Human Fatigue Risk Management

Improving Safety in the Chemical Processing Industry
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 282 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802664-9 (ISBN)
 

Human Fatigue Risk Management: Improving Safety in the Chemical Processing Industry teaches users everything they need to know to mitigate the risk of fatigued workers in a plant or refinery. As human fatigue has been directly linked to several major disasters, the book explores the API RP 755 guidelines that were released to reduce these types of incidents. This book will help users follow API RP 755 and/or implement a fatigue risk management system in their organization.

Susan Murray, a recognized expert in the field of sleep deprivation and its relation to high hazard industries, has written this book to be useful for HSE managers, plant and project managers, occupational safety professionals, and engineers and managers in the chemical processing industry. As scheduling of shifts is an important factor in reducing fatigue and accident rates, users will learn the benefits of more frequent staff rotation and how to implement an ideal scheduling plan.

The book goes beyond API RP 755, offering more detailed understanding of why certain measures for managing fatigue are beneficial to a company, including examples of how theory can be put into practice. It is a simple, digestible book for managers who are interested in addressing human factor issues at their workplace in order to raise safety standards.


  • Covers sleep, sleep disorders, and the consequences of fatigue as related to high-hazard industries
  • Helps improve safety standards at the plant level
  • Provides information on how to comply with API RP 755 and related OSHA 29CFR1910 articles
  • Relates fatigue and human performance to accidents, helping readers make a case for implementing a human fatigue risk management policy, which, in turn, prevents loss of property and life


Susan L. Murray, Ph.D., P.E., Professor - Engineering Management & Systems Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology
http://web.mst.edu/-murray/resume.html
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 11,09 MB
978-0-12-802664-9 (9780128026649)
0128026642 (0128026642)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1 - The consequences of fatigue in the process industries
  • 1.1 - BP Texas City
  • 1.2 - Human factors and the BP Texas City accident
  • 1.3 - A "Wake-up" call for the processing industry
  • References
  • Chapter 2 - Basics of sleep biology
  • 2.1 - What is sleep?
  • 2.2 - Identifying sleep
  • 2.2.1 - Sleep fragmentation
  • 2.2.2 - Sleep inertia
  • 2.3 - What is sleep good for?
  • 2.3.1 - The concept of Process S
  • 2.3.2 - How much sleep does one need?
  • 2.4 - Consequences of sleep deprivation
  • 2.4.1 - Cognitive performance
  • 2.4.1.1 - Sleepiness
  • 2.4.1.2 - Cognitive performance
  • 2.4.1.3 - Emotion, vigor, quality of life
  • 2.4.1.4 - Presenteeism, tardiness, and absenteeism
  • 2.4.2 - Health consequences of sleep deprivation
  • 2.4.2.1 - Cardiovascular
  • 2.4.2.2 - Obesity
  • 2.4.2.3 - Endocrine effect
  • 2.4.2.4 - Blood glucose levels
  • 2.4.2.5 - Immune system
  • 2.5 - Benefits of sleep
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Circadian rhythms and sleep-circadian interactions
  • 3.1 - Circadian rhythms
  • 3.1.1 - What are circadian rhythms?
  • 3.1.2 - Environmental cues that entrain circadian rhythms
  • 3.1.3 - Health problems associated with circadian rhythms and shift work
  • 3.1.4 - Jet lag and daylight savings time
  • 3.1.5 - Circadian rhythms in the infants and the elderly
  • 3.2 - Interaction between sleepiness and circadian rhythms
  • 3.2.1 - Alertness and vigilance: interaction between circadian rhythms and sleep pressure
  • 3.2.2 - Shift work
  • 3.2.3 - Melatonin
  • 3.2.4 - Sleep inertia
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - Sleep hygiene recommendations
  • 4.1 - Make sleep a priority
  • 4.2 - Light
  • 4.3 - Consistent bedtime
  • 4.4 - Bedtime routine
  • 4.5 - Noise
  • 4.6 - Temperature
  • 4.7 - Stimulants
  • 4.7.1 - Caffeine
  • 4.7.2 - Decongestants
  • 4.7.3 - Weight loss pills
  • 4.7.4 - Nicotine
  • 4.7.5 - Alcohol
  • 4.8 - Sleeping environment
  • 4.9 - Pain
  • 4.10 - Diet
  • 4.11 - Naps
  • 4.12 - Body posture
  • 4.13 - Exercise
  • 4.14 - Age
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - Sleep disorders
  • 5.1 - Sleep apnea
  • 5.2 - Insomnia
  • 5.3 - Narcolepsy
  • 5.4 - Restless leg syndrome (RLS)/Willis-Ekbom disease (WED)
  • 5.5 - Shift work disorder
  • 5.6 - Sleep-wake phase disorders
  • 5.6.1 - Advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD)
  • 5.6.2 - Delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD)
  • 5.7 - Parasomnias
  • 5.7.1 - Non-REM parasomnias: sleepwalking, sleep-related eating, sleep violence, sleep sex, night terrors
  • 5.7.2 - REM behavior disorder
  • 5.8 - Fatal familial insomnia
  • 5.9 - Hypersomnias
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - Fatigue and human performance
  • 6.1 - Fatigue and human error
  • 6.2 - Fatigue and hand-eye coordination
  • 6.3 - Fatigue and mood
  • 6.4 - Fatigue and memory
  • 6.5 - Fatigue and reaction time
  • 6.6 - Fatigue and attention
  • 6.7 - Fatigue and cognitive tunneling
  • 6.8 - Fatigue and decision making
  • 6.9 - Fatigue and working with others
  • 6.10 - Fatigue and marital life
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Fatigue and accidents
  • 7.1 - Bhopal-fatigue and poor abnormal situation response
  • 7.2 - American Airlines 1420-fatigue and decline in situation awareness
  • 7.3 - NASA space shuttle-fatigue and decision making
  • 7.4 - Exxon Valdez-fatigue and work schedules
  • 7.5 - Three Mile Island and cognitive tunneling
  • 7.6 - Metro-North train derailment fatigue caused by circadian rhythms and sleep apnea
  • 7.7 - Fatigue's role in accidents
  • References
  • Chapter 8 - Fatigue-related regulations and guidelines
  • 8.1 - OSHA and fatigue risk
  • 8.2 - NIOSH sleep-related publications
  • 8.3 - UK and EU regulations
  • 8.4 - Transportation fatigue regulations
  • 8.5 - Healthcare fatigue regulations
  • 8.6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Fatigue counter measures
  • 9.1 - Schedule
  • 9.1.1 - Exercise
  • 9.1.2 - Naps
  • 9.2 - Food and drink
  • 9.3 - A sleep-friendly bedroom
  • 9.4 - Lighting
  • 9.5 - Getting to sleep or back to sleep
  • 9.6 - Conclusions
  • Chapter 10 - Work shifts
  • 10.1 - Shift work
  • 10.2 - Work-shift schedule design
  • 10.3 - Managing work-shift scheduling
  • 10.4 - Evaluating work shifts using the HSE fatigue index
  • 10.4.1 - Fatigue Index Factor 3-Rest periods
  • 10.4.2 - Fatigue Index Factor 4-Breaks
  • 10.4.3 - Fatigue Index Factor 5-Cumulative fatigue
  • 10.5 - An example of Health and Safety Executive's fatigue index
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Work environment
  • 11.1 - Introduction
  • 11.2 - Lighting
  • 11.3 - Temperature
  • 11.4 - Noise
  • 11.5 - Vibration
  • 11.6 - Color
  • References
  • Chapter 12 - Work task design
  • 12.1 - Introduction to work design
  • 12.2 - Work stress
  • 12.3 - Administrative solutions for work design issues
  • 12.4 - Workplace exercise
  • 12.5 - Engineering solutions for work design issues
  • 12.6 - Error proofing
  • 12.7 - Human reliability analysis
  • References
  • Chapter 13 - Employee training
  • 13.1 - Introduction
  • 13.2 - Addressing FRMS training reluctance
  • 13.3 - Training topics
  • 13.4 - Ways to Engage Trainees
  • 13.5 - Training for supervisors
  • 13.6 - Freely available FRMS training materials
  • 13.7 - FRMS training assessment
  • References
  • Chapter 14 - Naps
  • 14.1 - Perceptions of napping
  • 14.2 - Is sleepiness a problem at work?
  • 14.2.1 - How much sleep and what quality of sleep are workers getting?
  • 14.2.2 - What are the consequences of the disrupted and inadequate sleep?
  • 14.2.3 - How do people deal with inadequate sleep?
  • 14.2.4 - Is napping appropriate for the workplace and would individuals actually nap?
  • 14.3 - Benefits of naps
  • 14.4 - Strategic napping
  • 14.4.1 - Nap duration
  • 14.4.2 - When the nap occurs during the day
  • 14.4.3 - Future sleep debt
  • 14.4.4 - Sleep inertia
  • 14.5 - Napping recommendations for the workplace and for shiftwork
  • 14.6 - Nap facilities
  • 14.6.1 - Dedicated nap facilities
  • References
  • Chapter 15 - Compounds that alter sleep and wakefulness
  • 15.1 - Over-the-counter substances
  • 15.1.1 - Coffee/caffeinated drinks
  • 15.1.1.1 - Chart of caffeinated beverages
  • 15.1.2 - Alcohol
  • 15.1.3 - Nicotine
  • 15.1.4 - Antihistamines
  • 15.1.5 - Decongestant cough medications
  • 15.2 - Prescription medications meant to alter sleep and sleepiness
  • 15.2.1 - Benzodiazepines
  • 15.2.2 - Nonbenzodiazipines somnogenics
  • 15.2.3 - Suvorexant
  • 15.2.4 - Modanfinil/armodafinil
  • 15.2.5 - Melatonin/melatonin receptor agonists
  • 15.3 - Common prescriptions that can alter sleep regulation
  • 15.3.1 - ß-Blockers
  • 15.3.2 - Antidepressants
  • 15.3.3 - Corticosteroids
  • References
  • Chapter 16 - Creating a fatigue risk management system (FRMS)
  • 16.1 - Call for fatigue risk management systems (FRMS)
  • 16.2 - Purpose of an FRMS
  • 16.3 - Roles and responsibilities
  • 16.4 - FRMS implementation
  • 16.5 - Training
  • 16.6 - Hours of service limits
  • 16.7 - FRMS resources
  • 16.8 - Assessing an FRMS
  • 16.9 - FRMS quality assurance questions
  • References
  • Chapter 17 - Accident investigation
  • 17.1 - Investigating accidents, incidents, and near misses
  • 17.2 - Considering human factors in an investigation
  • 17.3 - Fatigue as a contributing factor in accidents
  • 17.4 - Sample NTSB fatigue-related accident investigation
  • 17.5 - BP Texas City CSB investigation
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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