 4.3. Neurobiological differences underlying field-based measures of monogamy
  • 5. Mating tactics respond to social, ecological, and spatial contexts
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Can´t see the ``hood´´ for the trees: Can avian cooperative breeding currently be understood using the phylo ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Some problems with definitions
  • 2.1. What is ``not cooperative breeding´´?
  • 2.2. Dealing with variation
  • 3. Patterns in cooperative breeding
  • 3.1. Phylogenetic pattern
  • 3.2. Biogeographic patterns
  • 4. Phylogenetic comparative method (PCM) studies of cooperative breeding
  • 4.1. Slow life histories: Arnold and Owens (1998)
  • 4.2. Defense against brood parasites: Feeney et al. (2013)
  • 4.3. Fidelity facilitates kin selection: Cornwallis, West, Davis, and Griffin (2010)
  • 4.4. Though long lifespan can be more important: Downing, Cornwallis, and Griffin (2015)
  • 4.5. Habitat variability: Jetz and Rubenstein (2011)
  • 4.6. Family life and habitat deterioration: Griesser, Drobniak, Nakagawa, and Botero (2017)
  • 4.7. Habitat saturation: What is it, and why has it not attracted PCM analysis?
  • 5. Conclusions and the way forward
  • Acknowledgments
  • References

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

130,90 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen