Corporate Environmental Accountability in International Law

 
 
Oxford University Press
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 3. September 2020
  • |
  • 370 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-19-105794-6 (ISBN)
 
This fully updated second edition of Corporate Accountability in International Environmental Law examines systematically all international sources of corporate accountability standards with specific reference to environmental protection, and elaborates on their theoretical and practical implications for international environmental law. The book argues that although international environmental law does not bind multinational corporations and other business entities, growing practice points to the emergence and consolidation of international legal standards. These standards allow adapting and translating inter-State obligations embodied in international environmental law into specific normative benchmarks to determine the legitimacy of the conduct of the private sector against internationally recognized values and rules. The role of international organizations who, in the absence of State intervention, identify and promote the application of selected international environmental standards is analyzed in depth. This analysis demonstrates how these international organizations are a driving force in establishing and operationalizing international standards for corporate environmental accountability. The new edition includes a recent assessment of the Rio+20 Summit, analysis of the UN Framework on Business and Human Rights, and the 2012 Performance Standards. It contains a discussion on the role of 'fair and equitable benefit-sharing' under the Convention on Biological Diversity and international human rights law, and analysis of the monitoring practice of the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples' Rights. This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations.
2. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 0,81 MB
978-0-19-105794-6 (9780191057946)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Elisa Morgera is Professor of Global Environmental Law and Co-Director of Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance. She specializes in international, European and comparative environmental law, and has published widely on biodiversity, environmental governance, corporate environmental accountability, and the EU external environmental policy. Elisa was a former officer of the UN Development Programme and UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Since 2012 she has conducted a series of consultancies for the FAO and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to support the development of new international standards on responsible business conduct in the agricultural sector.
  • Cover
  • Corporate Environmental Accountability in International?Law
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Preface to the Second Edition (2019)
  • Acknowledgements
  • Contents
  • Table of Cases
  • Table of Treaties
  • List of Acronyms
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1 The case for an international approach to corporate environmental accountability
  • 2 The case for corporate engagement in environmental protection
  • 3 History and definitions
  • 3.1 From Stockholm to Johannesburg
  • 3.2 Rio+20 and the green economy
  • 4 Corporate responsibility and/?or corporate accountability?
  • 4.1 The concept of corporate responsibility
  • 4.2 The concept of corporate accountability
  • 5 Aim and structure of the book
  • 2 The Shortcomings of Traditional Legal Solutions
  • 1 The shortcomings of national control
  • 1.1 Host State control
  • 1.2 Home State control
  • 1.2.1 Application of international law by national courts
  • 2 The limits of international?law
  • 2.1 International law on State responsibility
  • 2.2 International regimes on civil liability for environmental damage: en impasse?
  • 2.3 International environmental crimes?
  • 2.4 Balancing the international protection of foreign investment
  • 2.5 Synergies with international human rights?law
  • 2.5.1 Legal arguments
  • 2.6 The status of multinational companies in international?law
  • 3 Concluding remarks
  • 3 The Emergence of International Standards
  • 1 International standards and the sources of international?law
  • 1.1 The distinctive nature of legal standards
  • 1.2 International standards as soft?law
  • 1.3 The functions of international standards
  • 2 Attempts at international regulation: the UN draft Code of Conduct on Transnational Corporations
  • 2.1 Environmental content
  • 2.2 Legacy
  • 3 Subsequent practice of the UN in the 1990s: the partnership approach
  • 3.1 The UN Global Compact
  • 3.1.1 Legal significance
  • 3.1.2 Environmental content
  • 4 The human rights-?based approach
  • 4.1 The Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with regard to Human Rights
  • 4.1.1 Legal significance
  • 4.1.2 Environmental content
  • 4.1.3 Legacy
  • 4.2 The UN Framework and Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights
  • 4.2.1 Conceptual and normative contributions
  • 4.2.2 Legacy: the Working Group on Business and Human Rights
  • 4.2.3 Environmental relevance?
  • 5 The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
  • 5.1 Conceptual approach and legal significance
  • 5.2 Environmental content
  • 5.3 Legacy
  • 6 The Performance Standards of the International Finance Corporation
  • 6.1 The?IFC
  • 6.2 The IFC environmental standards
  • 6.3 Operational distinctiveness and broader trend-?setting value
  • 7 Preliminary conclusions and their relevance for a new treaty on business and human rights
  • 4 Assessing the Convergence of International Standards on Corporate Environmental Accountability
  • 1 The Convention on Biodiversity and the private sector
  • 1.1 The extent to which the CBD has addressed corporate environmental accountability and responsibility
  • 2 International standards on corporate environmental accountability
  • 2.1 Environmental integration
  • 2.1.1 (Self-?)assessment of environmental impacts
  • 2.1.1.1 Cumulative impacts
  • 2.1.1.2 Outcomes
  • 2.1.1.3 Links with consultation
  • 2.1.2 Environmental management system
  • 2.1.2.1 Substantive dimensions
  • 2.2 Prevention
  • 2.2.1 Substantive dimensions
  • 2.3 Precaution
  • 2.4 Disclosure of environmental information
  • 2.4.1 Recipients of information
  • 2.4.2 Types of information
  • 2.4.3 Degree of disclosure
  • 2.5 Consultation with potentially affected communities
  • 2.6 Grievance
  • 3 Preliminary conclusions
  • 5 Assessing the Convergence of International Standards on Corporate Environmental Responsibility
  • 1 Indigenous peoples and local communities
  • 1.1 Environmental and socio-?cultural impact (self-?)assessment
  • 1.2 Free prior informed consent
  • 1.2.1 Meaning of consent
  • 1.2.2 Appropriate representation
  • 1.2.3 Iterative and culturally appropriate modalities
  • 1.2.4 Documentation and community protocols
  • 1.3 Fair and equitable benefit-?sharing
  • 1.3.1 Kinds of benefits
  • 1.3.2 Cautions
  • 1.3.3 Business-?community agreements
  • 2 Protected areas
  • 2.1 Natural and cultural heritage
  • 2.2 Natural areas
  • 3 Sustainable use of natural resources
  • 3.1 Threatened or endangered species
  • 3.2 Sustainable production
  • 3.3 Ecosystem services
  • 3.4 Invasive alien species
  • 3.5 Habitats
  • 3.6 Sustainable agri-?business
  • 4 Preliminary conclusions
  • 6 International Oversight
  • 1 Tools for compliance?
  • 2 The implementation procedure of the OECD Guidelines
  • 2.1 Evolution of the procedure
  • 2.2 Variation in outcomes
  • 2.3 Promoting normative coherence
  • 2.4 Inter-?institutional cooperation
  • 2.5 Continued challenges
  • 3 Compliance under the?IFC
  • 3.1 Contract-?related procedures
  • 3.1.1 Internal assessment
  • 3.1.1.1 Implementation of biodiversity standards
  • 3.2 Ombudsman function of the?CAO
  • 3.2.1 Variation in outcomes
  • 3.2.2 Mediation and fair and equitable benefit-?sharing
  • 4 Human rights monitoring bodies and special procedures
  • 4.1 Country visits by UN Special Rapporteurs
  • 4.1.1 UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples' Rights
  • 4.1.2 UN Special Rapporteur on Toxics
  • 5 Complaints before the UN Global Compact
  • 6 Concluding remarks
  • Conclusions: Contributions and Areas for Further Research
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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