A Companion to Euripides

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 12. Dezember 2016
  • |
  • 632 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-25751-6 (ISBN)
 
A Companion to Euripides is an up-to-date, centralized assessment of Euripides and his work, drawing from the most recently published texts, commentaries, and scholarship, and offering detailed discussions and provocative interpretations of his extant plays and fragments.
* The most contemporary scholarship on Euripides and his oeuvre, featuring the latest texts and commentaries
* Leading scholars in the field discuss all of Euripides' plays and their afterlife with breadth and depth
* A dedicated section focuses on the reception of Euripidean drama since the Hellenistic
* Original and provocative interpretations of Euripides and his plays forge important paths of in future scholarship
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
John Wiley & Sons
  • 3,48 MB
978-1-119-25751-6 (9781119257516)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 7]
4 - Notes on Contributors [Seite 10]
5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 15]
6 - List of abbreviations [Seite 16]
7 - Chapter 1 Introduction [Seite 19]
7.1 - 1 Euripides [Seite 20]
7.2 - 2 New Approaches [Seite 21]
7.3 - 3 This Volume [Seite 22]
7.4 - 4 Conclusion [Seite 25]
7.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 25]
8 - Part I Text, Author, and Tradition [Seite 27]
8.1 - Chapter 2 Text and Transmission [Seite 29]
8.1.1 - 1 The Earliest Copies [Seite 30]
8.1.2 - 2 From Alexandria to Late Antiquity [Seite 31]
8.1.3 - 3 The Middle Ages [Seite 34]
8.1.4 - 4 The Lost Plays [Seite 39]
8.1.5 - 5 Modern Editions [Seite 39]
8.1.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 42]
8.1.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 44]
8.2 - Chapter 3 The Euripidean Biography [Seite 45]
8.2.1 - 1 What We Know [Seite 45]
8.2.2 - 2 The Poetic Career [Seite 45]
8.2.3 - 3 Ancient Biographical Traditions [Seite 46]
8.2.4 - 4 Misogyny and Misanthropy [Seite 50]
8.2.5 - 5 Popularity [Seite 53]
8.2.6 - 6 A Death in Macedon [Seite 55]
8.2.7 - 7 Summary [Seite 57]
8.2.8 - WORKS CITED [Seite 58]
8.2.9 - FURTHER READING [Seite 59]
8.3 - Chapter 4 Euripides and the Development of Greek Tragedy [Seite 60]
8.3.1 - 1 Life in the Theater [Seite 60]
8.3.2 - 2 Women Bad and Good [Seite 64]
8.3.3 - 3 Language and Composition [Seite 67]
8.3.4 - 4 Coming to the End [Seite 71]
8.3.5 - 5 Conclusion [Seite 73]
8.3.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 74]
8.3.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 76]
9 - Part II Early Plays (438-416 bce) [Seite 77]
9.1 - Chapter 5 Alcestis [Seite 79]
9.1.1 - 1 The Alcestis and Genre [Seite 80]
9.1.2 - 2 Structure, Characterization, and Major Themes in the Alcestis [Seite 83]
9.1.3 - 3 Gender [Seite 88]
9.1.4 - 4 Incongruous Feelings? Pity and Eros in the Alcestis [Seite 90]
9.1.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 93]
9.1.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 96]
9.2 - Chapter 6 Medea [Seite 98]
9.2.1 - 1 Medea as Barbarian? [Seite 98]
9.2.2 - 2 Medea as Woman [Seite 100]
9.2.3 - 3 Medea as Avenger: The Ending of the Play [Seite 105]
9.2.4 - WORKS CITED [Seite 108]
9.2.5 - FURTHER READING [Seite 109]
9.3 - Chapter 7 Children of Heracles [Seite 110]
9.3.1 - 1 The Legend of the Heraclidae and Athenian Patriotism [Seite 112]
9.3.2 - 2 Supplication and Athenian Idealism [Seite 113]
9.3.3 - 3 Political Paralysis and Transformation [Seite 116]
9.3.4 - 4 Reversals of Power [Seite 119]
9.3.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 122]
9.3.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 123]
9.3.7 - NOTES [Seite 124]
9.4 - Chapter 8 Hippolytus [Seite 125]
9.4.1 - 1 Second Attempts and Second Thoughts [Seite 126]
9.4.2 - 2 Phaedra [Seite 129]
9.4.3 - 3 Hippolytus [Seite 131]
9.4.4 - 4 Theseus [Seite 132]
9.4.5 - 5 The Role of the Gods [Seite 134]
9.4.6 - 6 Finding Sympathy [Seite 136]
9.4.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 137]
9.4.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 139]
9.5 - Chapter 9 Andromache [Seite 140]
9.5.1 - 1 Synopsis [Seite 140]
9.5.2 - 2 Date and Production [Seite 141]
9.5.3 - 3 Euripides and the Myth [Seite 142]
9.5.4 - 4 "If gods do wrong .?.?." [Seite 144]
9.5.5 - 5 Reading Andromache [Seite 146]
9.5.6 - 6 Staging Andromache [Seite 149]
9.5.7 - 7 Final Thoughts [Seite 151]
9.5.8 - WORKS CITED [Seite 152]
9.5.9 - FURTHER READING [Seite 153]
9.6 - Chapter 10 Hecuba [Seite 154]
9.6.1 - 1 Hecuba's Historical Context and Reception [Seite 155]
9.6.2 - 2 Hecuba's Binary Structure [Seite 156]
9.6.3 - 3 Hecuba's Divine Machinery [Seite 157]
9.6.4 - 4 Hecuba's Moral Ontology [Seite 159]
9.6.5 - 5 The Ethical Positions of Hecuba's Principal Characters [Seite 161]
9.6.6 - 6 Conclusion: Hecuba's Transformations as Expressions of its Moral Landscape [Seite 166]
9.6.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 167]
9.6.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 169]
9.7 - Chapter 11 Suppliant Women [Seite 170]
9.7.1 - 1 Myth and Plot [Seite 172]
9.7.2 - 2 The Chorus [Seite 174]
9.7.3 - 3 Aethra [Seite 175]
9.7.4 - 4 Recovery of the Bodies [Seite 179]
9.7.5 - 5 Suicide of Evadne [Seite 180]
9.7.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 182]
9.7.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 183]
9.8 - Chapter 12 Electra [Seite 184]
9.8.1 - 1 Synopsis [Seite 184]
9.8.2 - 2 Date [Seite 185]
9.8.3 - 3 The Myth [Seite 186]
9.8.4 - 4 Dramatic Treatments of the Myth [Seite 188]
9.8.5 - 5 Setting [Seite 189]
9.8.6 - 6 The Farmer's Hut [Seite 191]
9.8.7 - 7 Themes [Seite 193]
9.8.8 - WORKS CITED [Seite 197]
9.8.9 - FURTHER READING [Seite 199]
9.8.10 - NOTE [Seite 199]
9.9 - Chapter 13 Heracles: The Perfect Piece [Seite 200]
9.9.1 - 1 Heracles in Pieces [Seite 201]
9.9.2 - 2 A Hero's Return [Seite 202]
9.9.3 - 3 Heracles in Pieces [Seite 204]
9.9.4 - 4 Of God to Man [Seite 208]
9.9.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 211]
9.9.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 213]
10 - Part III Later Plays (After 416 bce) [Seite 215]
10.1 - Chapter 14 Trojan Women [Seite 217]
10.1.1 - 1 Background [Seite 217]
10.1.2 - 2 Anti-War [Seite 220]
10.1.3 - 3 Women as Victim or Heroic [Seite 223]
10.1.4 - 4 The Love Charm [Seite 225]
10.1.5 - 5 Neither Simply Anti-war nor Simply Feminist [Seite 227]
10.1.6 - 6 Mortal and Immortal [Seite 228]
10.1.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 229]
10.1.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 231]
10.1.9 - NOTE [Seite 231]
10.2 - Chapter 15 Iphigenia in Tauris [Seite 232]
10.2.1 - 1 The Myths [Seite 234]
10.2.2 - 2 The Play within the Euripidean Corpus [Seite 236]
