Engineering Risk Management

 
 
De Gruyter (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. Mai 2016
  • |
  • XII, 340 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-11-041804-0 (ISBN)
 
This revised 2nd edition of Engineering Risk Management presents engineering aspects of risk management. After an introduction to potential risks the authors presents management principles, risk diagnostics, analysis and treatments followed by examples of practical implementation in chemistry, physics and emerging technologies such as nanoparticles.
2nd ed.
  • Englisch
  • Berlin/Boston
  • |
  • Deutschland
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • |
  • US School Grade: From College Freshman to College Senior
  • Überarbeitete Ausgabe
  • 40
  • |
  • 30 s/w Abbildungen, 100 s/w Tabellen, 40 farbige Abbildungen
  • |
  • 30 b/w and 40 col. ill., 100 b/w tbl.
  • Breite: 170 mm
  • 8,63 MB
978-3-11-041804-0 (9783110418040)
3110418045 (3110418045)
http://www.degruyter.com/isbn/9783110418040
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Thierry Meyer, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéralede Lausanne, Switzerland; Genserik Reniers, University of Antwerp, Belgium.
  • About the authors
  • Contents
  • 1 Risk management is not only a matter of financial risk
  • References
  • 2 Introduction to engineering and managing risks
  • 2.1 Managing risks and uncertainties - an introduction
  • 2.2 The complexity of risks and uncertainties
  • 2.3 Hazards and risks
  • 2.4 Simplified interpretation of (negative) risk
  • 2.5 Hazard and risk mapping
  • 2.6 Risk perception and risk attitude
  • 2.7 ERM - main steps
  • 2.8 Objectives and importance of ERM
  • 2.9 The Black Swan (type III events)
  • 2.10 Conclusions
  • References
  • 3 Risk management principles
  • 3.1 Introduction to risk management
  • 3.2 Integrated risk management
  • 3.3 Risk management models
  • 3.3.1 Model of the accident pyramid
  • 3.3.2 The P2T model
  • 3.3.3 The Swiss cheese model and the domino theory
  • 3.4 The anatomy of an accident: SIFs and SILs
  • 3.5 Individual risk, societal risk, physical description of risk
  • 3.5.1 Location-based (individual) risk
  • 3.5.2 Societal risk or group risk
  • 3.5.3 Physical description of risk
  • 3.5.3.1 Static model of an accident
  • 3.5.3.2 Dynamic model of an accident
  • 3.6 Safety culture and safety climate
  • 3.6.1 Organizational culture and climate
  • 3.6.2 Safety culture models
  • 3.6.3 The P2T model revisited and applied to safety and security culture
  • 3.6.4 The Egg Aggregated Model (TEAM) of safety culture
  • 3.7 Strategic management concerning risks and continuous improvement
  • 3.8 The IDEAL S&S model
  • 3.8.1 Performance indicators
  • 3.9 Continuous improvement of organizational culture
  • 3.10 High reliability organizations and systemic risks
  • 3.10.1 Systems thinking
  • 3.10.1.1 Reaction time or retardant effect
  • 3.10.1.2 Law of communicating vessels
  • 3.10.1.3 Non-linear causalities
  • 3.10.1.4 Long-term vision
  • 3.10.1.5 Systems thinking conclusions
  • 3.10.2 Normal accident theory (NAT) and high reliability theory (HRT)
  • 3.10.3 High reliability organization (HRO) principles
  • 3.10.3.1 HRO principle 1: targeted at disturbances
  • 3.10.3.2 HRO principle 2: reluctant for simplification
  • 3.10.3.3 HRO principle 3: sensitive towards implementation
  • 3.10.3.4 HRO principle 4: devoted to resiliency
  • 3.10.3.5 HRO principle 5: respectful for expertise
  • 3.10.4 Risk and reliability
  • 3.11 Accident reporting
  • 3.12 Conclusions
  • References
  • 4 Risk diagnostic and analysis
  • 4.1 Introduction to risk assessment techniques
  • 4.1.1 Inductive and deductive approaches
  • 4.1.2 General methods for risk analysis
  • 4.1.3 General procedure
  • 4.1.4 General process for all analysis techniques
  • 4.2 SWOT
  • 4.3 Preliminary hazard analysis
  • 4.4 Checklist
  • 4.4.1 Methodology
  • 4.4.2 Example
  • 4.4.2.1 Step 1a: Critical difference, effect of energies failures
  • 4.4.2.2 Step 1b: Critical difference, deviation from the operating procedure
  • 4.4.2.3 Step 2: Establish the risk catalogue
  • 4.4.2.4 Step 3: risk mitigation
  • 4.4.3 Conclusion
  • 4.5 HAZOP
  • 4.5.1 HAZOP inputs and outputs
  • 4.5.2 HAZOP process
  • 4.5.3 Example
  • 4.5.4 Conclusions
  • 4.6 FMECA
  • 4.6.1 FMECA inputs and outputs
  • 4.6.2 FMECA process
  • 4.6.2.1 Step 1: Elaboration of the hierarchical model, functional analysis
  • 4.6.2.2 Step 2: Failure mode determination
  • 4.6.2.3 Step 3: The criticality determination
  • 4.6.3 Example
  • 4.6.4 Conclusions
  • 4.7 Fault tree analysis and event tree analysis
  • 4.7.1 Fault tree analysis
  • 4.7.2 Event tree analysis
  • 4.7.3 Cause-consequence-analysis (CCA): a combination of FTA and ETA
  • 4.8 The risk matrix
  • 4.9 Quantitative risk assessment (QRA)
  • 4.10 Layer of protection analysis
  • 4.11 Bayesian networks
  • 4.12 Conclusion
