Designing Knowledge Organizations

A Pathway to Innovation Leadership
 
 
John Wiley & Sons Inc (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 14. Juli 2017
  • |
  • 448 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-07877-7 (ISBN)
 
A pedagogical approach to the principles and architecture of knowledge management in organizations
This textbook is based on a graduate course taught at Stevens Institute of Technology. It focuses on the design and management of today's complex K organizations. A K organization is any company that generates and applies knowledge. The text takes existing ideas from organizational design and knowledge management to enhance and elevate each through harmonization with concepts from other disciplines. The authors--noted experts in the field--concentrate on both micro- and macro design and their interrelationships at individual, group, work, and organizational levels.
A key feature of the textbook is an incisive discussion of the cultural, practice, and social aspects of knowledge management. The text explores the processes, tools, and infrastructures by which an organization can continuously improve, maintain, and exploit all elements of its knowledge base that are most relevant to achieve its strategic goals. The book seamlessly intertwines the disciplines of organizational design and knowledge management and offers extensive discussions, illustrative examples, student exercises, and visualizations. The following major topics are addressed:
* Knowledge management, intellectual capital, and knowledge systems
* Organizational design, behavior, and architecture
* Organizational strategy, change, and development
* Leadership and innovation
* Organizational culture and learning
* Social networking, communications, and collaboration
* Strategic human resources; e.g., hiring K workers and performance reviews
* Knowledge science, thinking, and creativity
* Philosophy of knowledge and information
* Information, knowledge, social, strategy, and contract continuums
* Information management and intelligent systems; e.g., business intelligence, big data, and cognitive systems
Designing Knowledge Organizations takes an interdisciplinary and original approach to assess and synthesize the disciplines of knowledge management and organizational design, drawing upon conceptual underpinnings and practical experiences in these and related areas.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
JOSEPH MORABITO is professor in the School of Business, Stevens Institute of Technology. Professor Morabito's research interests include organizational design, knowledge management, business intelligence, and big data.
IRA SACK has served as professor at the Howe School of Technology Management, Stevens Institute of Technology. He led the design and development of master's and doctoral programs in information management.
ANILKUMAR BHATE consults in the areas of technology and product development, systemsengineering, and business management.
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction to Knowledge Systems
  • I.1 MachineVersus Art Metaphor
  • I.2 Designand the Ordering of Ideas
  • I.3 Organizationof the Book
  • I.4 Howto Read This Book
  • I.5 AJourney Through KS
  • References
  • Chapter 1 Understanding Knowledge
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 1.1 The New Pangaea
  • 1.2 Characterizing the Knowledge Economy
  • 1.3 A Glimpse into the Knowledge Society
  • 1.4 Industrial Revolutions
  • 1.5 The Social Challenge of the Knowledge Economy
  • 1.5.1 The Challenge of Robots
  • 1.6 A Macro Perspective of Knowledge Management
  • 1.7 Architecture of the Organization
  • 1.8 Data, Information, and Knowledge
  • 1.9 Distinctions in the Information Continuum
  • 1.10 Revisiting the Information Continuum
  • 1.11 Knowledge As Such
  • 1.11.1 Indian Thought
  • 1.11.2 Chinese Thought
  • 1.11.3 Greek and Western Thought
  • 1.12 A Brief Comparative Perspective and the Knowledge Triangle
  • 1.12.1 Knowledge Triangle
  • 1.13 Conceptions of Knowledge in Practice
  • 1.13.1 Justified True Belief (Plato)
  • 1.13.2 Dynamic Cognitive Experience (Polanyi)
  • 1.13.3 Spiral of Knowledge
  • 1.13.4 Toward a Working Definition of Knowledge
  • 1.13.5 Knowledging and Pattern Formation
  • 1.14 The Relationship among Different Perspectives
  • 1.15 Intangible Assets and Organizational Response
  • 1.15.1 Ownership and Contribution to the Organization
  • 1.16 Valuation, Intangibles, and Intellectual Capital
  • 1.16.1 Student Observations
  • 1.16.2 Student Exercises
  • 1.17 Closing Remarks
  • Two KM Divides
  • Cultural Integration
  • Information Continuum
  • Models of Knowledge
  • Intellectual Capital
  • The School of Athens
  • 1.18 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Designing Knowledge Systems
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 2.1 Perspectives of Knowledge
  • 2.1.1 Transition to the Modern Worldview
  • 2.1.2 Modern Philosophy and Knowledge
  • 2.1.3 Hegel
  • 2.1.4 Popper and Kuhn
  • 2.2 Knowledge Worlds
  • 2.2.1 The K-Worlds of Art and Science (and Management)
  • 2.3 Inquiry Systems and the Search for True Knowledge
  • 2.3.1 Types of Inquiry Systems
  • 2.3.2 Types of Problems and Errors
  • 2.3.3 Messy Systems
  • 2.4 The Basics of Design in the Knowledge Era
  • 2.4.1 Dialectic and Synthesis
  • 2.4.2 Theory of Organizational Knowledge Creation: SECI
  • 2.4.3 The Concept of Ba
  • 2.4.4 Middle-Up-Down Management
  • 2.4.5 Hypertext Organization
  • 2.4.6 Organizational and Process Enablers
  • 2.4.7 Single- and Double-Loop Learning
  • 2.5 New Directions in Knowledge Design
  • 2.5.1 Integrated Understanding of K Models and Representations
  • 2.5.2 Thin and Thick
  • 2.5.3 Knowledge Spaces
  • 2.5.4 Asymmetrical and Symmetrical Interactions
  • 2.5.5 Layers of Thin-Thick Interactions
  • 2.5.6 The Creative Process of Knowledging: CPK
  • 2.5.7 Knowledge Binding
  • 2.5.8 Agreements and the Exchange of Knowledge
  • 2.6 Closing Remarks
  • 2.7 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Organizations and Systems
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 3.1 Organizations
  • 3.1.1 Schools of OT
  • 3.1.2 Materials of OT
  • 3.1.3 Organizational Structure
  • 3.2 Organizational Design
  • 3.2.1 Task Perspective on Design
  • 3.2.2 Information Process Theory and Design
  • 3.2.3 Generic Structures
  • 3.2.4 Organizational Architecture
  • 3.3 Systems Theory
  • 3.3.1 Characteristics and Evolution of Systems Theory
  • 3.4 HT and Design
  • 3.4.1 The Role of the Observer
  • 3.4.2 Complex Systems
  • 3.4.3 Selected Properties of Hierarchical Systems
  • 3.5 Organization Molecules
  • 3.6 Symmetrical Structures, Discourse, and Conversation
  • 3.7 Closing Remarks
  • 3.8 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Knowledge Work and Technology
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 4.1 What Is Knowledge Work?
  • 4.1.1 Student Exercise
  • 4.2 Classifying Knowledge Workers
  • 4.2.1 Degrees of Expertise
  • 4.3 Tacit Aspect of Knowledge Work
  • 4.3.1 Pencil Metaphor
  • 4.3.2 Industry Example
  • 4.4 Characterizing Thick Knowledge Work
  • 4.5 Architectural Perspective of Knowledge Work
  • 4.6 Process and Thin Work
  • 4.7 Practice and Thick Work
  • 4.7.1 Revisiting Tacit Knowledge in a Practice Context
  • 4.7.2 Unraveling Knowledge and Practice
  • 4.7.3 The Social Continuum
  • 4.7.4 Structure of Practice: Social Knowledge
  • 4.7.5 Enabling Practice in an Organization
  • 4.7.6 Toward a Fuller Understanding of K in Action: The K-Molecule
  • 4.7.7 Implications of Practice
  • 4.8 Knowledge Work and Supporting Technology
  • 4.8.1 Student Exercise: Integrated Job and Technology Analysis
  • 4.8.2 Decision Support Systems
  • 4.8.3 Business Intelligence
  • 4.8.4 Big Data
  • 4.8.5 The Internet of Things
  • 4.8.6 Cognitive Systems
  • 4.9 KM Tools and Technologies
  • 4.10 Robot Economy
  • 4.10.1 Impact of Automation
  • 4.10.2 Polanyi Paradox
  • 4.11 Closing Remarks
  • Practice
  • Technology
  • 4.12 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Organizations and Knowledge
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 5.1 Organizations and KM
  • 5.1.1 First Divide in KM
  • 5.1.2 Transition to the Second Divide in KM
  • 5.1.3 Second Divide KM
  • 5.2 Knowledge Revisited
  • 5.2.1 KM Versus Knowledge As Such
  • 5.2.2 Knowledge Perspectives and Representations
  • 5.3 Organizational Knowledge Cycles and Models
  • 5.3.1 Knowledge Cycles
  • 5.3.2 KM Maturity Models
  • 5.3.3 KM Models
  • 5.4 Application of Concepts: Case Study on the PC
  • 5.5 Knowledge Formation
  • 5.6 Knowledge Exchange and Transfer
  • 5.6.1 Knowledge Capture
  • 5.6.2 Knowledge Codification-Structuring Explicit K
  • 5.6.3 Knowledge Sharing
  • 5.7 Knowledge Base
  • 5.8 Organizational Design Representations
  • 5.8.1 Organizational-Level K in Context
  • 5.8.2 Archetype Design Pathways
  • 5.8.3 A Metaperspective on K Design in the Organization
  • 5.8.4 Organizational Structure and Knowledging
  • 5.8.5 Thin and Thick Organizational Design
  • 5.8.6 DNA Design Metaphor
  • 5.8.7 Organizational Metaschema
  • 5.9 Architecture of the Learning Organization
  • 5.9.1 Toward a Definition of the Learning Organization
  • 5.9.2 Two-Part Learning Cycle
  • 5.9.3 Building Blocks of OL
  • 5.9.4 OL and KM: Together
  • 5.10 Closing Remarks
  • Knowledge and the Organization
  • Continuums of Information and Knowledge
  • KM and Design
  • Social Knowing and Organizations
  • Toward a K-Based Theory of the Firm
  • 5.11 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Social Aspects of Knowledge Management
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 6.1 Social Networks
  • 6.1.1 Examples of Social Networks
  • 6.1.2 Common Network Structures in Small Groups
  • 6.1.3 Social Networking Theory
  • 6.2 Knowledge Network Design in Organizations
  • 6.2.1 Knowledge Networks
  • 6.3 Culture in the Knowledge Organization
  • Aspects of Culture
  • 6.3.1 Manifestations of Culture
  • 6.3.2 Assessing Organizational Culture
  • 6.3.3 Organizational Dysfunction and Learning
  • 6.3.4 Comparative Cultures
  • 6.4 Industry Example of Culture: Toyota
  • 6.5 Trust
  • 6.5.1 Trust Between Individuals
  • 6.5.2 Trust and Relationships: Social Architecture
  • 6.5.3 Trust and Culture
  • 6.6 Illustrative Example: Interorganizational K Exchange and Creation-Effects of Ties and Culture
  • 6.7 Collaboration
  • 6.7.1 Collaborative Innovation
  • 6.7.2 Culture and Collaboration
  • 6.7.3 Collaboration Structures and Databases
  • 6.7.4 Collaboration Tools and Systems
  • 6.7.5 Collaboration and Collaboratories: Taxonomies
  • 6.8 Collaborating with Creatives
  • Application: Artists
  • 6.9 Office Design
  • 6.9.1 The Growing Shift to Open Office Design
  • 6.9.2 Student Exercise: Examples of Office Design
  • 6.9.3 Office Space Analysis
  • 6.10 Promoting Conversations and Dialogue
  • 6.10.1 Dialogue Strategies: Lexus Case Study
  • 6.10.2 Managing Conversations
  • 6.10.3 Work-Related Individual Personality Types
  • 6.10.4 Job Role and Individual Personality Types
  • 6.10.5 Business System Personality Types
  • 6.10.6 Interaction Effects
  • 6.11 Closing Remarks
  • 6.12 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Strategy and Leadership for Knowledge Management
  • Chapter Preview
  • Introduction
  • Food for Thought
  • Topic Layout
  • 7.1 What Is Strategy?
  • Structure of Corporate Strategy
  • Which Comes First, Knowledge or Strategy?
  • Strategic Thrusts
  • 7.1.1 Strategy as K Synthesis
  • 7.1.2 Strategy as Unique Activities
  • 7.1.3 Schools of Strategy
  • 7.1.4 The Importance of Vision in Strategy
  • 7.1.5 Organizational Context for Strategy
  • 7.2 Strategy Continuum and the Knowledge Organization
  • 7.2.1 Enterprise Approach
  • 7.2.2 Strategy Continuum
  • 7.2.3 Integrative Strategy Stream
  • 7.3 Setting the Stage: Intangibles and a Knowledge Strategy
  • 7.3.1 Revisiting Core Competence
  • 7.4 Leadership and KM
  • 7.4.1 What Is leadership?
  • 7.4.2 Direct and Indirect Leadership
  • 7.4.3 Servant Leadership
  • 7.4.4 Expertise and Leadership
  • 7.4.5 Leadership and K Strategies
  • 7.5 Getting Started
  • 7.5.1 IC Guide
  • 7.5.2 Strategic Prescriptions
  • 7.6 Strategies for the Knowledge Organization-Tacit Bundle
  • 7.7 Culture Change
  • 7.7.1 Culture Formation
  • 7.7.2 Organizational Age and Culture Change
  • 7.7.3 Culture and KM
  • 7.8 Chief Knowledge Office
  • 7.8.1 CKO Structure
  • 7.8.2 Activities of the Chief Knowledge Office
  • 7.8.3 K-Base and Portal
  • 7.9 People Value Stream
  • 7.9.1 Human Resource Policies and K Workers
  • 7.9.2 Recruiting, Selecting, and Hiring People
  • 7.9.3 Training and Educating People-Building the Community
  • 7.9.4 PR, Recognition, and Rewards
  • 7.9.5 Rethinking Human Resources
  • 7.10 Closing Remarks
  • Strategy as an Integral Construct
  • Strategy of Strategies
  • Force of Culture
  • Culture in Mature Organizations
  • People Value Stream
  • People Value Stream 2.0
  • 7.11 Class Exercises
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Knowledge Horizons
  • 8.1 Knowledge Arises
  • 8.1.1 Opportunities to Promote Knowledge
  • 8.1.2 Three Triangles of Knowledge
  • 8.1.3 Evolution of Knowledge and the Knowledge Organization
  • 8.2 Digital Economy
  • 8.2.1 K Society Paradox
  • 8.2.2 Data
  • 8.2.3 Organizational Upheaval
  • 8.2.4 Organizational Design
  • 8.3 End of Course Questions for Discussion and Research
  • References
  • Appendix
  • Index
  • EULA

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