10.2.3 - 3 Rescue/Escape/Safety [Seite 239]
10.2.4 - WORKS CITED [Seite 244]
10.2.5 - FURTHER READING [Seite 245]
10.3 - Chapter 16 Ion: an Edible Fairy Tale? [Seite 246]
10.3.1 - 1 Autochthony and Identity [Seite 247]
10.3.2 - 2 Psychological Readings: The Role of the Son [Seite 249]
10.3.3 - 3 Psychological Readings: the Role of the Mother [Seite 251]
10.3.4 - 4 Men and Gods [Seite 253]
10.3.5 - 5 Food for the Soul [Seite 255]
10.3.6 - 6 Conclusion [Seite 257]
10.3.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 257]
10.3.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 260]
10.4 - Chapter 17 Significant Inconsistencies in Euripides' Helen [Seite 261]
10.4.1 - 1 A Twisted Plot [Seite 261]
10.4.2 - 2 Diverse Interpretations [Seite 263]
10.4.3 - 3 Paradoxes and Discrepancies [Seite 265]
10.4.4 - 4 Formal Anomalies, and a Most Unusual Chorus [Seite 271]
10.4.5 - 5 Final Indeterminacy [Seite 273]
10.4.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 274]
10.4.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 275]
10.4.8 - NOTE [Seite 275]
10.5 - Chapter 18 Phoenician Women [Seite 276]
10.5.1 - 1 Synopsis [Seite 277]
10.5.2 - 2 Date and Trilogy [Seite 277]
10.5.3 - 3 Staging and Features of the Fifth-Century Premiere [Seite 278]
10.5.4 - 4 Phoenician Women and Theban Myth [Seite 279]
10.5.5 - 5 On and Off Stage: Space and the Phoenician Women [Seite 283]
10.5.6 - 6 Final Thoughts [Seite 286]
10.5.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 286]
10.5.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 287]
10.6 - Chapter 19 Orestes [Seite 288]
10.6.1 - 1 Electra and Helen Exchange Pleasantries, and Then .?.?. [Seite 290]
10.6.2 - 2 Agonizing with Orestes [Seite 292]
10.6.3 - 3 More Plotting, Helen Killed (?), Hermione Taken Hostage, the Friends Encircled, the House of Atreus Set on Fire, Apollo Intervenes [Seite 296]
10.6.4 - 4 A Tragedy for All Ages [Seite 299]
10.6.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 299]
10.6.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 301]
10.7 - Chapter 20 Iphigenia at Aulis [Seite 302]
10.7.1 - 1 Plot [Seite 303]
10.7.2 - 2 Characters and Changes of Mind [Seite 307]
10.7.3 - 3 Chorus [Seite 308]
10.7.4 - 4 Marriage and Sacrifice [Seite 310]
10.7.5 - 5 War, Slavery, Politics [Seite 311]
10.7.6 - 6 A Self-Conscious Drama [Seite 313]
10.7.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 314]
10.7.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 315]
10.8 - Chapter 21 Bacchae [Seite 316]
10.8.1 - 1 Recent Trends in Scholarship on the Bacchae [Seite 318]
10.8.2 - 2 Foreign Cult [Seite 321]
10.8.3 - 3 Sex, Drugs, and Kettledrums [Seite 322]
10.8.4 - WORKS CITED [Seite 327]
10.8.5 - FURTHER READING [Seite 329]
11 - Part IV Satyr, Spurious, and Fragmentary Plays [Seite 331]
11.1 - Chapter 22 Cyclops [Seite 333]
11.1.1 - 1 Satyr Drama: "Tragedy at Play" [Seite 333]
11.1.2 - 2 Cyclops and Major Themes of Satyric Drama [Seite 336]
11.1.3 - 3 Setting the Scene [Seite 337]
11.1.4 - 4 Burgeoning Philia: Odysseus and the Satyrs vs Polyphemos [Seite 339]
11.1.5 - 5 With(out) a Little Help from his Friends, or Odysseus' Revenge [Seite 344]
11.1.6 - 6 Cyclops and Satyrs: An Overview [Seite 347]
11.1.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 348]
11.1.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 350]
11.1.9 - NOTES [Seite 350]
