Nanotechnology Commercialization

Manufacturing Processes and Products
 
 
Wiley-Aiche (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 20. Oktober 2017
  • |
  • 448 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-37173-1 (ISBN)
 
A fascinating and informative look at state-of-the-art nanotechnology research, worldwide, and its vast commercial potential
Nanotechnology Commercialization: Manufacturing Processes and Products presents a detailed look at the state of the art in nanotechnology and explores key issues that must still be addressed in order to successfully commercialize that vital technology. Written by a team of distinguished experts in the field, it covers a range of applications notably: military, space, and commercial transport applications, as well as applications for missiles, aircraft, aerospace, and commercial transport systems.
The drive to advance the frontiers of nanotechnology has become a major global initiative with profound economic, military, and environmental implications. Nanotechnology has tremendous commercial and economic implications with a projected $ 1.2 trillion-dollar global market. This book describes current research in the field and details its commercial potential--from work bench to market.
* Examines the state of the art in nanotechnology and explores key issues surrounding its commercialization
* Takes a real-world approach, with chapters written from a practical viewpoint, detailing the latest research and considering its potential commercial and defense applications
* Presents the current research and proposed applications of nanotechnology in such a way as to stimulate further research and development of new applications
* Written by an all-star team of experts, including pioneer patent-holders and award-winning researchers in nanotechnology
The major challenge currently faced by researchers in nanotechnology is successfully transitioning laboratory research into viable commercial products for the 21st century. Written for professionals across an array of research and engineering disciplines, Nanotechnology Commercialization: Manufacturing Processes and Products does much to help them bridge the gap between lab and marketplace.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • New York
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 15,87 MB
978-1-119-37173-1 (9781119371731)
1119371732 (1119371732)
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THOMAS O. MENSAH, PhD, is currently the President and CEO of the Georgia Aerospace Systems, an advanced aerospace composite manufacturing company, which has supplied nanoscale composite structures for unmanned aerial vehicle systems to the US Department of Defense. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors and is a holder of 7 US Patents. He has previously worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories and Corning Glass Works. He is a Director of AIChE Nanoscale Engineering Forum.
BEN WANG, PhD, Director of Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute. He is the Executive Director Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute. He is the co-developer of the first continuous process for making free standing carbon nanotube network or Bucky paper. Dr. Wang was awarded the Micro/NANO 25 Award by NASA and the Nanotechnology Institute and is the holder of 6 US patents. He is Chair of the Industrial Systems Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology.
GEOFFREY BOTHUN, PhD, is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Principal Investigator as well as Director of Rhode Island Consortium for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, a state wide Initiative. He is also Director of Rhode Island NSF EPSCoR and the current Chairman of AIChE Nanoscale Engineering Forum, NSEF.
JESSICA WINTER, PhD is the H.C. Slip Slider Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Ohio, Columbus. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers and a Fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science AAAS. She is Past Chairman of AIChE Nanoscale Engineering Forum NSEF.
VIRGINIA DAVIS, PhD is Associate Professor Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. She is Global Marketing manager at Shell Chemicals in Europe and serves as Director of AIChE Nanoscale Engineering Forum NSEF. She is the recipient of NSEF Young Investigator Award.
  • "Cover"
  • "Title Page"
  • "Copyright"
  • "Contents"
  • "List of Contributors"
  • "Preface"
  • "Editor in Chief"
  • "Chapter 1 Overview: Affirmation of Nanotechnology between 2000 and 2030"
  • "1.1 Introduction"
  • "1.2 Nanotechnology â?? A Foundational Megatrend in Science and Engineering"
  • "1.3 Three Stages for Establishing the New General Purpose Technology"
  • "1.4 Several Challenges for Nanotechnology Development"
  • "1.5 About the Return on Investment"
  • "1.6 Closing Remarks"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 2 Nanocarbon Materials in Catalysis"
  • "2.1 Introduction to Nanocarbon Materials"
  • "2.2 Synthesis and Functionalization of Nanocarbon Materials"
  • "2.2.1 Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes"
  • "2.2.2 Synthesis and Functionalization of Graphene and Graphene Oxide"
  • "2.2.3 Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon Nanodots"
  • "2.2.4 Synthesis and Functionalization of Mesoporous Carbon"
  • "2.3 Applications of Nanocarbon Materials in Electrocatalysis"
  • "2.3.1 Oxygen Reduction Reaction"
  • "2.3.2 Oxygen Evolution Reaction"
  • "2.3.3 Hydrogen Evolution Reaction"
  • "2.3.4 Roles of Nanocarbon Materials in Catalytic CO2 Reduction Reaction"
  • "2.4 Applications of Nanocarbon Materials in Photocatalysis"
  • "2.4.1 Application of Nanocarbon Materials as Photogenerated Charge Acceptors"
  • "2.4.2 Application of Nanocarbon Materials as Electron Shuttle Mediator"
  • "2.4.3 Application of Nanocarbon Materials as Cocatalyst for Photocatalysts"
  • "2.4.4 Application of Nanocarbon Materials as Active Photocatalyst"
  • "2.5 Summary"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 3 Controlling and Characterizing Anisotropic Nanomaterial Dispersion"
  • "3.1 Introduction"
  • "3.2 What Is Dispersion and Why Is It Important?"
  • "3.2.1 Factors Affecting Dispersion"
  • "3.2.2 Thermodynamic Dissolution of Pristine Nanomaterials"
  • "3.2.3 Intermolecular Potential in Dispersions"
  • "3.2.4 Functionalization of Nanomaterials"
  • "3.2.5 Physical Mixing"
  • "3.2.5.1 Sonication"
  • "3.2.5.2 Solvent Intercalation Methods"
  • "3.2.5.3 Shear Mixing Methods"
  • "3.3 Characterizing Dispersion State in Fluids"
  • "3.3.1 Visualization"
  • "3.3.2 Spectroscopy"
  • "3.3.3 TEM"
  • "3.3.4 AFM"
  • "3.3.5 Light Scattering"
  • "3.3.6 Rheology"
  • "3.4 Characterization of Dispersion State in Solidified Materials"
  • "3.4.1 Microscopy"
  • "3.4.2 Electrical Percolation"
  • "3.4.3 Mechanical Property Enhancement"
  • "3.4.4 Thermal Property Changes"
  • "3.5 Conclusion"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 4 Highâ??Throughput Nanomanufacturing via Spray Processes"
  • "4.1 Introduction"
  • "4.2 Flash Nanoprecipitation"
  • "4.2.1 Overview"
  • "4.2.2 Importance of Rapid Mixing"
  • "4.2.3 Mixers Employed in FNP"
  • "4.2.3.1 Confined Impinging Jet Mixers (CIJMs)"
  • "4.2.3.2 Multiâ??Inlet Vortex Mixers (MIVMs)"
  • "4.2.3.3 Mixer Selection"
  • "4.2.4 FNP Product Structure"
  • "4.2.5 Applications of FNP Nanocomposites"
  • "4.3 Electrospray"
  • "4.3.1 Overview"
  • "4.3.2 Single Nozzle Electrospray"
  • "4.3.2.1 Forces and Modes of Electrospray"
  • "4.3.2.2 Applications of Single Nozzle Electrospray"
  • "4.3.3 Coaxial Electrospray"
