Chemesthesis

Chemical Touch in Food and Eating
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 15. Januar 2016
  • |
  • 312 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-95163-7 (ISBN)
 
Chemesthesis are the chemically initiated sensations that occur via the touch system. Examples in the mouth include the burn of capsaicinoids in chilies, the cooling of menthol in peppermint, and the tingle of carbonation. It is physiologically distinct from taste and smell, but is increasingly understood to be just as important as these senses for their contribution to flavor, especially with the sustained growth in interest in spicy foods from around the world.
Chemesthesis: Chemical Touch in Food and Eating surveys the modern body of work on chemesthesis, with a variety of contributors who are well known for their expertise on the topic. After a forward by John Prescott and an introduction by Barry Green (who originally coined the term chemesthesis 25 years ago), the book moves on to survey chemesthetic spices and address the psychology and physiology of chemesthesis; practical sensory and instrumental analysis; the interaction of chemesthesis with other chemical senses; health ramifications; and the application of chemesthesis in food. The major types of chemesthesis, including pungency/burning, cooling, tingling, nasal irritation, and numbing, are each covered in their own chapter. The book concludes with a look to the future.
This is the first comprehensive book on chemesthesis since 1990, when Barry Green and his colleagues edited a volume on the perception of chemical irritants, including those in food. This new book is intended to be a vital resource for anyone interested in the sensory impact of the food we eat, including food scientists, sensory professionals, analytical chemists, physiologists, culinary scientists, and others.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 7,93 MB
978-1-118-95163-7 (9781118951637)
1118951638 (1118951638)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Table of Contents
  • List of contributors
  • Foreword
  • References
  • Preface
  • CHAPTER 1: Introduction: what is chemesthesis?
  • 1.1 A brief history
  • 1.2 What is its relevance today?
  • References
  • CHAPTER 2: Psychology of chemesthesis - why would anyone want to be in pain?
  • 2.1 Introduction and background
  • 2.2 Physiological differences: maybe they can't feel the burn?
  • 2.3 Effects of exposure on chemesthetic response (social)
  • 2.4 Cognitive factors underlying chemesthetic response: state versus trait
  • 2.5 Benefits of liking
  • 2.6 Summary
  • References
  • CHAPTER 3: Spice and herb extracts with chemesthetic effects
  • 3.1 Why plants have chemesthetic properties
  • 3.2 Hot pungent spices: capsicum species
  • 3.3 Other hot pungent spices
  • 3.4 Nasal heat spices
  • 3.5 Cooling spices
  • 3.6 Numbing spices
  • 3.7 Tingling spices
  • 3.8 Spice and herb extracts
  • 3.9 Regulatory control of spices and herb extracts with chemesthetic properties
  • 3.10 Advantages of spices, essential oils, and oleoresins
  • References
  • CHAPTER 4: Molecular mechanisms underlying the role of TRP channels in chemesthesis
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 TRPM8
  • 4.3 TRPV1
  • 4.4 TRPA1
  • 4.5 Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • CHAPTER 5: Anatomy and physiology of chemesthesis
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Anatomy
  • 5.3 Physiology
  • 5.4 Summary
  • References
  • CHAPTER 6: Types of chemesthesis I. Pungency and burn: historical perspectives, word usage, and temporal characteristics
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Language usage
  • 6.3 Differentiation from classical tastes
  • 6.4 Sensitization
  • 6.5 Acute psychophysical desensitization
  • 6.6 Chronic psychophysical desensitization
  • 6.7 Summary
  • References
  • CHAPTER 7: Types of chemesthesis II: Cooling
  • 7.1 Consumers and oral perception: where chemesthesis contributes to flavor
  • 7.2 Molecular structure and physiological cooling
  • 7.3 Physiological cooling outside of the oral cavity
  • 7.4 Usage and consumer perception
  • 7.5 Cooling compounds - the next steps
  • References
  • CHAPTER 8: Types of chemesthesis III. Tingling and numbing
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Tingle mechanisms
  • 8.3 Numbing (anaesthetic) mechanisms
  • 8.4 Tingle/numbing neural processing
  • 8.5 Psychophysical evaluations of tingle
  • 8.6 Psychophysical evaluations of numbing
  • 8.7 Summary
  • References
  • CHAPTER 9: Interactions in chemesthesis: everything affects everything else
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Coolants
  • 9.3 Sweet
  • 9.4 Salt
  • 9.5 Mouthfeel
  • 9.6 Astringency and bitterness
  • 9.7 Aroma (retronasal and orthonasal)
  • 9.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 10: Some like it hot! Sensory analysis of products containing chemesthetic compounds
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Overview of test approaches for sensory evaluation of chemesthetic compounds in consumer products
  • 10.3 The phenomena of sensitization and desensitization
  • 10.4 Testing products containing chemesthetic compounds
  • 10.5 Discrimination testing with trigeminal compounds
  • 10.6 Rating of chemesthetic agent intensity
  • 10.7 Dose response
  • 10.8 Descriptive analysis of chemesthetic agents containing samples
  • 10.9 Alcohol burn case study
  • 10.10 Time intensity
  • 10.11 Consumer testing with chemesthetic agents
  • 10.12 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • CHAPTER 11: Analytical chemistry of chemesthetic compounds
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Allyl isothiocyanate
  • 11.3 Capsaicinoids
  • 11.4 Carbonic acid
  • 11.5 Cinnamaldehyde
  • 11.6 Eugenol
  • 11.7 Gingerols and shogaols
  • 11.8 Menthol
  • 11.9 Piperine
  • 11.10 Sanshools
  • 11.11 Spilanthol
  • 11.12 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • CHAPTER 12: Chemesthesis and health
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Cultural patterns of intake
  • 12.3 Appetite
  • 12.4 Thermogenesis
  • 12.5 Body weight
  • 12.6 Individual variability
  • 12.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 13: On food and chemesthesis - food science and culinary perspectives
  • 13.1 Introduction: putting chemesthesis in the context of flavor
  • 13.2 Historical and cultural context for the use of chemesthetic ingredients in foods
  • 13.3 Sources of chemesthetic agents in the kitchen and at the product development lab bench
  • 13.4 Culinary techniques and chemesthetic agents
  • 13.5 Applications of chemesthetic agents in the food industry
  • References
  • CHAPTER 14: Overview of chemesthesis with a look to the future
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Peripheral innervation of oral, ocular, and nasal mucosa and skin
  • 14.3 TRPV1
  • 14.4 TRPA1
  • 14.5 TRPV3, TRPV4, and warming
  • 14.6 TRPM8 and cold
  • 14.7 Tingle
  • 14.8 NaCl
  • 14.9 Itch
  • 14.10 Interactions between chemesthesis and taste
  • 14.11 Summary and conclusions
  • References
  • Index
  • End User License Agreement

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.

Inhalt (PDF)

Download (sofort verfügbar)

132,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok