Essential Plant Nutrients

Uptake, Use Efficiency, and Management
 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 7. August 2017
  • |
  • XVI, 569 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-319-58841-4 (ISBN)
 
This book explores the agricultural, commercial, and ecological future of plants in relation to mineral nutrition. It covers various topics regarding the role and importance of mineral nutrition in plants including essentiality, availability, applications, as well as their management and control strategies. Plants and plant products are increasingly important sources for the production of energy, biofuels, and biopolymers in order to replace the use of fossil fuels. The maximum genetic potential of plants can be realized successfully with a balanced mineral nutrients supply. This book explores efficient nutrient management strategies that tackle the over and under use of nutrients, check different kinds of losses from the system, and improve use efficiency of the plants. Applied and basic aspects of ecophysiology, biochemistry, and biotechnology have been adequately incorporated including pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals, agronomical, breeding and plant protection parameters, propagation and nutrients managements. This book will serve not only as an excellent reference material but also as a practical guide for readers, cultivators, students, botanists, entrepreneurs, and farmers.
1st ed. 2017
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • 23
  • |
  • 29 farbige Abbildungen, 23 s/w Abbildungen
  • |
  • 23 schwarz-weiße und 29 farbige Abbildungen, Bibliographie
  • 10,18 MB
978-3-319-58841-4 (9783319588414)
10.1007/978-3-319-58841-4
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Dr. M. Naeem Dr. M. Naeem is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Botany at Aligarh Muslim University, India. For more than a decade, he has devoted his research to improving the yield and quality of commercially important medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs). His research focuses on escalating the production of MAPs and their active principles using a novel and safe technique involving radiation-processed polysaccharides as well as the application of potent PGRs. To date, he has successfully run three major research projects as the Principal Investigator, two of which were sanctioned by the Department of Science & Technology, New Delhi. He also completed another fascinating research project on Catharanthus roseus awarded by CSTUP, Lucknow. Dr. Naeem has published more than 80 research papers in reputable national and international journals as well as six books. He has also participated in various national and international conferences and acquired life memberships to various scientific bodies in India and abroad. Based on his research contributions, Dr. Naeem has been awarded a Research Associateship from the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, New Delhi; a Young Scientist Award (2011) from the State Government of Uttar Pradesh; a Fast Track Young Scientist Award from the Department of Science & Technology, India; a Young Scientist of the Year Award (2015) from the Scientific and Environmental Research Institute, Kolkata; and a Rashtriya Gaurav Award (2016) from the International Friendship Society, New Delhi.Dr. Abid A. Ansari Dr. Abid A. Ansari is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. Dr. Ansari's research work is concerned with phytoremediation and eutrophication. Dr. Ansari has to his credit a number of research articles of national and international repute, 10 edited books and a number of book chapters on varied aspects of his research. He has been awarded Scientist of the Year 2014 & Environmentalist of the Year 2011 by National Environmental Science Academy, India and Research Excellence 2016 by University of Tabuk. He has also participated in various national and international conferences and acquired memberships to various scientific bodies (Saudi Biological Society, International Phytotechnology Society, Society for Ecological Restoration).Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill Sarvajeet Singh Gill, Assistant Professor at Centre for Biotechnology, MD University, Rohtak, India, has made significant contributions towards abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. His research includes abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants, reactive oxygen species signaling and antioxidant machinery, gene expression, helicases, crop improvement, transgenics, nitrogen & sulfur metabolism and plant fungal symbiotic interactions. Together with Dr. Narendra Tuteja at International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), New Delhi, he worked on plant helicases and discovered a novel function of plant MCM6, PDH45 and p68 in salinity stress tolerance that will help improve crop production at sub-optimal conditions. A recipient of the Junior Scientist of the Year Award 2008 from the National Environmental Science Academy, Dr. Gill has edited several books and has a number of research papers, review articles, and book chapters to his name.
Section I: Concepts of Plant Nutrients Uptake
1. Essential Plant Nutrients and Recent Concepts about their Uptake2. Status and Importance of Nutrients for Plant Growth & Development-Role of essential and beneficial nutrients in plant growth and development3. Nutrient deficiency: its impact on crop productivity4. Quantitative Attributes of Nutrient Uptake and Use Efficiency5. Biochar as soil amendment for essential plant nutrient uptake
Section II: Plant Nutrients Use Efficiency6. Nutrient use efficiency
7. Understanding the Dynamics of Phosphorus Starvation and Plant Growth
8. Response pattern of selected tropical perennials to organic and inorganic fertilizers based on empirical data
9. Unraveling the Impact of Essential Mineral Nutrients on Active Constituents of Selected Medicinal and Aromatic Plants

Section III: Plant Nutrition and Abiotic Stress10. Actions of biological trace elements in plant abiotic stress tolerance
11. Regulatory Role of Mineral Nutrients and PGRs in Nurturing of Medicinal Legumes under Salt Stress
12. Role of Iron in Alleviating Heavy Metal Stress
13. Calcium Applications Enhances Plant Salt Tolerance: A Review
14. Short-term transformation and dynamics of main nutrients in soil15. Nitrogen recycling and remobilisation are differentially controlled by leaf senescence

Section IV: Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Nutrition16. Genetic engineering and molecular strategies for nutrient manipulation in plants
17. Genotypic factors determining nutrient use efficiency in plants
18. Regulating root activity and nutrient uptake in plants: molecular physiological mechanisms
19. Plant mineral nutrition and membrane transport in plants

Section V: 20. Efficient Management of Plant Nutrients for Augmenting Crop, Soil and Environmental Quality
21. Leaching of plant nutrients from agricultural lands and its management
22. Plant-microbe interactions for phosphate management in tropical soils
23. Plant-microbe interaction for nutrient management
24. Improving plant phosphorus (P) acquisition by phosphate solubilizing rhizobacteria under P deficient environment
25. Soil microorganisms and nutrient phytoremediation
26. Nutrient Management: Getting Ready for Battle against Biotic Stress

List of Contributors
Gyanendranath Mitra, Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Soil Science and Biochemistry, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology (OUAT), Bhubaneswar, India
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Isabel Cacador, MARE, Marine and Environmental Science Center, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Manish Mathur, Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur, IndiaArti Goel, Amity Institute of Microbial Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida, India
Meththika Vithanage, Chemical and Environmental Systems Modeling Research Group, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka
Dibyendu Sarkar, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, Bidhan Chandra Agricultural University, India
Lohit K. Baishya, Indian Council of Agricultural Research Research Complex for North Eastern Hill Region Imphal, Manipur, India
Tariq Ahmad Dar, Centre For Biodiversity Studies, School Of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Baba Ghulam Shah Badshah University, Rajouri, India
Moin Uddin, Botany Section, Women's College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
M. Masroor A. Khan, Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Akbar Ali, Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
K.P. Baiyeri, Dept. of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
F. D. Ugese, Dept. of Crop Production, University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria
Minu Singh, Proteomics & Bioinformatics Lab, Department of Biotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
Arlene Asthana Ali, Proteomics & Bioinformatics Lab, Department of Biotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
Mirza Hasanuzzaman, Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka, BangladeshMolecular Biotechnology Laboratory, Center of Molecular Biosciences, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan
Kamrun Nahar, Department of Agricultural Botany, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka, BangladeshLaboratory of Plant Stress Responses, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan
Anisur Rahman1, Laboratory of Plant Stress Responses, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan
Jubayer-Al Mahmud, Laboratory of Plant Stress Responses, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan
Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Bangladesh
Md. Shahadat Hossain, Laboratory of Plant Stress Responses, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan
Md. Khairul Alam, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia
Hirosuke Oku, Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory, Center of Molecular Biosciences, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan
Masayuki Fujita, Laboratory of Plant Stress Responses, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan
M. Naeem, Plant Physiology Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India Abid Ali Ansari, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Tariq Aftab, Plant Physiology Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Mohd Idrees, Mathematics and Sciences Unit, College of Arts and Applied Sciences, Dhofar University, Sultanate of Oman Akbar Ali, Plant Physiology Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India M. Masroor A. Khan, Plant Physiology Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Dorina Podar, Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Romania
Bouzid Nedjimi, Laboratory of Exploration and Valorization of Steppe Ecosystem, Faculty of Science of Nature and Life, University of Djelfa, Algeria
Katalin SÁRDI, University of Pannonia, Department of Crop Production and Soil Science, Hungary
Céline Masclaux-Daubresse, Institut Jean-Pierre Bourgin (IJPB) UMR 1318, French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), Versailles Cedex, France
Claudio Inostroza-Blancheteau1, Núcleo de Investigación en Producción Alimentaria (NIPA-UCT), School of Agronomy, Faculty of National Resources, Temuco Catholic University, Temuco, ChileFelipe Aquea, Laboratory of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering and Sciences, Adolfo Ibáñez University, Santiago, Chile
Felipe Moraga, Laboratory of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering and Sciences, Adolfo Ibáñez University, Santiago, Chile
Cristian Ibañez, Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Biology Department, University of La Serena, La Serena, Chile
Zed Rengel, Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia Marjorie Reyes-Díaz, Departamento de Ciencias Químicas y Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, University of La Frontera,, Temuco, ChileCenter of Plant, Soil Interaction and Natural Resources Biotechnology, Scientific and Technological Bioresource Nucleus (BIOREN), University of La Frontera, Temuco, Chile
Nicolaus von Wirén, Molecular Plant Nutrition, Department of Physiology & Cell Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant, Genetics & Crop Plant Research, Germany
R.A. Gaxiola, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, United States
Sergey Shabala, Stress Physiology Laboratory, School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Australia
Kaushik Batabyal, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, Bidhan Chandra Agricultural University, India
I.Rashmi, Abhay Shirale, Kartika K.S., Shinogi K.C., Meena1 B.P.Division of Soil Chemistry and Fertility, Indian Institute of Soil Science, India
Nelson W. Osorio, Laura Osorno, Juan D. Leon, Claudia ÁlvarezUniversidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin, Colombia
T. M. Sa , Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea
Muhammad Saleem Arif, Department of Environmental Sciences & Engineering, GC University Faisalabad, Pakistan
Nelson Walter Osorio Vega, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Medellín, School of Biosciences, Colombia
Amitava Rakshit, Omkar Kumar, Sumit Rai, Manoj Parihar, Ranjeet Singh Yadav and Avinash RaiDepartment of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India
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