  • "4.3.3.1 Configuration"
  • "4.3.3.2 Applications"
  • "4.3.4 Future Directions"
  • "4.4 Liquidâ??inâ??Liquid Electrospray"
  • "4.4.1 Overview"
  • "4.4.2 Importance of Relative Conductivities of the Dispersed and Continuous Phases"
  • "4.4.3 Modified Liquidâ??inâ??Liquid Electrospray Designs"
  • "4.4.4 Applications and Future Directions"
  • "4.5 Sprayâ??Assisted Layerâ??byâ??Layer Assembly"
  • "4.5.1 Overview"
  • "4.5.2 Influence of Processing Parameters on Film Quality"
  • "4.5.2.1 Effect of Concentration"
  • "4.5.2.2 Effect of Spraying Time"
  • "4.5.2.3 Effect of Spraying Distance"
  • "4.5.2.4 Effect of Air Pressure"
  • "4.5.2.5 Effect of Charge Density"
  • "4.5.2.6 Effect of Rinsing and Blowâ??Drying"
  • "4.5.2.7 Effect of Rinsing Solution"
  • "4.5.3 Applications"
  • "4.5.4 Future Directions"
  • "4.6 Conclusion and Future Directions"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 5 Overview of Nanotechnology in Military and Aerospace Applications"
  • "5.1 Introduction"
  • "5.2 Implications of Nanotechnology in Military and Aerospace Systems Applications"
  • "5.3 Nanoâ??Based Microsensor Technology for the Detection of Chemical Agents"
  • "5.3.1 Surfaceâ??Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy"
  • "5.3.1.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.3.1.2 Experiment"
  • "5.3.1.3 Results"
  • "5.3.2 Voltammetric Techniques"
  • "5.3.2.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.3.2.2 Experimental/Test Setup"
  • "5.3.2.3 Results"
  • "5.3.3 Functionalized Nanowires â?? Zinc Oxide"
  • "5.3.3.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.3.3.2 Experimental/Test Setup"
  • "5.3.3.3 Results"
  • "5.3.4 Functionalized Nanowires â?? Tin Oxide"
  • "5.3.4.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.3.4.2 Prototype Configuration/Testing"
  • "5.3.4.3 Results"
  • "5.4 Nanotechnology for Missile Health Monitoring"
  • "5.4.1 Nanoporous Membrane Sensors"
  • "5.4.1.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.4.1.2 Experimental Setup and Prototype Configuration"
  • "5.4.1.3 Results"
  • "5.4.2 Multichannel Chip with Singleâ??Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sensor Arrays"
  • "5.4.2.1 Design Concept"
  • "5.4.2.2 Experimental Configuration"
  • "5.4.2.3 Results"
  • "5.4.3 Optical Spectroscopic Configured Sensing Techniques â?? Fiber Optics"
  • "5.4.3.1 Design Concept Spectroscopic Sensing"
  • "5.4.3.2 Experimental Approach/Aged Propellant Samples"
  • "5.4.3.3 Results from Absorption Measurements"
  • "5.5 Nanoenergetics â?? Missile Propellants"
  • "5.5.1 Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes"
  • "5.5.1.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.5.1.2 Experiment"
  • "5.5.1.3 Results"
  • "5.5.2 Singleâ??Wall Carbon Nanotubes"
  • "5.5.2.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.5.2.2 Experiment"
  • "5.5.2.3 Results"
  • "5.6 Nanocomposites for Missile Motor Casings and Structural Components"
  • "5.6.1 Thermal Methods"
  • "5.6.2 Vibrational Methods"
  • "5.6.2.1 Design Approach"
  • "5.6.2.2 Experiment"
  • "5.6.2.3 Results"
  • "5.7 Nanoplasmonics"
  • "5.7.1 Metallic Nanostructures"
  • "5.7.2 Galliumâ??Based UV Plasmonics"
  • "5.8 Nanothermal Batteries and Supercapacitors"
