Online Learning and its Users

Lessons for Higher Education
 
 
Chandos Publishing
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 25. April 2016
  • |
  • 262 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100633-7 (ISBN)
 

Online Learning and Its Users: Lessons for Higher Education focuses on a rethinking of the approach we are currently taking to introducing new e-learning initiatives and the way we currently support staff and students with their use of technology.

Using an evidence-based case study, the book argues that we need to shift the focus of the discourse of e-learning research and development, with the aim of moving away from asking for additional use of technology.

Instead, our discourse needs to address the activities undertaken in teaching and learning in higher education. From these, we can identify the goals of the people undertaking a range of actions and the best ways technology can mediate these practices.


  • Presents the case for starting at the other end of the e-learning issue - with the users.
  • Includes a case study of the adoption of an e-learning technology on an institution-wide basis, and what really happens in this process
  • Offers perspectives from Ireland and the UK, presenting information in a way that is relevant to people working in higher education in both countries (and beyond)
  • Communicates accessibly and without jargon the key issues in e-learning which have relevance to all stakeholders in higher education


Dr Claire McAvinia is a Learning Development Officer at the Learning, Teaching and Technology Centre (LTTC) at Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) in Ireland. Claire is Coordinator of the Postgraduate Diploma in Third Level Learning and Teaching, and contributes to the MSc Applied eLearning and MA in Higher Education as well as workshops and other programmes offered by the LTTC. She was previously Learning Technologist at Maynooth University, mainstreaming the adoption of a virtual learning environment/learning management system (Moodle) across the university, and also managing a wide range of projects in teaching development and e-learning. Before joining Maynooth in 2004, Claire worked in the UK at the University of Surrey and University College London, gaining extensive experience in the use of e-learning integrated with learning and teaching development. She holds a BA and PhD from Trinity College Dublin, an MA from the University of Kent, and postgraduate certificates in learning and teaching from University College London and the Open University. Her current research interests are in educational technology generally, Activity Theory, and the development of digital literacies amongst staff and students at third level.
  • Englisch
  • OXford
Elsevier Science
  • 2,86 MB
978-0-08-100633-7 (9780081006337)
0081006330 (0081006330)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • ONLINE LEARNING AND ITS USERS
  • Series page
  • ONLINE LEARNING AND ITS USERS: Lessons for Higher Education
  • Copyright
  • CONTENTS
  • LIST OF FIGURES
  • LIST OF TABLES
  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  • FOREWORD
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT
  • INTRODUCTION
  • REASONS FOR WRITING
  • AIMS AND SCOPE
  • A NOTE ON THE STUDY
  • A NOTE ON TERMINOLOGY
  • AN OVERVIEW OF THIS BOOK
  • REFERENCES
  • 1 - Enter the VLE
  • 1.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 1.2 THE DEVELOPMENT OF ONLINE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 1.2.1 Global and Local Changes
  • 1.2.2 The 1980s-1990s: Stand-Alone, to Network, to Internet
  • 1.2.3 Late 1990s: Centralised Initiatives
  • 1.2.4 New Roles and Responsibilities
  • 1.3 VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
  • 1.3.1 Origins and Development of the Virtual Learning Environment
  • 1.3.2 Do Virtual Learning Environments Have In-built Pedagogies?
  • 1.4 HOW HAS THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS BEEN MAINSTREAMED AND SUPPORTED?
  • 1.4.1 The Growth of Academic Development and e-Learning Support Services
  • 1.4.2 Central Support Missions and Theories of Learning
  • 1.4.3 Challenges for Central Supporters
  • 1.5 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 2 - Challenges and Disappointments
  • 2.1 INTRODUCTION: THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AT THE CROSSROADS
  • 2.2 THE LITERATURE OF DISAPPOINTMENT
  • 2.3 A HISTORY OF DISAPPOINTMENT
  • 2.4 EXPLANATIONS AND PROPOSED SOLUTIONS
  • 2.4.1 Theoretical Issues
  • 2.4.2 Organisational Issues
  • 2.4.3 Methodological Issues
  • 2.4.4 Proposals for the Future
  • 2.4.5 Focusing on Activity
  • 2.5 CRITIQUING DISAPPOINTMENT: THE CASE OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  • 2.6 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 3 - Activity Theory
  • 3.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 3.2 WHAT IS ACTIVITY THEORY?
  • 3.2.1 A Short History of Activity Theory
  • 3.2.2 Engeström's Extension of the Activity Theory Framework
  • 3.3 IMPORTANT CONCEPTS IN ACTIVITY THEORY
  • 3.3.1 Consciousness, Context, Activity Are the Same
  • 3.3.2 Internalisation and Externalisation
  • 3.3.3 Activities Are Object-Oriented and Lead to an Outcome
  • 3.3.4 Activities Are Mediated and There Are Mediating Artefacts
  • 3.3.5 Activities Have Rules and a Division of Labour
  • 3.3.6 Rules
  • 3.3.7 Division of Labour
  • 3.3.8 Operations and Actions Contribute to Activities
  • 3.3.9 Contradictions in Activity Systems
  • 3.3.10 Activities Are Constantly Changing
  • 3.3.11 Activity Theory: Limitations and Strengths
  • 3.3.12 Issues in Modelling Activity Systems
  • 3.3.13 Individual and Collective Activities
  • 3.3.14 Limited Scope to Take Account of Cultural Diversity
  • 3.3.15 Activity Theory Does Not Have an Explicit Methodology
  • 3.3.16 Strengths of Activity Theory
  • 3.4 WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACTIVITY THEORY TO E-LEARNING?
  • 3.4.1 Activity Theory and Technology
  • 3.4.2 Activity Theory and Educational Change
  • 3.4.3 Activity Theory and Online Learning: Some Examples From Research
  • 3.5 OPERATIONALISING AND APPLYING ACTIVITY THEORY
  • 3.5.1 Rationale for Using Activity Theory
  • 3.5.2 Operationalising Activity Theory in This Study
  • 3.5.3 Participation and Resulting Data Set
  • 3.5.4 Analysing Data to Model Activity Systems
  • 3.5.5 Analysis and Interpretation of Data
  • 3.6 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • 4 - Lessons for e-Learning Management and Support
  • 4.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 4.2 THE ADOPTION AND MAINSTREAMING OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: THE ACTIVITIES OF MANAGERS
  • 4.2.1 Management Object 1: Select a Virtual Learning Environment
  • 4.2.2 Management Object 2: Support Mainstreaming of the Virtual Learning Environment
  • 4.2.3 Unshared Objects: Technology, and Enhancing Teaching and Learning
  • 4.2.3.1 Manager-Lecturer Object: Teach for Subject Knowledge and Transferable Skills
  • 4.2.3.2 Service Director Object: Enhancement of the Teaching and Learning Environment
  • 4.2.3.3 Senior Manager Object: Flexible Course Delivery
  • 4.2.3.4 Unshared Objects
  • 4.3 THE ADOPTION AND MAINSTREAMING OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: ACTIVITIES OF CENTRAL SUPPORTERS
  • 4.3.1 Central Supporter Object 1: Mainstream the Virtual Learning Environment
  • 4.3.2 Central Supporter Object 2: React to Departments' Needs
  • 4.3.3 Central Supporter Object 3: Carve Out Credibility
  • 4.4 DISCUSSION: LEARNING FROM CONTRADICTIONS
  • 4.4.1 Contradictions in Supporting the Mainstreaming of the Virtual Learning Environment
  • 4.4.2 Contradictions in Enhancing Teaching and Learning, and the Place of Technology
  • 4.4.3 Increasing Flexible Learning
  • 4.4.4 Transformation versus Pragmatism
  • 4.4.5 Contradictions in the Activities of Central Supporters
  • 4.4.5.1 The Problem of Support
  • 4.4.5.2 Intended/Unintended Outcomes