11.2 - Chapter 23 Rhesus [Seite 352]
11.2.1 - 1 What Happens in Rhesus? [Seite 352]
11.2.2 - 2 The Rhesus Myth before Rhesus [Seite 354]
11.2.3 - 3 Stagecraft and Dramaturgy: Accomplishments and Failures [Seite 356]
11.2.4 - 4 Language and Style: A Derivative Play [Seite 359]
11.2.5 - 5 Did Euripides Write the Rhesus we Have? [Seite 361]
11.2.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 362]
11.2.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 364]
11.3 - Chapter 24 Fragments and Fragmentary Plays [Seite 365]
11.3.1 - 1 A Few Facts and Figures [Seite 365]
11.3.2 - 2 The Nature of the Evidence and how it has Survived [Seite 366]
11.3.3 - 3 Collecting, Editing, and Studying the Fragments [Seite 368]
11.3.4 - 4 List of Euripides' Known Plays, with (Mostly Approximate) Dates [Seite 369]
11.3.5 - 5 Reconstruction of Fragmentary Plays: Possibilities and Limits [Seite 370]
11.3.6 - 6 What and how do Fragments add to the Appreciation of Euripides? [Seite 371]
11.3.7 - 7 Some Individual Phenomena: Pairs of Name-Plays [Seite 373]
11.3.8 - 8 Illustrative Case-Studies: Ino, Palamedes, Phoenix [Seite 374]
11.3.9 - 9 Supplementary Note 2015 [Seite 378]
11.3.10 - WORKS CITED [Seite 379]
11.3.11 - FURTHER READING [Seite 381]
12 - Part V Form, Structure, and Performance [Seite 383]
12.1 - Chapter 25 Form and Structure [Seite 385]
12.1.1 - 1 Aristotelian Basics [Seite 386]
12.1.2 - 2 Formal Structures: Basic Units, Special Scene-Types, Microstructures, Other Features [Seite 388]
12.1.3 - 3 Narrative Patterns in Euripides [Seite 391]
12.1.4 - 4 The Interplay of Formal Structures and Narrative Patterns [Seite 395]
12.1.5 - 5 Clear Partition and Alternation between Actors' Scenes and Choral Parts [Seite 397]
12.1.6 - 6 Blending or Interlacing of Actors' Scenes and Choral Parts [Seite 399]
12.1.7 - 7 Initial Exposition of the Principal Character and His/Her Situation [Seite 400]
12.1.8 - 8 Intense Distress, Violent Backstage Action, Plot Acceleration [Seite 401]
12.1.9 - 9 Conclusion [Seite 403]
12.1.10 - WORKS CITED [Seite 404]
12.1.11 - FURTHER READING [Seite 407]
12.2 - Chapter 26 The Theater of Euripides [Seite 408]
12.2.1 - 1 Theater Industry and Audiences [Seite 409]
12.2.2 - 2 Social Change and Innovation in Euripides [Seite 410]
12.2.3 - 3 Formal Matters [Seite 413]
12.2.4 - 4 "Metatheater" and Stage Machinery: Theater in Construction [Seite 417]
12.2.5 - 5 Plum Roles in Euripidean Drama [Seite 420]
12.2.6 - 6 Theater Beyond Euripides [Seite 422]
12.2.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 423]
12.2.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 428]
12.2.9 - NOTES [Seite 428]
12.3 - Chapter 27 The Euripidean Chorus [Seite 430]
12.3.1 - 1 Varieties of Choral Experience [Seite 430]
12.3.2 - 2 Choral Sympathies [Seite 433]
12.3.3 - 3 Wider Contexts [Seite 437]
12.3.4 - 4 The Chorus as a Tragic Theme [Seite 439]
12.3.5 - 5 Musical History [Seite 442]
12.3.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 444]
12.3.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 445]
12.4 - Chapter 28 Euripides and the Sound of Music [Seite 446]
12.4.1 - 1 The Music of Attic Drama [Seite 446]
12.4.2 - 2 Music in Euripides' Tragedies [Seite 449]
12.4.3 - 3 Euripides and the New Music [Seite 451]
12.4.4 - 4 The Orestes Musical Papyrus [Seite 455]
12.4.5 - 5 The Sound of Music [Seite 456]