  • "5.9 Conclusion"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 6 Novel Polymer Nanocomposite Ablative Technologies for Thermal Protection of Propulsion and Reentry Systems for Space Applications"
  • "6.1 Introduction"
  • "6.2 Motor Nozzle and Insulation Materials"
  • "6.2.1 Behavior of Ablative Materials"
  • "6.3 Advanced Polymer Nanocomposite Ablatives"
  • "6.3.1 Polymer Nanocomposites for Motor Nozzle"
  • "6.3.1.1 Phenolic Nanocomposites Studies by The University of Texas at Austin"
  • "6.3.1.2 Phenolicâ??MWNT Nanocomposites Studies by Texas State Universityâ??San Marcos"
  • "6.3.2 Polymer Nanocomposites for Internal Insulation"
  • "6.3.2.1 Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposite (TPUN) Studies by The University of Texas at Austin"
  • "6.4 New Sensing Technology"
  • "6.4.1 In situ Ablation Recession and Thermal Sensors"
  • "6.4.1.1 Production of the C/C Sensor Plugs"
  • "6.4.1.2 Ablation Test Results of Carbon/Carbon Sensors"
  • "6.4.1.3 Ablation Test Results of Carbon/Phenolic Carbon Sensors"
  • "6.4.1.4 Other Ablation Sensors Results"
  • "6.4.1.5 Summary and Conclusions"
  • "6.4.2 Char Strength Sensor"
  • "6.4.2.1 Setup and Calibration of Compression Sensor"
  • "6.4.2.2 Analysis Method"
  • "6.4.2.3 Char Compressive Strength Results"
  • "6.4.2.4 Additional Considerations on the Interpretation of the Data"
  • "6.4.2.5 Concluding Remarks"
  • "6.5 Technologies Needed to Advance Polymer Nanocomposite Ablative Research"
  • "6.5.1 Thermophysical Properties Characterization"
  • "6.5.1.1 Thermal Conductivity"
  • "6.5.1.2 Thermal Expansion"
  • "6.5.1.3 Density and Composition"
  • "6.5.1.4 Microstructure"
  • "6.5.1.5 Elemental Composition"
  • "6.5.1.6 Char Yield"
  • "6.5.1.7 Specific Heat"
  • "6.5.1.8 Heat of Combustion"
  • "6.5.1.9 Optical Properties"
  • "6.5.1.10 Porosity"
  • "6.5.1.11 Permeability"
  • "6.5.2 Ablation Modeling"
  • "6.6 Summary and Conclusion"
  • "Nomenclature"
  • "Acronyms"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 7 Manufacture of Multiscale Composites"
  • "7.1 Introduction"
  • "7.1.1 Multifunctionality of Multiscale Composites"
  • "7.1.2 Nanomaterials"
  • "7.2 Nanoconstituents Preparation Processes"
  • "7.2.1 Functionalization of CNTs"
  • "7.2.1.1 Chemical Functionalization"
  • "7.2.1.2 Physical (Noncovalent) Functionalization"
  • "7.2.2 Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes"
  • "7.2.2.1 Ultrasonication"
  • "7.2.2.2 Calendering Process"
  • "7.2.2.3 Ball Milling"
  • "7.2.2.4 Stir and Extrusion"
  • "7.2.3 Alignment of CNTS"
  • "7.2.3.1 Ex situ Alignment"
  • "7.2.3.2 Force Fieldâ??Induced Alignment of CNTs"
  • "7.2.3.3 Magnetic Fieldâ??Induced Alignment of CNTs"
  • "7.2.3.4 Electrospinningâ??Induced Alignment of CNTs"
  • "7.2.3.5 Liquid Crystalline Phaseâ??induced Alignment of CNTs"
  • "7.3 Liquid Composites Molding (LCM) Processes for Multiscale Composites Manufacturing"
  • "7.3.1 Resin Transfer Molding (RTM)"
  • "7.3.2 Vacuumâ??Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM)"
  • "7.3.3 Resin Film Infusion (RFI)"
  • "7.3.4 The Resin Infusion under Flexible Tooling (RIFT) and Resin Infusion between Double Flexible Tooling (RIDFT)"
  • "7.3.5 Autoclave Manufacturing"
  • "7.3.6 Outâ??ofâ??Autoclave Manufacturing: Quickset"
  • "7.3.6.1 Quickstep"
  • "7.4 Continuous Manufacturing Processes for Multiscale Composites"
  • "7.4.1 Pultrusion"
  • "7.4.2 Filament Winding"
  • "7.5 Challenges and Advances in Multiscale Composites Manufacturing â?? Environmental, Health, and Safety (E, H, & S)"
  • "7.5.1 Nanoconstituents Processing Hazards"
  • "7.5.2 Composite Production and Processing"
  • "7.5.3 Life Cycle Assessment â?? Use and Disposal"
  • "7.6 Modeling and Simulation Tools for Multiscale Composites Manufacture"
  • "7.6.1 Nanoparticle Modeling"
  • "7.6.2 Molecular Modeling"
  • "7.6.3 Simulation"
  • "7.7 Conclusion"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 8 Bioinspired Systems"
  • "8.1 Introduction and Literature Overview"
  • "8.2 Electrical Properties of a Single Palladiumâ??Coated Biotemplate"
  • "8.3 Materials and Methods"
  • "8.4 Results and Discussion"
  • "8.5 Conclusion and Outlook"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 9 Prediction of Carbon Nanotube Buckypaper Mechanical Properties with Integrated Physicsâ??Based and Statistical Models"
  • "9.1 Introduction"
  • "9.2 Manufacturing Process of Buckypaper"
  • "9.3 Finite Elementâ??Based Computational Models for Buckypaper Mechanical Property Prediction"
  • "9.4 Calibration and Adjustment of FE Models with Statistical Methods"
  • "9.5 Summary"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 10 Fabrication and Fatigue of Fiberâ??Reinforced Polymer Nanocomposites â?? A Tool for Quality Control"
  • "10.1 Introduction"
  • "10.2 Materials"
  • "10.2.1 Carbon Fabric and Fiber"
  • "10.2.2 Glass Fabric and Fibers"
  • "10.2.3 Polymer Resin"
  • "10.2.4 Carbon Nanotubes"
  • "10.2.5 Carbon Nanofibers"
  • "10.2.6 Nanoclays"
  • "10.3 Composite Fabrication"
  • "10.3.1 Hand Layup"
  • "10.3.2 Resin Transfer Molding"
  • "10.4 Discussion â?? Fatigue and Fracture"
  • "10.4.1 Fatigue and Durability"
  • "10.4.2 Carbon Nanotube â?? Polymer Matrix Composites"
  • "10.4.3 Carbon Nanofiber â?? Polymer Matrix Composites"
  • "10.4.4 Nanoclay â?? Polymer Matrix Composites"
  • "10.5 Summary and Conclusion"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 11 Nanoclays: A Review of Their Toxicological Profiles and Risk Assessment Implementation Strategies"
  • "11.1 Introduction"
  • "11.2 Nanoclay Structure and Resulting Applications"
  • "11.3 Nanoclays in Food Packaging Applications"
  • "11.4 Possible Toxicity upon Implementation of Nanoclay in Consumer Applications"
  • "11.4.1 In Vitro Studies Reveal the Potential of Nanoclay to Induce Changes in Cellular Viability"
  • "11.4.2 Proposed Mechanisms of Toxicity for the In Vitro Cellular Studies"
  • "11.4.3 In Vivo Evaluation of Nanoclay Toxicity"
  • "11.5 Conclusion and Outlook"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Chapter 12 Nanotechnology EHS: Manufacturing and Colloidal Aspects"
  • "12.1 Introduction"
  • "12.1.1 Challenges"
  • "12.1.2 Recent Initiatives and Reviews"
  • "12.2 Colloidal Properties and Environmental Transformations"
  • "12.3 Assessing Nano EHS"
  • "12.3.1 Example: Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs)"
  • "12.3.2 Role of Manufacturing"
  • "Summary"
  • "Acknowledgments"
  • "References"
  • "Index"

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