  • 4.4.5.3 Difficulties in Defining a New Object
  • 4.4.5.4 Difficulties in Defining the Place of Technology
  • 4.5 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 5 - Lessons for Teaching in Higher Education
  • 5.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 5.2 LECTURERS' USE OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  • 5.2.1 Lecturer Object 1: Teach the Core (Compulsory) Module Efficiently
  • 5.2.2 Lecturer Object 2: Teach the Content Module
  • 5.2.3 Three Further Objects: Publishing Activities
  • 5.2.3.1 Lecturer Object 3: Publishing to Foster Student Engagement-Georgia
  • 5.2.3.2 Lecturer Object 4: Publishing to Encourage Students to Read-Liz
  • 5.2.3.3 Lecturer Object 5: Publishing to Reduce Stress in the Classroom-Jo
  • 5.3 DISCUSSION: AN UNSHARED OBJECT BETWEEN LECTURERS AND CENTRAL SUPPORTERS
  • 5.4 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 6 - Lessons From Our Learners
  • 6.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 6.2 STUDENTS' USE OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  • 6.2.1 Student Object 1: Keep Up to Date
  • 6.2.2 Student Object 2: Undertake and Complete Coursework
  • 6.2.3 Inconsistent Experiences: Some Examples
  • 6.2.4 Inconsistent Experiences and Rules
  • 6.2.5 Unintended Outcomes
  • 6.3 DISCUSSION: AN UNSHARED OBJECT BETWEEN STUDENTS AND LECTURERS
  • 6.4 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • 7 - Learning to Break the Cycle
  • 7.1 INTRODUCTION: REVISITING CONTRADICTIONS AND UNSHARED OBJECTS
  • 7.1.1 The Activities of Managers and Central Supporters
  • 7.1.2 The Activities of Lecturers and Students
  • 7.2 THE STORY OF THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  • 7.2.1 What Has Been the Route of Adoption of the Virtual Learning Environment From Institutional Decision to 'Classroom' Use?
  • 7.2.2 Why Has There Been Limited Use of the Virtual Learning Environment?
  • 7.3 IDENTIFYING POINTS FOR DEVELOPMENT
  • 7.3.1 What Is the Purpose of Online Learning in a Campus-Based Higher Education Institution?
  • 7.3.2 Matching Support to Points for Development in Teaching Activities
  • 7.3.3 Defining a Pathway for Central Supporters
  • 7.3.4 Alternative Proposals for Support
  • 7.3.4.1 Management Level
  • 7.3.4.2 Central Supporters
  • 7.3.4.3 Lecturers
  • 7.3.4.4 Students
  • 7.3.5 Addressing Inconsistencies in Students' Experiences
  • 7.4 RECASTING THE DEBATE ABOUT ONLINE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 7.5 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 8 - Lessons for the Future - The VLE and the MOOC
  • 8.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 8.2 WHAT IS THE MOOC AND WHAT IS ITS SIGNIFICANCE?
  • 8.2.1 Defining the MOOC
  • 8.2.2 The Economics of the MOOC: Panacea
  • 8.2.3 The Economics of the MOOC: 'Unbundling'
  • 8.3 DOES THE MOOC WORK?
  • 8.3.1 Adoption and Uptake of the MOOC
  • 8.3.2 Teaching and Learning in a MOOC
  • 8.3.3 Next Steps for the MOOC
  • 8.4 MODELLING THE MOOC
  • 8.5 DISCUSSION
  • 8.6 WHAT CAN THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT REALLY TELL THE MOOC?
  • 8.7 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 9 - Conclusions
  • 9.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 9.2 FIVE LESSONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 9.2.1 We Need to Articulate What We Want From Online Learning in Campus-Based Institutions
  • 9.2.2 Higher Education Institutions Need to Plan for the Development of Online Learning Collectively
  • 9.2.3 Support Overheads Will Continue and Need to be Resourced Appropriately
  • 9.2.4 We Need More Institution-Wide Research into the Adoption of New Technologies
  • 9.2.5 We Need to Know Much More About Students' Learning in Modular Programmes of Study
  • 9.3 WHY IT MATTERS
  • 9.4 CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • INDEX
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Back Cover

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