12.4.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 460]
12.4.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 460]
13 - Part VI Topics and Approaches [Seite 463]
13.1 - Chapter 29 Euripides and his Intellectual Context [Seite 465]
13.1.1 - 1 Literacy and the Alphabet [Seite 466]
13.1.2 - 2 Specialized Skills [Seite 469]
13.1.3 - 3 Relativism and Humanism [Seite 472]
13.1.4 - 4 Anthropology and Progress [Seite 476]
13.1.5 - 5 Agency and Responsibility [Seite 479]
13.1.6 - WORKS CITED [Seite 483]
13.1.7 - FURTHER READING [Seite 485]
13.2 - Chapter 30 Myth [Seite 486]
13.2.1 - 1 Tradition, Innovation, and Multiplicity [Seite 487]
13.2.2 - 2 The Selection and Deployment of Myths [Seite 490]
13.2.3 - 3 "Skepticism" and "Heterodoxy" in Context [Seite 493]
13.2.4 - 4 What Makes Euripides' Myths Distinctive? [Seite 495]
13.2.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 499]
13.2.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 500]
13.3 - Chapter 31 Euripides and Religion [Seite 501]
13.3.1 - 1 The Gods [Seite 502]
13.3.2 - 2 Impiety and Perjury [Seite 503]
13.3.3 - 3 Ritual [Seite 506]
13.3.4 - 4 Deformed Rituals [Seite 508]
13.3.5 - 5 False Rituals [Seite 509]
13.3.6 - 6 Syncretism [Seite 510]
13.3.7 - 7 Priestesses [Seite 512]
13.3.8 - 8 Conclusion [Seite 515]
13.3.9 - WORKS CITED [Seite 515]
13.3.10 - FURTHER READING [Seite 516]
13.4 - Chapter 32 Gender [Seite 518]
13.4.1 - 1 Critical Responses [Seite 520]
13.4.2 - 2 Gender in Context [Seite 524]
13.4.3 - WORKS CITED [Seite 530]
13.4.4 - FURTHER READING [Seite 532]
13.4.5 - NOTES [Seite 532]
14 - PART VII Reception [Seite 533]
14.1 - Chapter 33 Euripides, Aristophanes, and the Reception of "Sophistic" Styles [Seite 535]
14.1.1 - 1 Euripides, Agathon, and the Bumsy Style [Seite 538]
14.1.2 - 2 Socrates and Euripides [Seite 539]
14.1.3 - 3 Styles and "Styles" [Seite 540]
14.1.4 - 4 Literary Critical Practices and Places [Seite 544]
14.1.5 - 5 Euripides, Plato, and Later Reception [Seite 545]
14.1.6 - Acknowledgments [Seite 548]
14.1.7 - WORKS CITED [Seite 548]
14.1.8 - FURTHER READING [Seite 549]
14.1.9 - NOTES [Seite 549]
14.2 - Chapter 34 Euripides in the Fourth Century bce [Seite 551]
14.2.1 - 1 Euripides' Supposed Unpopularity [Seite 551]
14.2.2 - 2 Fourth-century Performances of Euripides [Seite 553]
14.2.3 - 3 Evidence for Euripides' Influence on Fourth-century Tragedy [Seite 554]
14.2.4 - 4 Conclusions [Seite 562]
14.2.5 - WORKS CITED [Seite 563]
14.2.6 - FURTHER READING [Seite 563]
14.3 - Chapter 35 Euripides and Senecan Drama [Seite 564]
14.3.1 - 1 Seneca on Euripides [Seite 566]
14.3.2 - 2 Madness of Hercules [Seite 568]
14.3.3 - 3 Trojan Women [Seite 572]
14.3.4 - 4 Phoenician Women [Seite 575]
14.3.5 - 5 Medea [Seite 576]
14.3.6 - 6 Phaedra [Seite 578]
14.3.7 - 7 Conclusion [Seite 579]
14.3.8 - WORKS CITED [Seite 580]
14.3.9 - FURTHER READING [Seite 582]
14.4 - Chapter 36 All Aboard the Bacchae Bus: Reception of Euripides in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries [Seite 583]
14.4.1 - 1 Criticism and Translation [Seite 584]
14.4.2 - 2 Performances [Seite 586]
14.4.3 - 3 Published Adaptations [Seite 588]
14.4.4 - WORKS CITED [Seite 597]
14.4.5 - FURTHER READING [Seite 599]
14.4.6 - NOTES [Seite 600]
15 - Index [Seite 601]
16 - EULA [Seite 633]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

168,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen