Forest Structure, Function and Dynamics in Western Amazonia

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 28. Dezember 2016
  • |
  • 224 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-09068-7 (ISBN)
 
The Amazon Basin contains the largest and most diverse tropical rainforest in the world. Besides the Andes and the Atlantic Ocean, the rainforest is bounded to the north by the Guiana crystalline shield and to the south by the Brazilian crystalline shield, marked at their edges by cataracts in the rivers and often dominated by grasslands. This book is motivated not just by the Amazon's scientific interest but also by its role in many ecosystem functions critical to life on Earth. These ecosystems are characterized both by their complexity and their interactive, higher-order linkages among both abiotic and biotic components.Within Amazonia, the Western Amazon (west of 65° latitude) is the most pristine and, perhaps, the most complex within the Amazon Basin. This Western Amazon may be broadly divided into non-flooded forests (e.g. terra firme, white sand, palm) and forests flooded with white water (generally referred to as várzea) and with black water (generally referred to as igapó). Here, for the first time, is a book devoted entirely to Western Amazonia, containing chapters by scientists at the forefront of their own areas of expertise. It should be a valuable resource for all future researchers and scholars who venture into Western Amazonia, as it continues to be one of the most beautiful, mysterious, remote and important ecosystems on Earth.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 5,13 MB
978-1-119-09068-7 (9781119090687)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Randall Myster is a Professor at the Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma City. He is a well known tropical forest ecologist and has published more than 50 papers and edited two books previously.
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Prologue
  • Chapter 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 The Amazon
  • 1.2 The Western Amazon
  • 1.2.1 Case study: Sabalillo Forest Reserve
  • 1.2.2 Case study: Area de Conservacion Regional Comunal de Tamshiyacu-Tahuayo
  • 1.2.3 Case study: Centro de Investigacion de Jenaro Herrera
  • 1.2.4 Case study: Yasuní experimental station
  • 1.3 About this book
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 2 A Floristic Assessment of Ecuador's Amazon Tree Flora
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Methods
  • 2.3 Study area
  • 2.3.1 Yasuní
  • 2.3.2 Cuyabeno
  • 2.4 Herbarium collections
  • 2.5 Floristic inventories
  • 2.6 Data analysis
  • 2.6.1 Estimation of observed and expected tree species richness
  • 2.7 Results
  • 2.7.1 Observed patterns of tree species richness
  • 2.7.2 Estimated number of tree species in Ecuadorian Amazonia
  • 2.7.3 Floristic relationships and discontinuities at local and regional scales
  • 2.8 Aguarico-Putumayo watershed
  • 2.9 Napo-Curaray basin
  • 2.10 Pastaza basin region
  • 2.11 Cordillera del Cóndor lowlands
  • 2.12 What factors drive gradients in alpha and beta diversity in Ecuador Amazon forests?
  • 2.12.1 Climate and latitudinal and longitudinal gradients
  • 2.13 The role of geomorphology and soils on the patterns of floristic change in Ecuadorian Amazonia
  • 2.14 Potential evolutionary processes determining differences in tree alpha and beta diversity in Ecuadorian Amazonia
  • 2.15 Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Geographical Context of Western Amazonian Forest Use
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Conditions set by the physical geography
  • 3.3 Pre-Colonial human development
  • 3.4 Colonial era
  • 3.5 Liberation and forming of nations
  • 3.6 World market integration and changing political regimes
  • 3.7 Characteristics of the present forest use
  • 3.8 Present population and regional integration
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Forest Structure, Fruit Production and Frugivore Communities in Terra firme and Várzea Forests of the Médio Juruá
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Methods
  • 4.3 Results and discussion
  • 4.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Palm Diversity and Abundance in the Colombian Amazon
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Study area
  • 5.3 Methods
  • 5.4 Results
  • 5.4.1 Palms in terra firme forests (Figure 5.2)
  • 5.4.2 Palms in floodplain and terrace forests (Figure 5.6)
  • 5.5 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Why Rivers Make the Difference: A Review on the Phytogeography of Forested Floodplains in the Amazon Basin
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 The geological history of flood-pulsing wetlands in the Amazon Basin
  • 6.2.1 Through the Paleogene
  • 6.2.2 The Miocene
  • 6.2.3 The Quaternary
  • 6.3 Floodplain environments: why rivers make the difference
  • 6.3.1 Trees and flooding
  • 6.3.2 Trees and dispersal in semi-aquatic habitats
  • 6.3.3 Trees and alluvial soils
  • 6.3.4 Trees, hydro-geomorphic disturbance and light regimes
  • 6.3.5 Trees and wetland microclimates
  • 6.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7 A Diversity of Biogeographies in an Extreme Amazonian Wetland Habitat
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Methods
  • 7.2.1 Habitat description
  • 7.2.2 Vegetation sampling
  • 7.3 Construction of a biogeographic framework
  • 7.4 Results
  • 7.5 Discussion
  • 7.5.1 Insights into local assemblies
  • 7.5.2 Insights into biogeographic processes
  • 7.5.3 Limits of the data
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Forest Composition and Spatial Patterns across a Western Amazonian River Basin: The Influence of Plant-Animal Interactions
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Methods
  • 8.2.1 Site description and history
  • 8.2.2 Study design
  • 8.3 Analysis
  • 8.3.1 Compositional patterns
  • 8.3.2 Spatial patterns
  • 8.4 Results
  • 8.4.1 Compositional patterns
  • 8.4.2 Spatial patterns
  • 8.4.3 Inter-cohort spatial patterns
  • 8.5 Discussion
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Bird Assemblages in the Terra Firme Forest at Yasun[[\'i]] National Park
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Methods
  • 9.3 Results and discussion
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Conclusions, Synthesis and Future Directions
  • 10.1 Conclusions
  • 10.2 Synthesis
  • 10.3 Future directions
  • References
  • Index
  • EULA

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