  • References
  • 5 Risk treatment/reduction
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Prevention
  • 5.2.1 Seveso Directive as prevention means for chemical plants
  • 5.2.2 Seveso company tiers
  • 5.3 Protection and mitigation
  • 5.4 Risk treatment
  • 5.5 Risk control
  • 5.6 STOP principle
  • 5.7 Resilience
  • 5.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • 6 Event analysis
  • 6.1 Traditional analytical techniques
  • 6.1.1 Sequence of events
  • 6.1.2 Multilinear events sequencing
  • 6.1.3 Root cause analysis
  • 6.2 Causal tree analysis
  • 6.2.1 Method description
  • 6.2.2 Collecting facts
  • 6.2.3 Event investigation good practice
  • 6.2.4 Building the tree
  • 6.2.5 Example
  • 6.2.6 Building an action plan
  • 6.2.7 Implementing solutions and follow-up
  • 6.3 Conclusions
  • References
  • 7 Major industrial accidents and learning from accidents
  • 7.1 Link between major accidents and legislation
  • 7.2 Major industrial accidents: examples
  • 7.2.1 Feyzin, France, January 1966
  • 7.2.2 Flixborough, UK, June 1974
  • 7.2.3 Seveso, Italy, July 1976
  • 7.2.4 Los Alfaques, Spain, July 1978
  • 7.2.5 Mexico City, Mexico, November 1984
  • 7.2.6 Bhopal, India, December 1984
  • 7.2.7 Chernobyl, Ukraine, April 1986
  • 7.2.8 Piper Alpha, North Sea, July 1988
  • 7.2.9 Pasadena, Texas, USA, October 1989
  • 7.2.10 Enschede, The Netherlands, May 2000
  • 7.2.11 Toulouse, France, September 2001
  • 7.2.12 Ath, Belgium, July 2004
  • 7.2.13 Houston, Texas, USA, March 2005
  • 7.2.14 St Louis, Missouri, USA, June 2005
  • 7.2.15 Buncefield, UK, December 2005
  • 7.2.16 Port Wenworth, Georgia, USA, February 2008
  • 7.2.17 Deepwater Horizon, Gulf of Mexico, April 2010
  • 7.2.18 Fukushima, Japan, March 2011
  • 7.2.19 West, Texas, USA, April, 2013
  • 7.2.20 La Porte, Texas, USA, November, 2014
  • 7.2.21 Tianjin, China, August, 2015
  • 7.3 Learning from accidents
  • 7.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • 8 Crisis management
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 The steps of crisis management
  • 8.2.1 What to do when a disruption occurs
  • 8.2.2 Business continuity plan
  • 8.3 Crisis evolution
  • 8.3.1 The pre-crisis stage or creeping crisis
  • 8.3.2 The acute-crisis stage
  • 8.3.3 The post-crisis stage
  • 8.3.4 Illustrative example of a crisis evolution
  • 8.4 Proactive or reactive crisis management
  • 8.5 Crisis communication
  • 8.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • 9 Economic issues of safety
  • 9.1 Accident costs and hypothetical benefits
  • 9.2 Prevention costs
  • 9.3 Prevention benefits
  • 9.4 The degree of safety and the minimum total cost point
  • 9.5 Safety economics and the two different types of risks
  • 9.6 Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis for occupational (type I) accidents
  • 9.6.1 Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • 9.6.2 Cost-benefit analysis
  • 9.6.2.1 Decision rule, present values and discount rate
  • 9.6.2.2 Disproportion factor
  • 9.6.2.3 Different cost-benefit ratios
  • 9.6.2.4 Cost-benefit analysis for safety measures
  • 9.6.3 Risk acceptability
  • 9.6.4 Using the event tree to decide about safety investments
  • 9.6.5 Advantages and disadvantages of analyses based on costs and benefits
  • 9.7 Optimal allocation strategy for the safety budget
  • 9.8 Loss aversion and safety investments - safety as economic value
  • 9.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • 10 Risk governance
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Risk management system
  • 10.3 A framework for risk and uncertainty governance
  • 10.4 The risk governance model (RGM)
  • 10.4.1 The "considering?" layer of the risk governance model
  • 10.4.2 The "results?" layer of the risk governance model
  • 10.4.3 The risk governance model
  • 10.5 A risk governance PDCA
  • 10.6 Risk governance deficits
  • 10.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • 11 Examples of practical implementation of risk management
  • 11.1 The MICE concept
  • 11.1.1 The management step
  • 11.1.2 The information and education step
  • 11.1.3 The control step
  • 11.1.4 The emergency step
  • 11.2 Application to chemistry research and chemical hazards
  • 11.3 Application to physics research and physics hazards
  • 11.3.1 Hazards of liquid cryogens
  • 11.3.2 Asphyxiation
  • 11.4 Application to emerging technologies
  • 11.4.1 Nanotechnologies as illustrative example
  • 11.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • 12 Concluding remarks
  • Index

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie eine Lese-Software, die das Dateiformat EPUB verarbeiten kann: z.B. Adobe Digital Editions oder FBReader - beide kostenlos (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

69,95 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung des WebShops erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok